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Site content related to keyword: "Appalachian Piedmont"

SP1 The Story of Your State Geological Survey's Search for Water

SP1 The Story of Your State Geological Survey's Search for Water

This is a brief story about water and the ways in which the Delaware Geological Survey helps insure that you will always have a plentiful supply of this precious natural resource.

Piedmont Rock Units

The Piedmont occurs in the hilly northernmost part of the state and is composed of crystalline metamorphic and igneous rocks. This chart summarizes the age and distribution of the geologic units that are recognized in the Delaware Piedmont by the Delaware Geological Survey.

What are GeoAdventures?

The Wilmington Western Railroad follows the Red Clay Valley through the Delaware Piedmont cutting through many of the Piedmont rock units.

GeoAdventures are designed to allow the reader to learn about a particular geologic point of interest in Delaware’s Piedmont province and then take a short field trip to that area. Want to know more about the Wilmington blue rock or Brandywine blue granite? Take the Wilmington Blue Rock GeoAdventure and go see just what the blue rock looks like.

Delaware State Mineral - Sillimanite

Sillimanite - Delaware State Mineral

In 1977, the Delaware General Assembly, acting on a proposal by the Delaware Mineralogical Society, established sillimanite as the Delaware State Mineral. This act recognizes the geological and mineralogical significance of the large masses of this mineral found as boulders at Brandywine Springs, an occurrence that was recognized as important in the 6th (1892) edition of Dana's System of Mineralogy. The Brandywine Springs boulders are remarkable for their size and purity. The sillimanite has a fibrous texture reminiscent of wood and could potentially be cut into cabochon gems showing a chatoyant ("cat's eye") effect. Sillimanite is not mined as an ore or raw material in Delaware.

Overview of Earthquakes in Delaware

DGS Seismic Recorder

Earthquakes occur in northern Delaware and adjacent areas of Pennsylvania, Maryland, and New Jersey. Over 550 earthquakes have been documented within 150 miles of Delaware since 1677, and 69 earthquakes have been documented or suspected in Delaware since 1871.

Overview of the Piedmont

The Piedmont is defined by hard crystalline rocks north of the fall zone.

The Appalachian Piedmont and Atlantic Coastal Plain are physiographic provinces that are separated by the fall zone. The fall zone (also called the Fall Line) is the contact where the hard crystalline rocks of the Piedmont dip under and disappear beneath the sediments of the Coastal Plain. The landscape and rock types shown in northern Delaware are classical examples of the larger geologic features that dominate the geology of eastern North America.

The Geology of Delaware

The Geology of Delaware is an online resource for information about the geology and hydrogeology of Delaware. Information on these pages is explained in general terms although common geologic terminology is used. This book covers the major important factors in Delaware geology as well as latest research. Additional information is provided at the bottom of some pages and on the last page of the book, More Information.

RI22 Hydrogeology of Selected Sites in the Greater Newark Area, Delaware

RI22 Hydrogeology of Selected Sites in the Greater Newark Area, Delaware

Additional sources of ground water have been located in the Piedmont Province as a result of a ground-water exploration program conducted by the Delaware Geological Survey at the University of Delaware in cooperation with the City of Newark. Drilling sites for relatively high-yielding wells were located through the use of geophysical investigations, air-photo interpretation, field mapping, and review of existing data.

RI19 Geology of the Fall Zone in Delaware

RI19 Geology of the Fall Zone in Delaware

The complex geologic framework of the Fall Zone in Delaware is primarily caused by diverse structural features present in the crystalline basement rocks that have exerted a considerable influence on the distribution of the overlying sediments of the Coastal Plain.

RI18 Geology and Ground Water, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware

RI18 Geology and Ground Water, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware

The results of an intensive ground-water study on University of Delaware lands in the Newark area revealed additional sources of available ground water. Geophysical techniques, air-photo interpretation, studies of existing data, field mapping, test drilling, and pump tests were used as the bases for guiding additional well development. The study, conducted by the Delaware Geological Survey, was a cooperative effort between the University of Delaware and the City of Newark in response to mutual water supply problems. A potential ground-water yield of about 500 gpm was discovered on the University Laird Tract in the Piedmont Province. Ground water available from other locations in the Coastal Plain portion of the study area may total about 175 gpm. However, careful well development and proper well spacing will be necessary to obtain optimum yields.

RI16 Application of Geophysics to Highway Design in the Piedmont of Delaware

RI16 Application of Geophysics to Highway Design in the Piedmont of Delaware

The feasibility of using geophysical techniques in determining the amount of overburden and the nature of the subsurface along a proposed highway was tested in the Piedmont area of Delaware. The area is underlain by crystalline rocks capped by varying amounts of unconsolidated material or regolith. Seismic refraction and surface resistivity methods were used at selected stations and the interpretations were later compared to results from test holes and to the material exposed in road cuts. In general, interpretation of the seismic refraction results compared quite well with test borings and with field observations made after construction was started. Resistivity data were inconclusive in themselves but provided some additional control points when correlated with seismic refraction data. With proper control, it is concluded that such techniques could be useful in the Piedmont of Delaware for highway planning.

HM3 Geohydrology of the Wilmington Area, Delaware

Geohydrology of the Wilmington Area, Delaware

Geology and hydrology of the Wilmington, Delaware area. There are 4 sheets in this series.

Map Scale: 
24,000

HM2 Geohydrology of the Newark Area, Delaware

Geohydrology of the Newark Area, Delaware

Geology and Hydrology of the Newark, Delaware area. There are 2 sheets in this series.

Map Scale: 
24,000

GM14 Geologic Map of Kent County, Delaware

GM14 Geologic Map of Kent County, Delaware

This map shows the surficial geology of Kent County, Delaware at a scale of 1:100,000. Maps at this scale are useful for viewing the general geologic framework on a county-wide basis, determining the geology of watersheds, and recognizing the relationship of geology to regional or county-wide environmental or land-use issues. This map, when combined with the subsurface geologic information, provides a basis for locating water supplies, mapping ground-water recharge areas, and protecting ground and surface water. Geologic maps are also used to identify geologic hazards, such as flood-prone areas, to identify sand and gravel resources, and to support state, county, and local land-use and planning decisions.

Map Scale: 
100,000

GM13 Geologic Map of New Castle County, Delaware

GM13 Geologic Map of New Castle County, Delaware

This map shows the surficial geology of New Castle County, Delaware at a scale of 1:100,000. Maps at this scale are useful for viewing the general geologic framework on a county-wide basis, determining the geology of watersheds, and recognizing the relationship of geology to regional or county-wide environmental or land-use issues. This map, when combined with the subsurface geologic information, provides a basis for locating water supplies, mapping ground-water recharge areas, and protecting ground and surface water. Geologic maps are also used to identify geologic hazards, such as sinkholes and flood-prone areas, to identify sand and gravel resources, and for supporting state, county, and local land-use and planning decisions.

Map Scale: 
100,000
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