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DGS Annual Report

DGS Annual Report of Programs and Activities.

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Site content related to keyword: "Delaware"

Water Conditions Summary Station Map

Map displaying all observing stations monitored by DGS for current and long-term conditions as part of the Water Conditions Summary for Delaware.

Presentation on land application of waste water

Scott Andres of the Delaware Geological Survey presented “Land application of wastewater” and participated in a panel discussion of land use effects on water resources at a forum sponsored by the Sussex County League of Women Voters in Georgetown, Del., Jan 13.
Also, Andres presented “Groundwater Resources and Ag Water Use in Delaware” at the irrigation session during Delaware Ag Week in Harrington, Del., Jan 20.

Real-time Data and Graphs from USGS

Real-time Data and Graphs from USGS

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Real-time Data and Graphs from DEOS

Below are graphs and charts of current environmental data from the Delaware Environmental Observing System (DEOS.) Select a station below to near see real-time data tables and graphs.

Hydrologic Information for Delaware

Brandywine Creek in Northern Delaware

Hydrogeologic data and information for Delaware. This includes the Water Conditions Report, groundwater well data, links to real-time data from DEOS and USGS, and other general information about Delaware's hydrogeology.

Delaware Geological Survey Radiocarbon Database

Delaware Geological Survey Radiocarbon Database

Radiocarbon dates from 231 geologic samples from the offshore, coastal, and upland regions of Delaware have been compiled along with their corresponding locations and other supporting data. These data now form the Delaware Geological Survey Radiocarbon Database. The dates range from a few hundred years to approximately 40,000 yrs (40 ka) BP (before present). All dates younger than about 18,000 yrs have been calibrated using the method of Stuiver and Reimer (1993). A plot of the dates versus the elevations of the samples shows four distinct groupings: those associated with the rise of sea level during the Holocene, those from the uplands, those in modem stream valleys, and those older than the detectable range of present radiocarbon techniques. A fifth group of samples in the 20-38 ka range and from below present sea level are ambiguous and were previously used as evidence for a mid-Wisconsinan high sea stand (Milliman and Emery, 1968).

Creation of the Delaware WARC (to become DNREC)

Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control (DNREC)
Date: Jul 1966

New legislation in 1966 created the Delaware Water and Air Resources Commission (WARC), eventually to become the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control (DNREC).

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Senate Bill 129 Created the Delaware Geological Survey June 4, 1951

The Second Delaware Geological Survey
Date: Jun 1951

Governor Elbert N. Carvel promoted legislation, with regard to water resources, with Seante Bill 129 which created the Delaware Geological Survey, introduced by State Senator William O. Cubbage in the 116 General Assembly and signed into law by Governor Carvel on June 4, 1951.

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Annual Report of Programs & Activities 2014-15

Annual Report of Programs & Activities 2014-15

The Annual Report of Programs & Activities 2014-15 offers news on Delaware geology and water resources, on recent DGS publications, and on DGS staff activities as an online publication.

Recent and Historical Groundwater Level Data

Recent and Historical Groundwater Level Data. Data accessible on this page are a subset of DGS holdings. Click on the chart link to display a hydrograph or the data link to download all observations for the period of record.

B9 Stratigraphy of the Sedimentary Rocks of Delaware

B9 Stratigraphy of the Sedimentary Rocks of Delaware

The stratigraphy of the Coastal Plain of Delaware is discussed with emphasis placed upon an appraisal of the stratigraphic nomenclature. A revised stratigraphic column for Delaware is proposed. Rock stratigraphic units, based mainly on data from certain key wells, are described and the published names which have been or which might conceivably be applied to those units are reviewed. In each case a name is chosen and the reasons for the choice are stated. The relationships between the column established for Delaware and the recognized columns for adjacent states are considered. The rock units of the Coastal Plain of New Jersey, Delaware, and Maryland form an interrelated mass. However, profound facies changes do occur, particularly in the dip direction, but also along the strike. Thus, attempts to extend units established in the outcrop belt almost indefinitely into the subsurface have been unsatisfactory.

IS6 Delaware's State Boundaries

Delaware's State Boundaries

One hundred seventy-nine monuments help to mark Delaware's boundaries with Maryland, Pennsylvania, and New Jersey. Although there are only four major boundaries, there are seven boundary lines that make up the confines of the State. They are the east-west boundary, or Transpeninsular Line; the north-south boundary, or the Tangent Line, Arc, and North lines;; the Delaware-Pennsylvania boundary, including the Top of the Wedge Line and the 12-mile Circle; and the Delaware-New Jersey boundary including the 1934 Mean Low Water Line and the Delaware Bay Line. Only the Transpeninsular, Tangent, Arc, North, 12-mile Circle, and 1934 Mean Low Water lines are monumented. The Delaware Bay Line is defined by the navigational
channel. The boundaries described here evolved through long, complex histories (see references). They are based largely on adjudication in England of conflicting claims by the Penns and the Calverts for the Pennsylvania and Maryland colonies.

Investigating the Causes of Earthquakes in Delaware

Presentation on Investigating the Causes of Earthquakes in Delaware

Interactive Map of Delaware Earthquakes

Map and data listing of all earthquakes with an epicenter within the State of Delaware.

Earthquake Felt Report

Please answer every question to the best of your ability. Either fill in the blanks where called for, or check the response that best describes the event. If a question does not apply or if you don't know how to respond to a particular question, simply skip it and go on to the next. Feel free to add additional information in the Additional Comments box at the bottom of the form.

RI72 Geology and Extent of the Confined Aquifers of Kent County, Delaware

RI72 Geology and Extent of the Confined Aquifers of Kent County, Delaware

Ground water comprises nearly all of the water supply in Kent County, Delaware. The confined aquifers of the area are an important part of this resource base. The aim of this study is to provide an up-to-date geologic framework for the confined aquifers of Kent County, with a focus on their stratigraphy and correlation. Seven confined aquifers are used for water supply in Kent County. All occur at progressively greater depths south-southeastward, paralleling the overall dip of the sedimentary section that underlies the state. The two geologically oldest, the Mount Laurel and Rancocas aquifers, are normally reached by drilling only in the northern part of the county. The Mount Laurel aquifer is an Upper Cretaceous marine shelf deposit composed of clean quartz sands that are commonly glauconitic. It occurs at around 300 ft below sea level in the Smyrna Clayton area and is typically just less than 100 ft thick. Southward, toward Dover, it passes into fine-grained facies that do not yield significant ground water. The Rancocas aquifer is a Paleocene to Eocene marine unit of shelf deposits consisting of glauconite-rich sands with shells and hard layers. It occurs as high as 100 ft below sea level in northwestern Kent County and deepens southeastward, rapidly changing facies to finer-grained, nonaquifer lithologies in the same direction.

RI71 Internal Stratigraphic Correlation of the Subsurface Potomac Formation, New Castle County, Delaware, and Adjacent Areas in Maryland and New Jersey

RI71 Internal Stratigraphic Correlation of the Subsurface Potomac Formation, New Castle County, Delaware, and Adjacent Areas in Maryland and New Jersey

This report presents a new time-stratigraphic framework for the subsurface Potomac Formation of New Castle County, Delaware, part of adjacent Cecil County, Maryland, and nearby tie-in boreholes in New Jersey. The framework is based on a geophysical well-log correlation datum that approximates the contact between Upper and Lower Cretaceous sediments. This datum is constrained by age determinations based on published and unpublished results of studies of fossil pollen and spores in samples of sediment cores from boreholes in the study area. Geophysical log correlation lines established above and below the datum approximate additional chronostratigraphic surfaces. The time-stratigraphic units thus defined are not correlated parallel to the basement unconformity, as in previous practice, but instead onlap it in an updip direction. In future studies, the sedimentary facies of the Potomac Formation within each time-stratigraphic layer may be mapped and analyzed as genetically related contemporaneous units. This new stratigraphic framework will allow better delineation of the degree of lateral connection between potential aquifer sands, thus enhancing understanding of aquifer architecture.

RI69 Geology of The Old College Formation Along the Fall Zone of Delaware

RI69 Geology of The Old College Formation Along the Fall Zone of Delaware

This publication formally establishes the Old College Formation, a lithostratigraphic unit located along the Fall Zone of Delaware. It is named for sediments encountered in numerous drill holes on, and adjacent to, the Old College campus of the University of Delaware in Newark, Delaware. The Old College Formation consists of micaceous, brown to reddish-brown, fine to coarse sand with scattered gravelly sand overlain by sandy silt beds. The Old College Formation has a distinctive suite of abundant heavy minerals including sillimanite, staurolite, and magnetite. Provenance of the sand is local, derived from erosion of Piedmont rocks along and just to the west of the Fall Zone. The unit is the result of alluvial fan deposition on a pediment-like surface extending from the Fall Zone to the adjacent Coastal Plain. The Old College Formation is a surficial unit that overlies Piedmont saprolite, the Cretaceous Potomac Formation, and the Pleistocene Columbia Formation. No fossil data are available for the unit. Stratigraphic and geomorphic positions indicate that it ranges from 500,000 to 1,000,000 years old; slightly younger than the Columbia Formation.

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