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Site content related to keyword: "Bethany Beach"

DGS releases new geologic map of Bethany Beach and Fenwick Island area

The Delaware Geological Survey (DGS) has published a new geologic map of the Bethany Beach and Fenwick Island area in eastern Sussex County titled Geologic Map of the Bethany Beach and Assawoman Bay Quadrangles, Delaware.

Geologic Map 18 presents the results of research by Kelvin W. Ramsey and Jaime Tomlinson of the DGS and is the first web-only map published by the DGS.

DGS Geologic Map No. 18 (Bethany Beach and Assawoman Bay Quadrangles, Delaware) Dataset

DGS Geologic Map No. 18 (Bethany Beach and Assawoman Bay Quadrangles, Delaware) Dataset

This vector data set contains the rock unit polygons for the surficial geology in the Delaware Coastal Plain covered by DGS Geologic Map Series No. 18 (Bethany Beach and Assawoman Bay Quadrangles). The geologic history of the surficial units of the Bethany Beach and Assawoman Bay Quadrangles is that of deposition of the Beaverdam Formation and its subsequent modification by erosion and deposition related to sea-level fluctuations during the Pleistocene. The geology reflects this complex history onshore, in Indian River Bay and Assawoman Bay, and offshore in the Atlantic Ocean. Erosion during the late Pleistocene sea-level lowstand and ongoing deposition offshore and in Indian River Bay during the Holocene rise in sea level represents the latest of several cycles of erosion and deposition. An additional dataset of datapoints used to generate rock unit polygons for the surficial geology in the Delaware Coastal Plain covered by DGS Geologic Map Series No. 18 (Bethany Beach and Assawoman Bay quadrangles) exists for use in conjunction with this dataset.

GM18 Geologic Map of the Bethany Beach and Assawoman Bay Quadrangles, Delaware

Geologic Map of the Bethany Beach and Assawoman Bay Quadrangles, Delaware

The geologic history of the surficial units of the Bethany Beach and Assawoman Bay Quadrangles is that of deposition of the Beaverdam Formation and its subsequent modification by erosion and deposition related to sea-level fluctuations during the Pleistocene. The geology reflects this complex history onshore, in Indian River Bay and Assawoman Bay, and offshore in the Atlantic Ocean. Erosion during the late Pleistocene sea-level lowstand and ongoing deposition offshore and in Indian River Bay during the Holocene rise in sea level represents the latest of several cycles of erosion and deposition.

Map Scale: 
24.000

The Storm of '62

Kelvin Ramsey was quoted in the special section of Coastal Point, which featured the 50th anniversary of the Ash Wednesday 1962 nor'easter

RI75 Stratigraphy and Correlation of the Oligocene to Pleistocene Section at Bethany Beach, Delaware

RI75 Stratigraphy and Correlation of the Oligocene to Pleistocene Section at Bethany Beach, Delaware

The Bethany Beach borehole (Qj32-27) provides a nearly continuous record of the Oligocene to Pleistocene formations of eastern Sussex County, Delaware. This 1470-ft-deep, continuously cored hole penetrated Oligocene, Miocene, and Pleistocene stratigraphic units that contain important water-bearing intervals. The resulting detailed data on lithology, ages, and environments make this site an important reference section for the subsurface geology of the region.

Number of Pages: 
47

HM7 Geohydrology of the Southern Coastal Area, Delaware

Geohydrology of the Southern Coastal Area, Delaware

Geology and hydrology of the Southern Coastal Area, Delaware. There are 2 sheets in this series.

Map Scale: 
24,000

Digital Watershed and Bay Boundaries for Rehoboth Bay, Indian River Bay, and Indian River (OFR 47)

Digital Watershed and Bay Boundaries for Rehoboth Bay, Indian River Bay, and Indian River (OFR 47)

Digital watershed and bay polygons for use in geographic information systems were created for Rehoboth Bay, Indian River, and Indian River Bay in southeastern Delaware. Polygons were created using a hierarchical classification scheme and a consistent, documented methodology that enables unambiguous calculations of watershed and bay surface areas within a geographic information system. The watershed boundaries were delineated on 1:24,000-scale topographic maps. The resultant polygons represent the entire watersheds for these water bodies, with four hierarchical levels based on surface area. Bay boundaries were delineated by adding attributes to existing polygons representing water and marsh in U.S. Geological Survey Digital Line Graphs of 1:24,000-scale topographic maps and by dissolving the boundaries between polygons with similar attributes. The hierarchy of bays incorporates three different definitions of the coastline: the boundary between open water and land, a simplified version of that boundary, and the upland-lowland boundary. The polygon layers are supplied in a geodatabase format.

RI13 The Occurrence of Saline Ground Water in Delaware Aquifers

RI13 The Occurrence of Saline Ground Water in Delaware Aquifers

The location of the fresh-salt-water-boundary in the deeper aquifers of Delaware is related mainly to head values. Near coastal areas, dynamic conditions may prevail that affect the interface position within shallow aquifers open to the sea. Holocene and Columbia sands which form Delaware's shallow water-table aquifers contain brackish water in scattered coastal areas while brackish water in the artesian aquifers is found at various depths. Water from Chesapeake Group sediments (Miocene) is fresh in Kent County but is salty in poorly defined areas of Sussex County. The interface in the Piney Point Formation (Eocene) lies just north of Milford and extends in a northeast-southwesterly direction across the State. Brackish water exists in the Magothy and Potomac formations of Cretaceous age a few miles south of Middletown. Heavy pumping near sources of brackish water should be avoided for the present. Proper location of monitoring wells is necessary for detection of future chloride movement.

DGS issues report on the geology of Bethany Beach

RI75 Stratigraphy And Correlation Of The Oligocene To Pleistocene Section At Bethany Beach, Delaware

The Delaware Geological Survey (DGS) at the University of Delaware released a report that provides new insights into the underground geology and hydrology of southeastern Sussex County, Delaware. The report, "Stratigraphy and Correlation of the Oligocene to Pleistocene Section at Bethany Beach, Delaware," summarizes the results of geological investigations conducted on a 1,470-foot-deep research borehole drilled at Bethany Beach, Del.