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DGS Annual Report

DGS Annual Report of Programs and Activities.

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Site content related to keyword: "Delaware"

SP23 Earthquake Basics

SP23 Earthquake Basics

This report provides a brief overview of the causes of earthquakes, how earthquakes are measured, and a glossary of earthquake terminology.

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SP17 The Delaware Geological Survey: The Formative Years, 1951-1969

SP17 The Delaware Geological Survey: The Formative Years, 1951-1969

Emphasis is placed herein on the years of Dr. Groot's leadership of the Survey. The remarkable work of James C. Booth in the last century is acknowledged but has elsewhere been entered in history. Some continuing activities of the Survey after 1969 are noted together with comments of an experienced observer; this current period may someday receive the attention of a recorder having the enhanced perspective of time.

SP8 Memoir of the Geological Survey of the State of Delaware

SP8 Memoir of the Geological Survey of the State of Delaware

The following report of the geological survey of the state of Delaware, conducted in the years 1837 and 1838, embraces all the observations and examinations which were made during the continuance of the survey, including those contained in the first and second annual reports, already laid before the legislature.

Minerals in Delaware

Minerals in Delaware

The description and identification of minerals in Delaware dates from the first quarter of the nineteenth century. During this time, both geologists and amateur mineral collectors have published on the minerals of Delaware including George Carpenter, Issac Lea, James Booth, and Henry duPont.

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Introduction to the Hydrogeology of Delaware

Brandywine Creek

Delaware’s water, both ground and surface, is one of its most important natural resources. As Delaware’s lead earth science agency, the Delaware Geological Survey provides information to inform and educate resource managers and the public to better understand and manage our water resources.

Delaware State Mineral - Sillimanite

Sillimanite - Delaware State Mineral

In 1977, the Delaware General Assembly, acting on a proposal by the Delaware Mineralogical Society, established sillimanite as the Delaware State Mineral. This act recognizes the geological and mineralogical significance of the large masses of this mineral found as boulders at Brandywine Springs, an occurrence that was recognized as important in the 6th (1892) edition of Dana's System of Mineralogy. The Brandywine Springs boulders are remarkable for their size and purity. The sillimanite has a fibrous texture reminiscent of wood and could potentially be cut into cabochon gems showing a chatoyant ("cat's eye") effect. Sillimanite is not mined as an ore or raw material in Delaware.

Delaware State Fossil - The Belemnite

Delaware State Fossil (Belemnitella <i>americana</i>)

On July 2, 1996, Belemnitella americana was named as the official fossil of Delaware. The Martin Luther King, Jr. Elementary School (Wilmington) third grade Quest students of Kathy Tidball suggested honoring the ancient and noble belemnite as our State fossil.(Delaware Code Title 29 § 314)

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The Geology of Delaware

The Geology of Delaware is an online resource for information about the geology and hydrogeology of Delaware. Information on these pages is explained in general terms although common geologic terminology is used. This book covers the major important factors in Delaware geology as well as latest research. Additional information is provided at the bottom of some pages and on the last page of the book, More Information.

The Delaware DataMIL

The Delaware DataMIL

The Delaware DataMIL collects, maps, and serves Delaware's Spatial Data Framework, or basic map datasets, on which state agencies, local and county governments, academic GIS users, and the private sector can use for their own needs. DataMIL also provides access for Delaware topographic maps that replace the old USGS 7.5-minute topographic maps for the State.

Rapid infiltration basin systems -- research introduction

A. Scott Andres, senior scientist with the Delaware Geological Survey, presented "Rapid Infiltration Basin Systems -- Research Introduction" to the Delaware Clean Water Advisory Council on June 24 in Dover, Del.

DGS Staff Directory

DGS staff directory lists all full-time science and administrative personnel. It includes interactive areas of interest and a comprehensive listing of each staff members' projects, publications, and activities.

Kenneth D. Woodruff, Associate Director (1966 - 1992)

Kenneth D. Woodruff, Associate Director (1966 - 1992)
Date: May 1966 - Jan 1992

Kenneth D. Woodruff, Associate Director (1966 - 1992)

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About the Delaware Geological Survey

The DGS Building, University of Delaware, Newark Campus

The Delaware Geological Survey (DGS) is a science-based, public-service-driven Delaware state agency at the University of Delaware (UD) that conducts geologic and hydrologic research, service, and exploration for the benefit of the citizens of the First State. The mission of the DGS is to provide objective earth science information, advice, and service to its stakeholders, the citizens, policy makers, industries, and educational institutions of Delaware.

The Second Delaware Geological Survey

The Second Delaware Geological Survey
Date: Jun 1951

The Survey started its investigations in July 1951 with Johan J. Groot as State Geologist and Lecturer, later Professor of Geology, and Louis P. Vlangas as Geological Field Assistant. The University provided office space, which was shared with the Department of Geography. The cooperative program with the USGS, begun prior to 1951, was continued. Studies of the geology of New Castle County and of the ground-water resources of the Newark area were initiated, the latter with financial support of that city.

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First State Geology Vol.1, No.1 is published

First State Geology Vol.1, No.1 - Summer 1983
Date: May 1983

First State Geology offers news on Delaware geology and water resources, on recent DGS publications, and on DGS staff activities as a twice-per-year newsletter publication.

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RI20 Nitrate Contamination of the Water-Table Aquifer in Delaware

RI20 Nitrate Contamination of the Water-Table Aquifer in Delaware

The increasing population of the State of Delaware is placing severe strains on the quality of ground water in the water-table aquifer by disposing of septic-tank effluent in the soil. At the same time the water resources of this aquifer are being used in greater amounts. The permeable water-table aquifer, containing reserves of 331 million gallons per day, is very vulnerable to contamination by objectionable or toxic fluids and dissolved substances placed on or in the soil.

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RI15 General Ground-Water Quality in Fresh-Water Aquifers of Delaware

RI15 General Ground-Water Quality in Fresh-Water Aquifers of Delaware

Information on ground-water quality in Delaware has become critical for three reasons: (1) increased water demand, (2) need for a better understanding of ground-water flow patterns, (3) need for a "base" against which future quality changes can be measured. Analyses of about 150 water quality samples from wells show that Delaware's fresh ground waters are suitable for most purposes. High iron content may occur, however, in wells tapping the Columbia and the Potomac formations. Overall, total dissolved solids in Delaware aquifers are relatively low except in the Cheswold and Frederica aquifers (Miocene), and possibly parts of the Piney Point Formation (Eocene).

RI14 Delaware Clay Resources

RI14 Delaware Clay Resources

Forty-eight samples of Delaware clays were collected and tested jointly by the Delaware Geological Survey and the U. S. Bureau of Mines. Clays potentially useful for face brick are common. The nonmarine Cretaceous Potomac Formation is a potential economic clay at virtually all locations sampled. Some Miocene and Pleistocene clays are also possibilities for brick clays. Other Potomac clays are potential sources for glazed tile, sewer pipe, refractory brick, and stoneware. Coastal marsh clays, frequently containing much organic debris, are potential source material for lightweight aggregate used in lightweight, strong concrete products. Lightweight aggregate has the potential for augmenting dwindling reserves of crushed stone and gravel aggregate.

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Delaware 7.5-minute USGS Quadrangle Index

Delaware 7.5-minute USGS Quadrangle Index

A geospatial data file containing all polygons representing the areal extent of 7.5-minute topographic quadrangles within and surrounding Delaware.