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Site content related to keyword: "Wilmington"

Biotite Tonalite

Sbt

Fine- to medium-grained, equigranular biotite tonalite usually occurring as rounded boulders. Tonalites are leucocratic (15 to 25% modal mafic minerals), light gray to buff on fresh surfaces, and locally contain mafic enclaves with reddish rims, the result of iron hydroxide staining. Possibly intrusive into the Perkins Run Gabbronorite Suite.

Stream Station: Shellpot Creek at Wilmington

USGS 01477800 SHELLPOT CREEK AT WILMINGTON, DE

Station Type: 
Stream
Period of Record: 
1945 to Present
Frequency: 
Monthly
Map County: 
New Castle County
Map Location: 
39.760972,-75.5186944

Meteorological Station: New Castle County Airport

New Castle Airport Meterological Station

Station Type: 
Meteorological
Period of Record: 
1949 to Present
Frequency: 
Monthly
Map County: 
New Castle County
Map Location: 
39.66667,-75.60

Meteorological Station: Porter Reservoir

Porter Reservoir Meteorological Station

Station Type: 
Meteorological
Period of Record: 
1949 to Present
Frequency: 
Monthly
Map County: 
New Castle County
Map Location: 
39.77317,-75.54270

Stream Station: Brandywine Creek at Wilmington

USGS 01481500 BRANDYWINE CREEK AT WILMINGTON, DE

Station Type: 
Stream
Period of Record: 
1946 to Present
Frequency: 
Monthly
Map County: 
New Castle County
Map Location: 
39.769416667,-75.573277

Earthquake Felt Report

Please answer every question to the best of your ability. Either fill in the blanks where called for, or check the response that best describes the event. If a question does not apply or if you don't know how to respond to a particular question, simply skip it and go on to the next. Feel free to add additional information in the Additional Comments box at the bottom of the form.

Exploring the Wilmington Blue Rocks: A GeoAdventure in the Delaware Piedmont

Blue Rocks at Greenway

The Wilmington blue rock, Delaware's most famous rock, underlies both the city of Wilmington and the rolling upland north and east of the city. It is best exposed along the banks of the Brandywine Creek from south of Rockland to the Market Street Bridge. Along this section the Brandywine has carved a deep gorge in the blue rock. The water fall along this four mile gorge is approximately 120', and in the 17th and 18th centuries provided water power for one of the greatest industrial developments in the American colonies. The field trip stops described below are chosen as good examples of blue rock along the Brandywine Creek, and to illustrate how the geology has influenced the development of this area. It is not necessary to visit every stop to become familiar with the blue rocks, you may choose to visit only a few.

OFR2 Preliminary Report on Seismic Events in Northern Delaware

OFR2 Preliminary Report on Seismic Events in Northern Delaware

Earthquakes are an unfamiliar phenomenon in Delaware. Because of the great public and scientific interest in the seismic events that have recently affected northern Delaware, this Open File Report has been prepared to present currently available information concerning the earthquakes and the investigation pursued by the Delaware Geological Survey. This is not a final scientific explanation of the events. To many persons it is shocking to realize that the earth that they regard as stable is, in fact, an active body. The present earth is a product of 4.5 billion years of history, during which time most geologic forces have acted so slowly as to be almost imperceptible. Therefore, sudden movements are disturbing. Earthquakes are the vibrations caused by relatively sudden slippage of deeply buried rocks. Earthquakes occur in a vast range of sizes; many are too small to be felt and others cause great damage. The events in Delaware that are described on these pages were relatively small and, although they warrant further study, which may lead to some precautionary measures, they do not represent cause for alarm.

RI39 Earthquakes in Delaware and Nearby Areas, June 1973 - June 1984

RI39 Earthquakes in Delaware and Nearby Areas, June 1973 - June 1984

Earthquakes in Delaware and surrounding areas have been well documented historically since about the early 1700’s and since 1972 by instrumental records. Most of the Delaware events have occurred in the Wilmington area immediately adjacent to or within rocks of the Wilmington Complex. Since the compilation of earthquakes by Jordan and others (1974) which lists events through May 1974, six felt earthquakes have occurred in northern Delaware and about 20 additional events in Delaware have been recorded on seismographs of the Delaware Geological Survey. Four of the felt events took place from November 1983 through February 1984 and ranged from a magnitude 1.5 to 2.9. The highest intensity for this series of earthquakes was a possible V (Modified Mercalli). Epicenters were generally in the north Wilmington area as determined both instrumentally and by felt reports.

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RI34 Long-Term Chemical-Quality Changes in Selected Delaware Streams

RI34 Long-Term Chemical-Quality Changes in Selected Delaware Streams

Data from three streamflow water-quality stations were statistically analyzed to determine the relationships of the major inorganic chemical constituents to specific conductance and to stream discharge. The results show that ion concentrations varied directly with the flow and with specific conductance. A set of regression equations defining these relationships were derived for each of the three stations: Brandywine Creek at Wilmington, St. Jones River at Dover, and Nanticoke River near Bridgeville.

Earthquake rattles New Jersey and Delaware

Earthquake reported July 1 (credit NBC News 10)

A minor earthquake occurred near Pennsville, N.J., at 9:44 a.m., Wednesday, July 1, according to the Delaware Geological Survey (DGS) at the University of Delaware. The earthquake, which had a magnitude of 2.8, was recorded at the three northern stations of the DGS seismic network.

RI19 Geology of the Fall Zone in Delaware

RI19 Geology of the Fall Zone in Delaware

The complex geologic framework of the Fall Zone in Delaware is primarily caused by diverse structural features present in the crystalline basement rocks that have exerted a considerable influence on the distribution of the overlying sediments of the Coastal Plain.

RI16 Application of Geophysics to Highway Design in the Piedmont of Delaware

RI16 Application of Geophysics to Highway Design in the Piedmont of Delaware

The feasibility of using geophysical techniques in determining the amount of overburden and the nature of the subsurface along a proposed highway was tested in the Piedmont area of Delaware. The area is underlain by crystalline rocks capped by varying amounts of unconsolidated material or regolith. Seismic refraction and surface resistivity methods were used at selected stations and the interpretations were later compared to results from test holes and to the material exposed in road cuts. In general, interpretation of the seismic refraction results compared quite well with test borings and with field observations made after construction was started. Resistivity data were inconclusive in themselves but provided some additional control points when correlated with seismic refraction data. With proper control, it is concluded that such techniques could be useful in the Piedmont of Delaware for highway planning.

HM3 Geohydrology of the Wilmington Area, Delaware

Geohydrology of the Wilmington Area, Delaware

Geology and hydrology of the Wilmington, Delaware area. There are 4 sheets in this series.

GM13 Geologic Map of New Castle County, Delaware

GM13 Geologic Map of New Castle County, Delaware

This map shows the surficial geology of New Castle County, Delaware at a scale of 1:100,000. Maps at this scale are useful for viewing the general geologic framework on a county-wide basis, determining the geology of watersheds, and recognizing the relationship of geology to regional or county-wide environmental or land-use issues. This map, when combined with the subsurface geologic information, provides a basis for locating water supplies, mapping ground-water recharge areas, and protecting ground and surface water. Geologic maps are also used to identify geologic hazards, such as sinkholes and flood-prone areas, to identify sand and gravel resources, and for supporting state, county, and local land-use and planning decisions.

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RI6 Some Observations on the Sediments of the Delaware River South of Wilmington

RI6 Some Observations on the Sediments of the Delaware River South of Wilmington

A series of cores was obtained from a boring in the sediments of the Delaware River near the Delaware Memorial Bridge. The mineralogy, texture and palynology of these samples have been studied. The sedimentary and palynological records suggest that the Delaware River, while swollen with Wisconsin meltwaters, deepened its channel and that subsequent flooding of the mouth of the stream by rising sea waters initiated the deposition of estuarine silts in post-Wisconsin time.