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Clams, Snails, and Squid: Phylum Mollusca, Class Gastropoda

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Gastropods is the group of molluscs that includes the snails. Many types secrete a single coiled or uncoiled shell for protection, and these shells may be found as fossils. Some species spend their lives crawling along the sea floor, eating algae or debris from rocks and bottom sediments. Others are predatory and feed on other molluscs such as clams and oysters by drilling with a "radula" or rasping tongue.

Most of the Cretaceous gastropod fossils from the Canal are internal casts (steinkerns). They are difficult to identify, and most can only be assigned to a family or genus. Gastropods are abundant in the spoils from the Mount Laurel Formation on both sides of the Canal in the vicinity of Reedy Point.

Reference(s): 

Unless otherwise noted, photographs and figures are from DGS Special Publication No. 18, by E. M. Lauginiger, 1988.

Photo Gallery
1. Turritella sp. - specimen from the Marshalltown Formation, also occurs in the Mount Laurel Formation, the Englishtown Formation, and the Merchantville formation <br> 2. Gyrodes sp. - specimen from the Mount Laurel Formation, also occurs in the Marshalltown Formation, the Englishtown Formation, and the Merchantville formation<br>Plus Many More
Beliscalla crideri<br>Calliomphalus sp. - occurs in the Mount Laurel Formation and the Merchantville Formation<br>Rhombopsis marylandicus<br>Cretaceous Gastropod illustrations from Page 16, DGS Special Publication No. 19, 1992.
1. Gyrodes crenata - specimen from the Marshalltown Formation<br>2. Turritella encrinoides - specimen from the Marshalltown Formation<br>3. Turritella trilira - specimen from the Mount Laurel Formation<br>4. Piestochilus bella - specimen fromm the Merchantville Formation<br>Plus Many More
All specimens from the Biggs Farm locality within the Mount Laurel Formation<br>1a,b,c. Calliomphalus americanus<br>2a,b,c. Calliomphalus nudus<br>3a,b. Belliscala crideri<br>4a,b,c. Margaritella sp.<br>5a,b,c. Architectonica cf. A. voragiformis<br>6a,b,c. Calliomphalus sp.<br>Cretaceous Gastropod photographs from Plate VIII, DGS Report of Investigation No. 21, by T. E. Pickett, 1972.
All specimens from the Biggs Farm locality within the Mount Laurel Formation<br>1a,b. Cerithium weeksi<br>2a,b. Morea cancellaria corsicanensis<br>3a,b,c. Cypraea grooti<br>4a,b. Rhombopsis marylandicus<br>5a,b. Acteon? throckmortoni<br>6a,b,c. Goniocylichna sp.<br>7a,b,c. Anisomyon jessupi<br>Cretaceous Gastropod photographs from Plate IX, DGS Report of Investigation No. 21, by T. E. Pickett, 1972.
Gyrodes sp. - occurs in the Mount Laurel Formation, the Marshalltown Formation, the Englishtown Formation, and the Merchantville Formation<br>Calliomphalus sp. - occurs in the Mount Laurel Formation and the Merchantville Formation<br>Xenophora leprosa - occurs in the Mount Laurel Formation and the Merchantville Formation<br>Plus many more