Turtle Branch Formation

GM15 Geologic Map of the Georgetown Quadrangle, Delaware

The geologic history of the surficial geologic units of the Georgetown Quadrangle is primarily that of deposition of the Beaverdam Formation and its subsequent modification by erosion and deposition of younger stratigraphic units. The age of the Beaverdam Formation is uncertain due to the lack of age-definitive fossils within the unit. Stratigraphic relationships in Delaware indicate that it is no older than late Miocene and no younger than early Pleistocene.

Turtle Branch Formation

One to five feet of gray coarse sand and pebbles overlain by one to ten feet of tan to gray clayey silt to silty clay that is in turn overlain by three to five feet of fine to medium sand. Laterally, finer beds are less common away from Marshyhope Creek and the deposit is dominated by fine to medium sand with scattered beds of coarse to very coarse sand with pebbles. Sands are quartzose with some feldspar and laminae of opaque heavy minerals. Underlies a terrace with elevations ranging from 35 to 50 feet and is interpreted to be fluvial to estuarine in origin. Found in the Marshyhope Creek drainage basin in Kent County and more extensively along the Nanticoke drainage basin in Sussex County. Thickness ranges up to 20 feet closer to the valley of the Marshyhope and thins away from the river.

Coastal Plain Rock Units (Stratigraphic Chart)

The geology of Delaware includes parts of two geologic provinces: the Appalachian Piedmont Province and the Atlantic Coastal Plain Province. The Piedmont occurs in the hilly northernmost part of the state and is composed of crystalline metamorphic and igneous rocks. This chart summarizes the age and distribution of the geologic units that are recognized in the state by the Delaware Geological Survey.

GM14 Geologic Map of Kent County, Delaware

This map shows the surficial geology of Kent County, Delaware at a scale of 1:100,000. Maps at this scale are useful for viewing the general geologic framework on a county-wide basis, determining the geology of watersheds, and recognizing the relationship of geology to regional or county-wide environmental or land-use issues. This map, when combined with the subsurface geologic information, provides a basis for locating water supplies, mapping ground-water recharge areas, and protecting ground and surface water.