Cretaceous Period

146 to 65 mya

GM26 Geologic Map of the Cecilton and Middletown Quadrangles, Delaware

Mapping was conducted using field maps at a scale of 1:12,000 with 2-ft contours. Stratigraphic boundaries drawn at topographic breaks reflect detailed mapping using contours not shown on this map. Most stratigraphic units mapped in stream valleys are projected from subsurface data. Except for a few erosional bluffs, these units are covered by colluvium. This map supersedes Geology of the Middletown-Odessa Area, Delaware: Delaware Geological Survey Geologic Map Series No. 2 (Pickett and Spoljaric, 1971).

OFR52 Results of Groundwater Flow Simulations In the East Dover Area, Delaware

In 2015, staff of the Water Supply Section of the Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control (DNREC) informed the DGS of their concerns about overpumping of the unconfined Columbia aquifer in an area east of Dover (Figure 1). In this area, the City of Dover’s Long Point Road Wellfield (LPRW) and numerous irrigation systems pump water from the shallow Columbia aquifer.

GM24 Geologic Map of the Millington, Clayton and Smyrna Quadrangles, Delaware

The geological history of the surficial units of the Clayton, Smyrna, and the Delaware portion of the Millington Quadrangles are the result of deposition of the Beaverdam Formation and its modification by erosion and deposition of the Columbia Formation during the early Pleistocene. These units were then modified by the Lynch Heights and Scotts Corners Formations as a result of sea-level fluctuations during the middle to late Pleistocene. The geology is further complicated by periglacial activity that produced Carolina Bay deposits in the map area, which modified the land surface.

Celebrate National Fossil Day on October, 15 2014

Date

Did you know that Wednesday, October 15 is National Fossil Day? As part of the American Geological Institute's "Earth Science Week", the National Park Service has established "National Fossil Day" to promote public awareness and stewardship of fossils, as well as to foster a greater appreciation of their scientific and educational values.

RI78 Subsurface Geology of the Area Between Wrangle Hill and Delaware City, Delaware

The geology and hydrology of the area between Wrangle Hill and Delaware City, Delaware, have been the focus of numerous studies since the 1950s because of the importance of the local groundwater supply and the potential environmental impact of industrial activity. In this report, 490 boreholes from six decades of drilling provide dense coverage, allowing detailed characterization of the subsurface geologic framework that controls groundwater occurrence and flow.

Dinosaurs in Delaware?

Only fragmentary remains of dinosaurs have been found in Delaware. All of these have come from the Chesapeake and Delaware Canal, mainly from the spoil piles created by the dredging of the Canal. Various nature groups in Delaware lead trips to the Canal for collecting. Most of the fossils found are those of marine invertebrates (primarily bivalves and gastropods with some remains of sponges, ammonites, and belemnites).