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Site content related to keyword: "Harbeson"

DGS Geologic Map No. 17 (Harbeson quadrangle) Dataset

DGS Geologic Map No. 17  (Harbeson quadrangle) Dataset

This vector data set contains the rock unit polygons for the surficial geology in the Delaware Coastal Plain covered by DGS Geologic Map Series No. 17 (Harbeson quadrangle). The complex geologic history of the surficial units of the Harbeson Quadrangle is that of deposition of the Beaverdam Formation and its subsequent modification by erosion and deposition related to sea-level fluctuations during the Pleistocene. The geology is further complicated by periglacial activity that produced dune deposits and Carolina Bays scattered throughout the map area.

GM17 Geologic Map of the Harbeson Quadrangle, Delaware

GM17 Geologic Map of the Harbeson Quadrangle, Delaware

The complex geologic history of the surficial units of the Harbeson Quadrangle is one of deposition of the Beaverdam Formation and its subsequent modification by erosion and deposition related to sea-level fluctuations during the Pleistocene. The geology is further complicated by periglacial activity that produced dune deposits and Carolina Bays scattered throughout the map area.

Map Scale: 
24.000

DGS releases new geologic map of Georgetown area

The Delaware Geological Survey (DGS) has published a new geologic map of the Georgetown area in eastern Sussex County entitled Geologic Map of the Georgetown Quadrangle, Delaware. Geologic Map No. 15 presents the results of research by Kelvin W. Ramsey of the DGS.

GM15 Geologic Map of the Georgetown Quadrangle, Delaware

GM15 Geologic Map of the Georgetown Quadrangle, Delaware

The geologic history of the surficial geologic units of the Georgetown Quadrangle is primarily that of deposition of the Beaverdam Formation and its subsequent modification by erosion and deposition of younger stratigraphic units. The age of the Beaverdam Formation is uncertain due to the lack of age-definitive fossils within the unit. Stratigraphic relationships in Delaware indicate that it is no older than late Miocene and no younger than early Pleistocene. Regional correlations based on similarities of depositional style, stratigraphic position, and sediment textures suggest that it is likely late Pliocene in age; correlative with the Bacons Castle Formation of Virginia (Ramsey, 1992, 2010).

Map Scale: 
24,000