Delaware

DGS Reinvents Itself on the Web

The Delaware Geological Survey has unveiled a new version of their public web site. Although many of the technologies employed are consistent with modern web standards, giving the user a familiar feel and comfort level, particular attention has been paid to information and the retrieval of it. The site is designed to encourage users to explore content they wouldn't other wise read.

DGS unveils new website

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The Delaware Geological Survey has unveiled a new version of their public web site. Although many of the technologies employed are consistent with modern web standards, giving the user a familiar feel and comfort level, particular attention has been paid to information and the retrieval of it.

SP11 Instructions for Preparation of Delaware Geological Survey Data Base Schedules

The DGS, in response to the needs for efficient storage, manipulation,retrieval, and report-generating capability, has proceeded with the conversion of the paper file data base to an integrated automated geologic, hydrologic, and mineral resource management information system. It is necessary to organize data in a systematic and standardized fashion for efficient entry into the automated system. To accomplish this, the DGS has made major revisions in the data recording and filing systems.

A Generalized Geologic Map of Delaware

The Delaware Geological Survey (DGS) has published the surficial geology of the state of Delaware at a scale of 1:100,000 for New Castle and Kent counties (Ramsey, 2005, 2007). Maps at this scale are useful for viewing general geologic framework on a county-wide basis, determining the geology of watersheds, and recognizing the relationship of geology to county-wide environmental or land-use issues. These maps, when combined with subsurface geologic information, provide a basis for locating water supplies, mapping ground-water recharge areas, and protecting ground and surface water. Geologic maps are also used to identify geologic hazards, such as flood-prone areas, to identify sand and gravel resources, and for supporting state, county, and local land-use planning decisions. Portions of Sussex County have previously been mapped at 1:24,000-scale.

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Web-Delivered Application for Hydrogeologic Data

Project Contact(s)

This project is designed to deliver, by web-based technologies, the most commonly available and requested geologic and hydrologic information used in hydrologic studies required by regulation and ordinance and used by state agencies to support resource-management decisions. Available information can be associated with points or areas. Information associated with points includes descriptive logs, geophysical logs, raw and interpreted groundwater levels, aquifer and geologic unit identification, and hydraulic characteristics of wells. Information associated with areas is either in the form of raster-based (grid) data or polygons. Examples of raster-based data include water-table depths and elevations, tops and thicknesses of geologic and aquifer units, and aquifer transmissivity. Examples of polygons include surficial geology and groundwater recharge potential.

The intent of developing a web-technology enabled system is to provide a more intuitive and comprehensive toolset for locating, quickly viewing, and downloading the desired information in an efficient, extensible, and familiar manner.

Presentation on groundwater availability

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John Talley, of the Delaware Geological Survey, made a presentation titled “Groundwater Availability, Trends in Water Use, and Potential Conflicts” at the Pickle Packers International spring meeting, Philadelphia, April 15.

A GIS screening tool for assessing suitability of land for RIBS

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Scott Andres and Edward Walther, of the Delaware Geological Survey, presented "Development and Application of a GIS Screening Tool for Assessing Suitability of Land for Rapid Infiltration Basin Systems" at the National Ground Water Association Summit, Denver, April 12-15. Andres also participated in a panel discussion co-sponsored by the U.S. Subcommittee on Groundwater, "National Groundwater Monitoring Network: Listening Session."

DGS Cooperative and Joint-Funded Programs

The DGS is, by statute, the state agency responsible for entering into agreements with its counterpart federal agencies, including the U.S. Geological Survey, the USGS Office of Minerals Information (formerly the U.S. Bureau of Mines), and the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement (formerly the U. S. Minerals Management Service), and for administering all cooperative programs of the State with these agencies. The DGS also works with many in-state and out-of-state partner agencies and organizations.