remote sensing

Mapping the evapotranspiration (ET) in Sussex County using satellite remote sensing data

Project Contact(s)

DGS is continuing a collaboration with climate scientist Kevin Brinson (DEOS) to develop and test methods to estimate and map annual and seasonal distribution of ET for Sussex County, Delaware. Remotely sensed data from Landsat 7 ETM+ and MODIS platforms will be used to estimate regional energy balance and water flux. These estimates are calibrated by comparison to ET estimates determined by direct point measurements (Eddy Covariance and atmometer) and models driven by meteorological data such as temperature, relative humidity, wind speed, and soil moisture. The results have the potential to improve accuracy and precision of ET models and will be valuable for efforts that use water budgets for resource management, agriculture, wetland assessment, and research.

Improving geospatial knowledge - Professors launch DelawareView to improve public access to remote sensing and geospatial data

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Faculty members in the University of Delaware’s Department of Geography have launched the DelawareView (DEView) consortium to improve public access to remote sensing and geospatial data.

DEView is an affiliate member of AmericaView, a national network of remote sensing scientists and GIS scientists, funded by the U.S. Geological Survey, who support the use of Landsat and other public domain remotely sensed satellite data for research, education and technology transfer.

DGS Participates in the Delaware Estuary Conference

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DGS researchers Tom McKenna and John Callahan presented some of their work at the Delaware Estuary Science and Environmental Summit at Cape May, NJ, and hosted by the Partnership for the Delaware Estuary.

IS1 Delaware Geological Survey Cartographic Information Center

The Delaware Geological Survey Cartographic Information Center has made the DGS a focal point for questions concerning the availability of all types of aerial photography, thematic maps, planimetric maps, topographic maps, historic maps, LANDSAT imagery, space imagery, side looking aerial radar imagery (SLAR), and geodetic control. Sources of maps, charts, aerial photography, boundary mark information, and vertical geodetic control can be obtained for your area of interest within the State through the Center's computer-searchable data bases.

Temporal Imaging of the Intertidal Critical Zone

Project Contact(s)

We are developing an innovative ground-based imaging system to collect multi-spectral imagery (visible, near and thermal infrared bands) at time-scales (minutes/hours) below those of the dominant processes in intertidal environments (semi-diurnal tides, day/night). A modular system based on mature imaging technology is being assembled for science missions by foot, boat, truck, tower, and lift. This project consists of some critical laboratory studies to test our conceptual framework.

UD hosts first-ever Geospatial Research Day

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The University of Delaware's first Geospatial Research Day took place in the Trabant University Center on Thursday, Nov. 19. The free event highlighted the geospatial research being conducted at the University of Delaware and the ways in which UD community members are using geospatial technology.

RI74 Locating Ground-Water Discharge Areas in Rehoboth and Indian River Bays and Indian River, Delaware Using Landsat 7 Imagery

Delaware’s Inland Bays in southeastern Sussex County are valuable natural resources that have been experiencing environmental degradation since the late 1960s. Stresses on the water resource include land use practices, modifications of surface drainage, ground-water pumping, and wastewater disposal. One of the primary environmental problems in the Inland Bays is nutrient over-enrichment. Nitrogen and phosphorous loads are delivered to the bays by ground water, surface water, and air.

Characterization of Tidal Wetland Inundation in the Murderkill River Estuary

Project Contact(s)

The project supports work by the Kent County Levy Court (Kent County) to evaluate the nutrient TMDLS for the tidal portion of the Murderkill River. The project will contribute to a more robust parameterization of river-marsh interaction in the water-quality model that is being developed for the Murderkill River by Kent County. The purpose of the project is to characterize the spatial and temporal inundation of a salt marsh in the Murderkill River Estuary and to determine the feasibility of using heat as a tracer of flow to characterize inundation of other marshes in the estuary.