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Site content related to keyword: "Sussex County"

OFR50 Database of Quaternary Coastal Geochronologic Information for the Atlantic and Pacific Coasts of North America (additional information for sites in Peru and Chile)

OFR50 Database of Quaternary Coastal Geochronologic Information for the Atlantic and Pacific Coasts of North America

Open-File Report 50 presents and describes a database of geochronological information for coastal deposits of the US Atlantic and Pacific coasts, as well as for sites from the Pacific coast of South America. This database represents a synthesis of nearly forty years of study conducted by John F. Wehmiller and students in the Department of Geological Sciences, University of Delaware, as well as many collaborating colleagues. The majority of the chronological information in the database is based on amino acid racemization (AAR) data for fossil mollusks obtained from over 1000 collection sites. These chronological data have been used for various mapping, paleoenvironmental, stratigraphic, sea-level, and tectonic studies. In addition to the database itself, 18 on-line supplements containing information related to sample descriptions, sample and collection site photographs, field notes, supporting or related analytical data, and laboratory publications and technical reports are available. Periodic updates and additions will be made where appropriate. The database will be updated regularly to add new data or to complete entries that are currently blank. The instructions provided with the database indicate the date of the latest revision, as well as all revisions after the first release. Some output data from the Amino Acid Racemization Data Base (AARDB) are available at on-line mapping sites or are posted to the NOAA-World Data Center for archival preservation (http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/paleo/aar.html).

Amino Acid Racemization Data Base (AARDB)

Amino Acid Racemization Data  Base (AARDB)

Open-File Report 50 presents and describes a database of geochronological information for coastal deposits of the US Atlantic and Pacific coasts, as well as for sites from the Pacific coast of South America. This database represents a synthesis of nearly forty years of study conducted by John F. Wehmiller and students in the Department of Geological Sciences, University of Delaware, as well as many collaborating colleagues. The majority of the chronological information in the database is based on amino acid racemization (AAR) data for fossil mollusks obtained from over 1000 collection sites. These chronological data have been used for various mapping, paleoenvironmental, stratigraphic, sea-level, and tectonic studies. In addition to the database itself, 18 on-line supplements containing information related to sample descriptions, sample and collection site photographs, field notes, supporting or related analytical data, and laboratory publications and technical reports are available. Periodic updates and additions will be made where appropriate. The database will be updated regularly to add new data or to complete entries that are currently blank. The instructions provided with the database indicate the date of the latest revision, as well as all revisions after the first release. Some output data from the Amino Acid Racemization Data Base (AARDB) are available at on-line mapping sites or are posted to the NOAA-World Data Center for archival preservation (http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/paleo/aar.html).

Milford (Q61A) Seismic Station

The seismic instruments located at the Milford, DE location were adopted by DGS from the Earthscope Transportable Array, which consists of a network of 400 high-quality, portable broadband seismometers that are being placed in temporary sites across the United States. DGS adopted two of these Earthscope stations, P60A in Greenville, DE and Q61A in Milford, DE. This program provided an outstanding opportunity for Delaware to enhance its seismic monitoring capabilities in the future, and upgrade current antiquated equipment.

DGS Geologic Map No. 22 (Sharptown, Laurel, Hebron, and Delmar Quadrangles, Delaware) Dataset

DGS Geologic Map No. 22 (Sharptown, Laurel, Hebron, and Delmar Quadrangles, Delaware) Dataset

This vector data set contains the rock unit polygons for the surficial geology in the Delaware Coastal Plain covered by DGS Geologic Map Series No. 22 (Sharptown, Laurel, Hebron, and Delmar Quadrangles, Delaware). The geological history of the surficial geologic units in western Sussex County is that of deposition of the Beaverdam Formation and its subsequent modification by erosion and deposition related to the sea-level fluctuations during the Pleistocene. The geology reflects this complex history by the cut and fill geometry of the middle and late Pleistocene deposits into the Beaverdam Formation. The geology is further complicated by periglacial activity that produced dune deposits and Carolina Bays in the map area, which modified the land surface.

GM22 Geologic Map of the Sharptown, Laurel, Hebron, and Delmar Quadrangles, Delaware

GM22 Geologic map of the Sharptown, Laurel, Hebron, and Delmar Quadrangles, Delaware

The geological history of the surficial geologic units in western Sussex County is that of deposition of the Beaverdam Formation and its subsequent modification by erosion and deposition related to the sea-level fluctuations during the Pleistocene. The geology reflects this complex history by the cut and fill geometry of the middle and late Pleistocene deposits into the Beaverdam Formation. The geology is further complicated by periglacial activity that produced dune deposits and Carolina Bays in the map area, which modified the land surface. Mapping was conducted using field maps at a scale of 1:12,000 with 2-ft contours. Stratigraphic boundaries drawn at topographic breaks reflect detailed mapping using contours not shown on this map.

Data and Graphs of Water Level Summaries for Wells with 20+ Years or 100+ Observations

Example Hydrograph for DB24-18 - Water Level Summaries for Wells with 20+ Years or 100+ Observations

Ground-water levels are basic information needed for evaluating water conditions and for basic and applied research. For these efforts, water levels are being measured statewide in wells completed in multiple aquifers. Some wells are measured for specific projects, such as the Coastal Aquifers Salinity Project and the Water Conditions program, while other wells are measured so that staff can maintain long term records of ground-water levels for evaluation of trends. Table contains summary data from wells having 100 or more water level observations.

Delaware Geological Survey releases new geologic map of the Trap Pond area

The Delaware Geological Survey (DGS) has published a new geologic map of the Trap Pond and Pittsville areas in central Sussex County titled Geologic Map of the Trap Pond and Pittsville Quadrangles, Delaware.

DGS Geologic Map No. 21 (Trap Pond and Pittsville Quadrangles, Delaware) Dataset

DGS Geologic Map No. 21 (Trap Pond and Pittsville Quadrangles, Delaware) Dataset

This vector data set contains the rock unit polygons for the surficial geology in the Delaware Coastal Plain covered by DGS Geologic Map Series No. 21 (Trap Pond and Pittsville Quadrangles, Delaware). The geological history of the surficial units of the Trap Pond and the Delaware portion of the Pittsville Quadrangle was the result of deposition of the Beaverdam Formation and its subsequent modification by erosion and deposition related to the sea-level fluctuations during the Pleistocene. The geology reflects this complex history by the cut and fill geometry of the Middle and late Pleistocene deposits into the Beaverdam Formation. The geology is further complicated by periglacial activity that produced dune deposits and Carolina Bays in the map area, which modified the land surface. Surficial geologic mapping was conducted using field maps at a scale of 1:12,000 with 2-foot contours. Stratigraphic boundaries drawn at topographic breaks reflect detailed mapping using contours not shown on this map.

GM21 Geologic Map of the Trap Pond and Pittsville Quadrangles, Delaware

GM21 Geologic Map of the Trap Pond and Pittsville Quadrangles, Delaware

The geological history of the surficial units of the Trap Pond and the Delaware portion of the Pittsville Quadrangle was the result of deposition of the Beaverdam Formation and its subsequent modification by erosion and deposition related to the sea-level fluctuations during the Pleistocene. The geology reflects this complex history by the cut and fill geometry of the Middle and late Pleistocene deposits into the Beaverdam Formation. The geology is further complicated by periglacial activity that produced dune deposits and Carolina Bays in the map area, which modified the land surface. Surficial geologic mapping was conducted using field maps at a scale of 1:12,000 with 2-foot contours. Stratigraphic boundaries drawn at topographic breaks reflect detailed mapping using contours not shown on this map.

Delaware Geological Survey releases geologic map of Frankford, Selbyville area

The Delaware Geological Survey (DGS) has published a new geologic map of the Frankford and Selbyville area in eastern Sussex County titled Geologic Map of the Frankford and Selbyville Quadrangles, Delaware.

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Elevation Contours Dataset for Delaware

Elevation Contours Dataset for Delaware

Elevation contours at 2 foot intervals for the State of Delaware were produced for New Castle and Kent Counties based on the 2007 LIDAR) and for Sussex County (based on the 2005 LIDAR.) Data are in line shapefile format.

DGS releases new geologic map of Bethany Beach and Fenwick Island area

The Delaware Geological Survey (DGS) has published a new geologic map of the Bethany Beach and Fenwick Island area in eastern Sussex County titled Geologic Map of the Bethany Beach and Assawoman Bay Quadrangles, Delaware.

Geologic Map 18 presents the results of research by Kelvin W. Ramsey and Jaime Tomlinson of the DGS and is the first web-only map published by the DGS.

GM18 Geologic Map of the Bethany Beach and Assawoman Bay Quadrangles, Delaware

Geologic Map of the Bethany Beach and Assawoman Bay Quadrangles, Delaware

The geologic history of the surficial units of the Bethany Beach and Assawoman Bay Quadrangles is that of deposition of the Beaverdam Formation and its subsequent modification by erosion and deposition related to sea-level fluctuations during the Pleistocene. The geology reflects this complex history onshore, in Indian River Bay and Assawoman Bay, and offshore in the Atlantic Ocean. Erosion during the late Pleistocene sea-level lowstand and ongoing deposition offshore and in Indian River Bay during the Holocene rise in sea level represents the latest of several cycles of erosion and deposition.

Effect of tropical storms Irene and Lee on groundwater levels in well Qb35-08 near Laurel, Delaware

Rapid, significant groundwater recharge occurred in response to tropical storms Irene and Lee.a

Effect of tropical storms Irene and Lee on groundwater levels in well Qb35-08

Plot of groundwater levels, groundwater temperature, and rainfall near Laurel, Delaware

Tropical storms Irene and Lee caused a 9-1/2 foot rise of the water table in western Sussex County near Laurel. Groundwater levels and temperatures in Qb35-08 were collected with an automated pressure-temperature datalogger system. At the same time, rainfall and soil moisture data were recorded by the DEOS Laurel Airport station located approximately 5 miles from the well.

Mapping Tsunami Inundation for the U.S. East Coast

National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program
Project Contact(s):

This project will assess tsunami hazard from the above mentioned and other relevant tsunami sources recently studied in the literature and model the corresponding tsunami inundation in affected US East coast communities. We will combine ocean scale simulations of transoceanic tsunami sources, such as Lisbon 1755 like or Puerto Rico Trench co-seismic events, and CVV collapse, with regional scale simulations of these events, along with the regional scale SMF events, in order to establish the relative degree of hazards for East Coast communities. Detailed inundation studies will be conducted for highest-risk East Coast communities, and results of these studies will be used to construct a first-generation of tsunami inundation maps for the chosen communities.

DGS Geologic Map No. 17 (Harbeson quadrangle) Dataset

DGS Geologic Map No. 17  (Harbeson quadrangle) Dataset

This vector data set contains the rock unit polygons for the surficial geology in the Delaware Coastal Plain covered by DGS Geologic Map Series No. 17 (Harbeson quadrangle). The complex geologic history of the surficial units of the Harbeson Quadrangle is that of deposition of the Beaverdam Formation and its subsequent modification by erosion and deposition related to sea-level fluctuations during the Pleistocene. The geology is further complicated by periglacial activity that produced dune deposits and Carolina Bays scattered throughout the map area.

GM17 Geologic Map of the Harbeson Quadrangle, Delaware

GM17 Geologic Map of the Harbeson Quadrangle, Delaware

The complex geologic history of the surficial units of the Harbeson Quadrangle is one of deposition of the Beaverdam Formation and its subsequent modification by erosion and deposition related to sea-level fluctuations during the Pleistocene. The geology is further complicated by periglacial activity that produced dune deposits and Carolina Bays scattered throughout the map area.

A.Scott Andres was referenced in a News Journal article about Cypress Swamp

In 2000, A. Scott Andres, a senior scientist and hydrologist with the Delaware Geological Survey, released findings that disclosed a unique formation at the swamp.
In geologic time, the swamp isn't that old.
It formed about 22,000 years ago in a fresh-water, cold-climate marsh and boreal forested swamp.
Organic matter started building up and a cold wind blew in silt, clay and sand from nearby dunes and surrounding high ground. More sediment washed in with runoff from streams.
Thin sheets of sand likely spread during times when the land thawed.
Conditions began to change about 10,000 years ago as the climate warmed, forming a temperate-forested swamp, bog and flood plain.
There was more erosion and movement of organic-rich sediment to the fresh-water swamp. Today, it's considered the northernmost Southern forest on the East Coast.