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Site content related to keyword: "New Castle County"

RI18 Geology and Ground Water, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware

RI18 Geology and Ground Water, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware

The results of an intensive ground-water study on University of Delaware lands in the Newark area revealed additional sources of available ground water. Geophysical techniques, air-photo interpretation, studies of existing data, field mapping, test drilling, and pump tests were used as the bases for guiding additional well development. The study, conducted by the Delaware Geological Survey, was a cooperative effort between the University of Delaware and the City of Newark in response to mutual water supply problems. A potential ground-water yield of about 500 gpm was discovered on the University Laird Tract in the Piedmont Province. Ground water available from other locations in the Coastal Plain portion of the study area may total about 175 gpm. However, careful well development and proper well spacing will be necessary to obtain optimum yields.

B1 Ground-Water Problems in Highway Construction and Maintenance

B1 Ground-Water Problems in Highway Construction and Maintenance

This report discusses the occurrence of ground water in relation to certain problems in highway construction and maintenance. These problems are: the subdrainage of roads; quicksand; the arrest of soil creep in road cuts; the construction of lower and larger culverts necessitated by the farm-drainage program; the prevention of failure of bridge abutments and retaining walls; and the watercement ratio of sub-water-table concrete. Although the highway problems and suggested solutions are of general interest, they are considered with special reference to the State of Delaware, in relation to the geology of that State. The new technique of soil stabilization by electroosmosis is reviewed in the hope that it might find application here in road work and pile setting. Field application by the Germans and Russians is reviewed.

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HM3 Geohydrology of the Wilmington Area, Delaware

Geohydrology of the Wilmington Area, Delaware

Geology and hydrology of the Wilmington, Delaware area. There are 4 sheets in this series.

HM2 Geohydrology of the Newark Area, Delaware

Geohydrology of the Newark Area, Delaware

Geology and Hydrology of the Newark, Delaware area. There are 2 sheets in this series.

GM13 Geologic Map of New Castle County, Delaware

GM13 Geologic Map of New Castle County, Delaware

This map shows the surficial geology of New Castle County, Delaware at a scale of 1:100,000. Maps at this scale are useful for viewing the general geologic framework on a county-wide basis, determining the geology of watersheds, and recognizing the relationship of geology to regional or county-wide environmental or land-use issues. This map, when combined with the subsurface geologic information, provides a basis for locating water supplies, mapping ground-water recharge areas, and protecting ground and surface water. Geologic maps are also used to identify geologic hazards, such as sinkholes and flood-prone areas, to identify sand and gravel resources, and for supporting state, county, and local land-use and planning decisions.

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EPSCoR seed grants awarded to environmental researchers

Tom McKenna measuring subsurface temperature along the shoreline of Indian River in Sussex County, Delaware. Photo by Doug Miller

With a focus on environmental issues important to the state, the Delaware National Science Foundation Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (NSF EPSCoR) office has awarded five seed grants to investigators whose projects aim to solve environmental problems in Delaware.

RI10 Pleistocene Channels of New Castle County, Delaware

RI10 Pleistocene Channels of New Castle County, Delaware

Two Pleistocene channel-systems are recognized in New Castle County, (1) a system of straight channels located in the area north of the Chesapeake and Delaware Canal and (2) a braided system occupying the area south of the Canal.

Fluctuations of the flow regime of Pleistocene streams were frequent as evidenced by sedimentary structures and widespread distribution of gravels in the channel deposits.
During high stream flows most of the study area was submerged, while during low flows large interstream areas and islands emerged.

The transporting agents of the Pleistocene sediments were primarily melt-water streams originating below glaciers which at times advanced to within 100 miles north of New Castle County. Thus, the age of the deposits is thought to be glacial, but there is no indication as to which glacial stage they belong. However, the channels appear to have been formed contemporaneously by a major distributary system.

RI9 Ground-Water Levels in Delaware January, 1962 - June, 1966

RI9 Ground-Water Levels in Delaware January, 1962 - June, 1966

This report deals with fluctuations in nine observation wells during the period 1960 - 1966. These wells are part of a state-wide ground-water monitoring network and are located in areas of little or no pumping. Eight of the wells respond to water-table conditions; the ninth well appears to reflect artesian conditions.
Although precipitation throughout Delaware was generally below average during the period covered by this report, annual average water levels declined very little in the wells reported on here. There is some evidence, however, for a lowering of water-table levels by three to four feet during the period 1960 - 1962.

RI8 Evaluation of the Water Resources of Delaware

RI8 Evaluation of the Water Resources of Delaware

At present, Delaware has an abundance of water for the foreseeable future, but is already faced with water problems in some municipalities. These can only be resolved satisfactorily through complete evaluation of the State's water resources and the establishment of a coordinated program of water management.

RI7 An Invertebrate Macrofauna from the Upper Cretaceous of Delaware

RI7 An Invertebrate Macrofauna from the Upper Cretaceous of Delaware

Recent erosion along the Chesapeake and Delaware Canal has exposed an unusually rich Upper Cretaceous fossiliferous outcrop at the Biggs Farm, near the eastern end of the Canal. Some III species of mollusks representing 72 genera have been identified. Coelenterata, Porifera, Annelida, Brachiopoda, Crustacea, and a few fragmentary vertebrate remains have also been found. Five species are being described as new, and there are 54 new records for the Cretaceous of Delaware.

The preservation of the material suggests that the animals lived on a sandy bottom in water between 50 and 100 feet in depth, possibly near the mouth of a bay.

Inasmuch as there is a mixing of some species characteristic of the Matawan Group and other species characteristic of the Monmouth Group, it is believed that the fauna at this locality lies near the Matawan-Monmouth boundary, perhaps in the lower part of the Monmouth Group.

RI6 Some Observations on the Sediments of the Delaware River South of Wilmington

RI6 Some Observations on the Sediments of the Delaware River South of Wilmington

A series of cores was obtained from a boring in the sediments of the Delaware River near the Delaware Memorial Bridge. The mineralogy, texture and palynology of these samples have been studied. The sedimentary and palynological records suggest that the Delaware River, while swollen with Wisconsin meltwaters, deepened its channel and that subsequent flooding of the mouth of the stream by rising sea waters initiated the deposition of estuarine silts in post-Wisconsin time.