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Site content related to keyword: "Lewes"

Stream and Tide Gage Data for Hurricane Sandy

GOES Satellite Image of Hurricane Sandy (Image provided by NASA)

Hurricane Sandy was a major storm event for the tidal areas of Delaware. As a part of the mission of the Delaware Geological Survey, we have compiled preliminary data related to Delaware tide and stream levels related to the Hurricane Sandy and compared them with previous flooding records.

Coast Day fun for kids - Families can enjoy fun activities about marine science at Coast Day in Lewes

Beach-loving kids can follow their fascination with the sea to Coast Day on Oct. 7 from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the University of Delaware’s Hugh R. Sharp Campus in Lewes. The family-friendly event features fun activities that tap children’s natural curiosity about the ocean.

“This year’s theme is ‘Checking in on Our Coast,’” said event chair John Ewart of Delaware Sea Grant, which presents the event with UD’s College of Earth, Ocean, and Environment. “Kids can use their senses to explore marine science — and check out the tools our researchers use to do so, too.”

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The Storm of '62

Kelvin Ramsey was quoted in the special section of Coastal Point, which featured the 50th anniversary of the Ash Wednesday 1962 nor'easter

Scott Andres made a presentation at the Center for the Inland Bays

Scott Andres of the Delaware Geological Survey made a presentation titled "Results of Field and Lab Experiments on High Rate Land Application of Wastewater -- RIBS -- Update on Current Research," at the Center for the Inland Bays, Scientific and Technical Advisory Committee, May 6, Lewes, Del.

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Meteorological Station: City of Lewes

City of Lewes Meteorological Station

Station Type: 
Meteorological
Period of Record: 
1949 to Mar 2011
Frequency: 
Monthly
Map County: 
Sussex County
Map Location: 
38.769555,-75.138527

RI65 Wellhead Protection Area Delineations for the Lewes-Rehoboth Beach Area, Delaware

RI65 Wellhead Protection Area Delineations for the Lewes-Rehoboth Beach Area, Delaware

Water supply in the rapidly developing Lewes and Rehoboth Beach areas of coastal Sussex County in Delaware is provided by more than 80 individual public water wells and hundreds of domestic wells. Significant concerns exist about the future viability of the ground-water resource in light of contamination threats and loss of recharge areas. As part of Delaware's Source Water and Assessment Protection Program, wellhead protection areas (WHPAs) were delineated for the 15 largest public supply wells operated by three public water systems. The WHPAs are derived from analysis of results of dozens of steady-state ground-water flow simulations. The simulations were performed with a Visual MODFLOW-based 6-layer, 315,600-node model coupled with GIS-based data on land cover, ground-water recharge and resource potentials, and other base maps and aerial imagery. Because the model was operated under steady-state conditions, long-term average pumping rates were used in the model. The flow model includes four boundary types (constant head, constant flux, head-dependant flux, and no flow), with layers that represent the complex hydrogeologic conditions based on aquifer characterizations. The model is calibrated to within a 10% normalized root mean squared error of the observed water table.

RI48 Geologic And Hydrologic Studies of the Oligocene - Pleistocene Section near Lewes, Delaware

RI48 Geologic And Hydrologic Studies of the Oligocene - Pleistocene Section near Lewes, Delaware

Borehole Oh25-02, located about 3 miles southwest of Lewes, Delaware, ends at a total depth of 1,337 ft in a mid-Oligocene glauconitic silt unit. It penetrated 317 ft of glauconitic sands and silts between the base of the Calvert Formation at a depth of 1,020 ft and total depth. A hiatus at 1,218 ft separates an outer neritic lower Miocene interval (Globorotalia kugleri Zone) above it from a deep upper bathyal mid-Oligocene (G. opima opima Zone) section below; the lower section is characterized by abundant large uvigerinid benthic foraminiferal species representing the transition from Uvigerina tumeyensis to Tiptonina nodifera. Similar uvigerinid assemblages identify the mid-Oligocene unit in boreholes near Bridgeville and Milford, Delaware; Cape May, New Jersey; and Ocean City, Maryland. Updip from these boreholes, the Calvert Formation, of latest Oligocene-middle Miocene age in Delaware, unconformably overlies middle Eocene glauconitic sands of the Piney Point Formation. The juxtaposition of the downdip mid-Oligocene rocks against the updip middle Eocene rocks can best be explained by a fault between the two regions.

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B8 Water Resources of Sussex County, Delaware

B8 Water Resources of Sussex County, Delaware

Sussex County is in the Atlantic Coastal Plain. Its relatively flat, featureless topography is characterized by two terrace-like surfaces; the lower one rises from sea level to about 40 feet above sea level, and the higher one rises inland from 40 to about 60 feet above sea level. Peculiar landforms of low relief, broad ovals, similar to the "Carolina bays," and to the "New Jersey basins" are common on the sandy flat divides in Sussex County. Hydrologically, they are sites of much ground-water discharge, by evapotranspiration, from meadow and marsh of lush vegetation.

GM12 Geology of the Lewes and Cape Henlopen Quadrangles, Delaware

GM12 Geology of the Lewes and Cape Henlopen Quadrangles, Delaware

The surficial geology of the Lewes and Cape Henlopen quadrangles reflects the geologic history of the Delaware Bay estuary and successive high and low stands of sea levels during the Quaternary. The subsurface Beaverdam Formation was deposited as part of a fluvial-estuarine system during the Pliocene, the sediments of which now form the core of the Delmarva Peninsula. Following a period of glacial outwash during the early Pleistocene represented by the Columbia Formation found to the northwest of the map area (Ramsey, 1997), the Delaware River and Estuary developed their current positions. The Lynch Heights and Scotts Corners Formations (Ramsey, 1993, 1997, 2001) represent shoreline and estuarine deposits associated with high stands of sea level during the middle to late Pleistocene on the margins of the Delaware Estuary. In the map area, the Lynch Heights Formation includes relict spit and dune deposits at the ancestral intersection of the Atlantic Coast and Delaware Bay systems, similar in geomorphic position to the modern Cape Henlopen.

Map Scale: 
24,000

RI13 The Occurrence of Saline Ground Water in Delaware Aquifers

RI13 The Occurrence of Saline Ground Water in Delaware Aquifers

The location of the fresh-salt-water-boundary in the deeper aquifers of Delaware is related mainly to head values. Near coastal areas, dynamic conditions may prevail that affect the interface position within shallow aquifers open to the sea. Holocene and Columbia sands which form Delaware's shallow water-table aquifers contain brackish water in scattered coastal areas while brackish water in the artesian aquifers is found at various depths. Water from Chesapeake Group sediments (Miocene) is fresh in Kent County but is salty in poorly defined areas of Sussex County. The interface in the Piney Point Formation (Eocene) lies just north of Milford and extends in a northeast-southwesterly direction across the State. Brackish water exists in the Magothy and Potomac formations of Cretaceous age a few miles south of Middletown. Heavy pumping near sources of brackish water should be avoided for the present. Proper location of monitoring wells is necessary for detection of future chloride movement.