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Site content related to keyword: "remote sensing"

Protecting tidal wetlands - UD scientists study tidal flow, sediment movement in Kent salt marsh

Three University of Delaware scientists are studying tidal water flow and sediment movement in a Kent County salt marsh to better understand changes to the marsh ecosystem due to a rising sea level.

DGS Participates in the Delaware Estuary Conference

Partnership for the Delaware Estuary

DGS researchers Tom McKenna and John Callahan presented some of their work at the Delaware Estuary Science and Environmental Summit at Cape May, NJ, and hosted by the Partnership for the Delaware Estuary.

IS1 Delaware Geological Survey Cartographic Information Center

IS1 Delaware Geological Survey Cartographic Information Center

The Delaware Geological Survey Cartographic Information Center has made the DGS a focal point for questions concerning the availability of all types of aerial photography, thematic maps, planimetric maps, topographic maps, historic maps, LANDSAT imagery, space imagery, side looking aerial radar imagery (SLAR), and geodetic control. Sources of maps, charts, aerial photography, boundary mark information, and vertical geodetic control can be obtained for your area of interest within the State through the Center's computer-searchable data bases. In addition, through the Center's affiliation with the U. S. Geological Survey's National Cartographic Information Center (NCIC) in Reston, Virginia, we can locate all cartographic materials covering the United States produced by federal agencies.

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Temporal Imaging of the Intertidal Critical Zone

Time series of thermal images showing increasing temperature (yellow, orange, and red) as warm tidal water flows over a saltmarsh near Bowers Beach, Delaware during a summer evening (June 2009).
Project Contact(s):

We are developing an innovative ground-based imaging system to collect multi-spectral imagery (visible, near and thermal infrared bands) at time-scales (minutes/hours) below those of the dominant processes in intertidal environments (semi-diurnal tides, day/night). A modular system based on mature imaging technology is being assembled for science missions by foot, boat, truck, tower, and lift. This project consists of some critical laboratory studies to test our conceptual framework.

UD hosts first-ever Geospatial Research Day

UD Geospatial Research Day

The University of Delaware's first Geospatial Research Day took place in the Trabant University Center on Thursday, Nov. 19. The free event highlighted the geospatial research being conducted at the University of Delaware and the ways in which UD community members are using geospatial technology.

UD plans Geospatial Research Day for November 19, 2009

UD Geospatial Research Day

This free event will showcase UD researchers in their use of geospatial techniques and technologies.

RI74 Locating Ground-Water Discharge Areas in Rehoboth and Indian River Bays and Indian River, Delaware Using Landsat 7 Imagery

RI74 Locating Ground-Water Discharge Areas in Rehoboth and Indian River Bays and Indian River, Delaware Using Landsat 7 Imagery

Delaware’s Inland Bays in southeastern Sussex County are valuable natural resources that have been experiencing environmental degradation since the late 1960s. Stresses on the water resource include land use practices, modifications of surface drainage, ground-water pumping, and wastewater disposal. One of the primary environmental problems in the Inland Bays is nutrient over-enrichment. Nitrogen and phosphorous loads are delivered to the bays by ground water, surface water, and air. Nitrogen loading from ground-water discharge is one of the most difficult to quantify; therefore, locating these discharge areas is a critical step toward mitigating this load to the bays. Landsat 7 imagery was used to identify ground-water discharge areas in Indian River and Rehoboth and Indian River bays in Sussex County, Delaware. Panchromatic, near-infrared, and thermal bands were used to identify ice patterns and temperature differences in the surface water, which are indicative of ground-water discharge. Defining a shoreline specific to each image was critical in order to eliminate areas of the bays that were not representative of open water. Atmospheric correction was not necessary due to low humidity conditions during image acquisition. Ground-water discharge locations were identified on the north shore of Rehoboth Bay (west of the Lewes and Rehoboth Canal), Herring and Guinea creeks, the north shore of Indian River, and the north shore of Indian River Bay near Oak Orchard.

Characterization of Tidal Wetland Inundation in the Murderkill River Estuary

Webbs Marsh, Murderkill River Estuary
Project Contact(s):

The project supports work by the Kent County Levy Court (Kent County) to evaluate the nutrient TMDLS for the tidal portion of the Murderkill River. The project will contribute to a more robust parameterization of river-marsh interaction in the water-quality model that is being developed for the Murderkill River by Kent County. The purpose of the project is to characterize the spatial and temporal inundation of a salt marsh in the Murderkill River Estuary and to determine the feasibility of using heat as a tracer of flow to characterize inundation of other marshes in the estuary.

OFR12 Landsat View of Delaware

OFR12 Landsat View of Delaware

In Delaware some linear features recognized on the Landsat image can be related to known faults. Others are interpreted as possible faults; the causes of some lineations are not yet known. Circular features are more difficult to interpret but they are similar to the domal structures and erosional features recognized in the Gulf Coast region, for example. These and the linear features of uncertain origin can be investigated by drilling and geophysical techniques after being localized by clues provided by the satellite images. Detection by satellite images and confirmation by other geologic techniques is an efficient and effective means of geologic investigation.

OFR30 Evaluation of Remote Sensing and Surface Geophysical Methods for Locating Underground Storage Tanks

OFR30 Evaluation of Remote Sensing and Surface Geophysical Methods for Locating Underground Storage Tanks

Delaware Code, Title 7, Chapter 74, Section 7415 states in part: "The Delaware Geological Survey shall investigate the feasibility of utilizing aerial photographs and other new advanced techniques for locating abandoned tanks." In response to this charge, the Delaware Geological Survey has completed a survey of currently available remote sensing and geophysical tools to determine which methods may be utilized to locate underground storage tanks. Limited preliminary field testing has been performed.

SP26 Historical Coastline Changes of Cape Henlopen, Delaware

SP26 Historical Coastline Changes of Cape Henlopen, Delaware

Coastlines are not static features. They are shaped by the daily effects of wind, current, and wave activity. Over time, a coastline may move landward due to relative sea-level rise or low sediment supply, or seaward due to relative sea-level fall or an overabundance of sediment. Perhaps the most striking example of shoreline movement in Delaware is at Cape Henlopen which has grown northward approximately one mile in the last 160 years. Maps and aerial photographs show these changes.

The Delaware DataMIL

The Delaware DataMIL

The Delaware DataMIL collects, maps, and serves Delaware's Spatial Data Framework, or basic map datasets, on which state agencies, local and county governments, academic GIS users, and the private sector can use for their own needs. DataMIL also provides access for Delaware topographic maps that replace the old USGS 7.5-minute topographic maps for the State.

Survey gives DataMIL web site new look, features

The Delaware DataMIL New Look

The Delaware Geological Survey's Delaware Data Mapping and Integration Laboratory (DataMIL) team has modified and improved the DataMIL Web site to ensure that the state geographic information systems (GIS) community and citizens can take full advantage of spatial data framework layers.

EPSCoR seed grants awarded to environmental researchers

Tom McKenna measuring subsurface temperature along the shoreline of Indian River in Sussex County, Delaware. Photo by Doug Miller

With a focus on environmental issues important to the state, the Delaware National Science Foundation Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (NSF EPSCoR) office has awarded five seed grants to investigators whose projects aim to solve environmental problems in Delaware.