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Site content related to keyword: "Kent County"

Data and Graphs of Water Level Summaries for Wells with 20+ Years or 100+ Observations

Example Hydrograph for DB24-18 - Water Level Summaries for Wells with 20+ Years or 100+ Observations

Ground-water levels are basic information needed for evaluating water conditions and for basic and applied research. For these efforts, water levels are being measured statewide in wells completed in multiple aquifers. Some wells are measured for specific projects, such as the Coastal Aquifers Salinity Project and the Water Conditions program, while other wells are measured so that staff can maintain long term records of ground-water levels for evaluation of trends. Table contains summary data from wells having 100 or more water level observations.

Elevation Contours Dataset for Delaware

Elevation Contours Dataset for Delaware

Elevation contours at 2 foot intervals for the State of Delaware were produced for New Castle and Kent Counties based on the 2007 LIDAR) and for Sussex County (based on the 2005 LIDAR.) Data are in line shapefile format.

System alerts bay communities of coming floods

John Callahan, Kevin Brinson and Dan Leathers test a station in the Coastal Flood Monitoring System.

Launched in 2011, the Coastal Flood Monitoring System (CFMS) supports planning and emergency management for Delaware Bay communities before and during coastal storm or high tide events. It was developed by John Callahan, a research associate for the Delaware Geological Survey (DGS), and Kevin Brinson, a researcher for the Delaware Environmental Observing System (DEOS). The Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control and the Delaware EPSCoR program funded the project.

Monitoring our water - Delaware Geological Survey improving groundwater monitoring efforts with new wells, sampling

Scott Andres examines sediment samples extracted from more than 500 feet underground for clues about the amount and quality of water available in central Delaware.

Delaware Geological Survey improving groundwater monitoring efforts with new wells, sampling. Scientists are digging for answers about the amount and quality of water available underground in central Delaware, where ongoing development will put increasing demands on water supplies in the coming decade.

The Delaware Geological Survey (DGS) is installing 7,700 feet of wells at eight sites in southern New Castle and northern Kent counties to improve groundwater-monitoring efforts, supported by a $600,000 grant from the Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control (DNREC). Groundwater is the primary source of drinking water south of the Chesapeake and Delaware Canal, and populations there are projected to continue expanding.

A flood of innovation - UD and the state work together to mitigate coastal flooding in Delaware

Two state agencies, the Delaware Emergency Management Agency (DEMA) and the Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control (DNREC), collaborated with the University of Delaware and the Delaware Geological Survey (DGS) and found an answer in the Delaware Environmental Observing System (DEOS). DEOS was created in 2003 as a real-time, regional monitoring system that provides data on weather conditions, water levels, snow depth, and various other environmental factors obtained from automated weather stations in and around the state.

DGS issues report on groundwater modeling in southern New Castle County

The Delaware Geological Survey (DGS) released a new technical report entitled Simulation of Groundwater Flow in Southern New Castle County, Delaware, which was prepared by Changming He and A. Scott Andres of the DGS.

DGS Report of Investigations No. 77 is a preliminary step in developing a detailed understanding of the subsurface hydrology and evaluating groundwater availability in major aquifer systems beneath southern New Castle County and parts of northern Kent County, which are expected to have greater demands for groundwater in the next 20 years due to population growth.

DGS Participates in the Delaware Estuary Conference

Partnership for the Delaware Estuary

DGS researchers Tom McKenna and John Callahan presented some of their work at the Delaware Estuary Science and Environmental Summit at Cape May, NJ, and hosted by the Partnership for the Delaware Estuary.

DNREC raises capital request - Sixfold hike includes beach, water projects

More money would go to projects that make Delaware cleaner, greener and safer under a mostly no-growth budget outlined Monday by the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control. Agency Secretary Collin P. O'Mara asked the Office of Management and Budget for about $35.2 million in general funds for the fiscal year that begins July 1, with health care costs accounting for most of the nearly $2 million increase from the current year.

The Delaware Water Conditions Summary

The Water Conditions Summary is an online monthly summary of water conditions in Delaware. Principal factors in determining water conditions are precipitation, streamflow, and groundwater levels in aquifers. Data from rain gages, stream gages, and observation wells located throughout Delaware have been collected and compiled since the 1960s by the Delaware Geological Survey. These data are displayed as hydrographs and are also available for download. In general, water is abundant in Delaware, but supply is restricted by natural geologic conditions in some areas, by contamination in others, and is dependent on precipitation.

Deal Formation

Td

It is a clayey, calcareous, shelly, glauconitic (10-20 percent) silt. Its colors range from greenish-gray and gray-green to brownish-gray and light gray. It is rich in calcareous and siliceous microfossils. The matrix mineralogy shows a high calcite component, except in the lower part of the formation which is within a calcite dissolution interval. In the lower half of the formation quartz is predominant.

A Coastal Flood Monitoring System for Delaware

Flooding at Kitts Hummock after the Mother's Day Storm 2008
Project Contact(s):

During the last two decades, storms such as Hurricanes Katrina and Ike along the Gulf of Mexico and Floyd and Hugo along the Atlantic Coast of the United States have resulted in significant loss of life, injuries, and property damages exceeding well over 100 billion dollars. Much of the damage associated with these and other tropical and extra-tropical weather systems is associated with severe coastal flooding. The purpose of this project is to develop a real-time coastal flood monitoring and warning system for the coastal communities in Kent County, Delaware. This system will serve as a prototype for similar early-warning systems, which may then be applied along the entire Delaware coast.

Cat Hill Formation

Tcat

Yellowish-brown to light-gray, medium to fine sand with thin beds and laminae of medium to coarse sand and scattered pebbles (B) that grades downward into bioturbated, gray, very fine sand to silt (A). Rare beds of light-gray to red silty clay are found near the contact with the overlying Beaverdam Formation. Laminae of opaque heavy minerals are present in the upper sands. Laminae of very fine organic particles are found in the lower sand as well as laminae to thin beds of coarse sand to gravel. The burrows in the lower sand are clay lined, and in some intervals, the sediment is completely bioturbated to the extent that no sedimentary structures are preserved. Sand is primarily quartz with less than 5% feldspar and a trace to less than 1% mica (in the very fine sand to silt). Glauconite is present only in trace amounts. Fragments of lignite are common to rare in the organic laminae. Interpreted to be a late Miocene, very shallow marine to marginal marine (shoreface) deposit (McLaughlin et al., 2008). About 100 to 120 ft thick in the Georgetown Quadrangle.

DGS Geologic Map No. 15 (Georgetown Quadrangle) Dataset

DGS Geologic Map No. 15 (Georgetown Quadrangle) Dataset

This vector data set contains the rock unit polygons for the surficial geology in the Delaware Coastal Plain covered by DGS Geologic Map No. 15 (Geologic Map of the Georgetown Quadrangle, Delaware). The geologic history of the surficial geologic units of the Georgetown Quadrangle is primarily that of deposition of the Beaverdam Formation and its subsequent modification by erosion and deposition of younger stratigraphic units. The age of the Beaverdam Formation is uncertain due to the lack of age-definitive fossils within the unit but is thought to be between late Pliocene to early Pleistocene in age. Refer to Ramsey, 2010 (DGS Report of Investigations No. 76) for details regarding the stratigraphic units.

To facilitate the GIS community of Delaware and to release the geologic map of the Georgetown Quadrangle with all cartographic elements (including geologic symbology, text, etc.) in a form usable in a GIS, we have released this digital coverage of DGS Geological Map 15. The update of earlier work and mapping of new units is important not only to geologists, but also to hydrologists who wish to understand the distribution of water resources, to engineers who need bedrock information during construction of roads and buildings, to government officials and agencies who are planning for residential and commercial growth, and to citizens who are curious about the bedrock under their homes. Formal names are assigned to all rock units according to the guidelines of the 1983 North American Stratigraphic Code (NACSN, 1983).

Stream Station: Marshyhope Creek near Adamsville

USGS 01488500 MARSHYHOPE CREEK NEAR ADAMSVILLE, DE

Station Type: 
Stream
Period of Record: 
April 1943 to March 1969, October 1971 to December 2002, October 2004 to Present
Frequency: 
Monthly
Map County: 
Kent County
Map Location: 
38.84969,-75.67311

Water Conditions Summary Station Map

Map displaying all observing stations monitored by DGS for current and long-term conditions as part of the Water Conditions Summary for Delaware.

Groundwater Station: DGS Well Jd14-01

DGS Well Jd14-01

Station Type: 
Groundwater
Period of Record: 
1972 to present
Frequency: 
Quarterly
Map County: 
Kent County
Map Location: 
39.159999, -75.532501

Groundwater Station: DGS Well Id55-01

DGS Well Id55-01

Station Type: 
Groundwater
Period of Record: 
1969 to present
Frequency: 
Quarterly
Map County: 
Kent County
Map Location: 
39.172599, -75.509902