aquifer

Delaware Groundwater Monitoring Network

The Delaware Geological Survey (DGS) currently monitors groundwater levels in a network of wells in Delaware. Long time-series of water levels in major aquifers serve as critical baseline data for resource management and analyses of aquifer response to pumping, climatic variability, drought hazards, seawater intrusion, and interaction with streams and their ecosystems.

Peter P. McLaughlin Jr. presented at 2011 AAPG annual meeting

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Peter P. McLaughlin Jr., of the Delaware Geological Survey, presented "Stratigraphic Architecture of Shallow-Marine Siliciclastic Sequences in an Updip Passive-Margin Setting: Insights into the Miocene Aquifers of the Central Delmarva Peninsula," at the 2011 annual meeting of the American Association of Petroleum Geologists and Society for Sedimentary Geology, April 12, Houston. The presentation was coauthored with graduate student Paul Martin (geological sciences) and with Kenneth G. Miller and James V. Browning (Rutgers University).

DGS releases new geologic map of Rehoboth Beach area

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The Delaware Geological Survey (DGS) has published a new geologic map of the Rehoboth Beach area in eastern Sussex County entitled Geologic Map of the Fairmount and Rehoboth Beach Quadrangles, Delaware. Geologic Map 16 presents the results of research by Kelvin W. Ramsey of the DGS.

RI77 Simulation of Groundwater Flow in Southern New Castle County, Delaware

To understand the effects of projected increased demands on groundwater for water supply, a finite-difference, steady-state, groundwater flow model was used to simulate groundwater flow in the Coastal Plain sediments of southern New Castle County, Delaware. The model simulated flow in the Columbia (water table), Rancocas, Mt. Laurel, combined Magothy/Potomac A, Potomac B, and Potomac C aquifers, and intervening confining beds.

DNREC raises capital request - Sixfold hike includes beach, water projects

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More money would go to projects that make Delaware cleaner, greener and safer under a mostly no-growth budget outlined Monday by the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control. Agency Secretary Collin P. O'Mara asked the Office of Management and Budget for about $35.2 million in general funds for the fiscal year that begins July 1, with health care costs accounting for most of the nearly $2 million increase from the current year.