Murderkill River

Water in the Changing Coastal Environment of Delaware (Project WiCCED)

Water in the Changing Coastal Environment of Delaware (Project WiCCED) is a multi-year National Science Foundation EPSCoR – funded effort that includes a consortium of scientists and educators from University of Delaware (UD), Delaware State University, Wesley College, and Delaware Technical and

Morphology and Tidal Inundation of Tidal Wetlands in the Delaware Estuary

An expanse of tidal wetlands fringes the Delaware Estuary and provides Delaware, Pennsylvania, and New Jersey with abundant ecosystem services including habitat for indigenous and migrating plants and wildlife, biogeochemical cycling of nutrients, preserving water quality, flood hazard mitigation

DGS research featured in UDaily

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A recent publication on Coursey Pond is the subject of a story featured in the University of Delaware's on-line news source, UDaily. The publication stems from research conducted by a team led by DGS staff member A.

New article on cyanobacterial blooms in Coursey Pond published

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DGS staff member Scott Andres along with Bill Ullman and Tye Pettay from the College of Earth, Ocean, and Environment, and Chris Main of the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control had an article “Hydrophysical and Hydrochemical Controls of Cyanobacterial Blooms in Coursey Pond,

DGS joins Project WiCCED

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DGS staff members Rachel McQuiggan and Scott Andres are participants in a new National Science Foundation EPSCoR – funded effort, Water in the Changing Coastal Environment of Delaware (Project WiCCED).

RI81 Characterization of Tidal Wetland Inundation in the Murderkill Estuary

A parameterization of tidal marsh inundation was developed for the 1,200 hectares of tidal marsh along the 12-km reach of the tidal Murderkill River between Frederica and Bowers Beach in Kent County, Delaware. A parsimonious modeling approach was used that bridges the gap between the simple and often used “bathtub model” (instantaneous inundation based on tides in Delaware Bay), and the more complex modeling of shallow overland that results in the wetting and drying of tidal marshes.

Groundwater and Saline Water Intrusion Monitoring Network Infrastructure Improvements: Kent County, Delaware

DGS has begun a three year project to install new water monitoring infrastructure and collect baseline data in Kent County, Delaware. Recommended by the Water Supply Coordinating Council in 2015, the project was funded by a fiscal year 2017 State of Delaware Capital Appropriation.

DGS welcomes James D. Hanes to UD NEWRNet project

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Environmental Sciences student James Hanes (BS 2016) has accepted a Water Resources Center Undergraduate Internship for Fall 2015 to work with A. Scott Andres of DGS, and William Ullman and Christopher Main of the School of Marine Science and Policy at the University of Delaware. James will work on high-frequency environmental data collected by the North East Water Resources Network (NEWRNet) project (http://www.dgs.udel.edu/projects/newrnet-north-east-water-resources-net…), an NSF-EPSCoR funded project that includes investigators and students from the Universities of Delaware, Rhode Island, and Vermont.

NEWRnet - North East Water Resources Network

Project Contact(s)

The North East Water Resources (NEWRnet) consortium of EPSCoR jurisdictions of Delaware (DE), Rhode Island (RI), and Vermont (VT) will create an advanced sensor network in watersheds for gathering high-frequency, spatially-extensive water quality and quantity data and a network of lab and field-based experiments and agent-based models to investigate how to align sensor data and their visualization with utilization by stakeholders. DGS is participating in the watershed sensing network by installing and operating a nitrogen and organic carbon sensor and stream discharge monitoring station in the Murderkill River watershed, and collaborating with the project team to interpret results.