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Site content related to keyword: "GIS"

DGS releases new DGIR web application

Delaware Geologic Information Resource (DGIR) Web Application

The Delaware Geological Survey has released the Delaware Geologic Information Resource (DGIR), an online data display tool and map viewer for geologic and hydrologic information, as a "beta" site. DGIR was designed to provide the Delaware professional community with a variety of geoscience data in one application. DGS will continue to refine the both the data and functionality of the website as it is reviewed.

Delaware Geologic Information Resource (DGIR) Map Viewer

DGIR Map Viewer Screenshot
Project Contact(s):

The Delaware Geologic Information Resource (DGIR) is an online data display tool and map viewer for a variety of geologic and hydrologic information released by the Delaware Geological Survey. It was designed to deliver the most commonly available and requested geologic and hydrologic information that is appropriate for use in hydrologic studies, required by regulation and ordinance, and to support state resource management decisions.

Use of Geospatial Data in Planning for Offshore Wind Development

Geospatial Techniques for Managing Environmental Resources

Four UD faculty and staff and a graduate student wrote a chapter in the book Geospatial Techniques for Managing Environmental Resources. The chapter is titled "Use of Geospatial Data in Planning for Offshore Wind Development," and the authors are John Madsen, associate professor, Department of Geological Sciences; Alison Bates, master's degree student, School of Marine Science and Policy; John Callahan, research scientist, Delaware Geological Survey; and Jeremy Firestone, professor, School of Marine Science and Policy, all in the College of Earth, Ocean, and Environment.

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Publishing Surficial Geologic Maps of Delaware

Lillian T. Wang, GIS specialist/cartographer, Delaware Geological Survey, made a presentation titled "Publishing Surficial Geologic Maps of Delaware" at Digital Mapping Techniques 2011, College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, Va., May 24.

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IS1 Delaware Geological Survey Cartographic Information Center

IS1 Delaware Geological Survey Cartographic Information Center

The Delaware Geological Survey Cartographic Information Center has made the DGS a focal point for questions concerning the availability of all types of aerial photography, thematic maps, planimetric maps, topographic maps, historic maps, LANDSAT imagery, space imagery, side looking aerial radar imagery (SLAR), and geodetic control. Sources of maps, charts, aerial photography, boundary mark information, and vertical geodetic control can be obtained for your area of interest within the State through the Center's computer-searchable data bases. In addition, through the Center's affiliation with the U. S. Geological Survey's National Cartographic Information Center (NCIC) in Reston, Virginia, we can locate all cartographic materials covering the United States produced by federal agencies.

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DGS unveils new website

The Delaware Geological Survey has unveiled a new version of their public web site. Although many of the technologies employed are consistent with modern web standards, giving the user a familiar feel and comfort level, particular attention has been paid to information and the retrieval of it.

Web-Delivered Application for Hydrogeologic Data

Project Contact(s):

This project is designed to deliver, by web-based technologies, the most commonly available and requested geologic and hydrologic information used in hydrologic studies required by regulation and ordinance and used by state agencies to support resource-management decisions. Available information can be associated with points or areas. Information associated with points includes descriptive logs, geophysical logs, raw and interpreted groundwater levels, aquifer and geologic unit identification, and hydraulic characteristics of wells. Information associated with areas is either in the form of raster-based (grid) data or polygons. Examples of raster-based data include water-table depths and elevations, tops and thicknesses of geologic and aquifer units, and aquifer transmissivity. Examples of polygons include surficial geology and groundwater recharge potential.

The intent of developing a web-technology enabled system is to provide a more intuitive and comprehensive toolset for locating, quickly viewing, and downloading the desired information in an efficient, extensible, and familiar manner.

Presentation on national LiDAR applications and benefits

William S. Schenck, of the Delaware Geological Survey, gave a presentation at the Association of American Geographers annual meeting, Washington, D.C., April 14. The paper was titled "National LiDAR Applications and Benefits: A Perspective from the States."

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A GIS screening tool for assessing suitability of land for RIBS

Scott Andres and Edward Walther, of the Delaware Geological Survey, presented "Development and Application of a GIS Screening Tool for Assessing Suitability of Land for Rapid Infiltration Basin Systems" at the National Ground Water Association Summit, Denver, April 12-15. Andres also participated in a panel discussion co-sponsored by the U.S. Subcommittee on Groundwater, "National Groundwater Monitoring Network: Listening Session."

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DataMIL receives USGS John Wesley Powell Award

DataMIL team receives the award from USGS Director Chip Groat
Date: Sep 2004

A team of state and University of Delaware staff has been awarded the 2003 John Wesley Powell award "for noteworthy contributions to the mission and objectives of the U. S. Geological Survey." The group was honored for developing the Delaware Data Mapping and Integration Laboratory (DataMIL).

The Delaware DataMIL Gets a New Look!

The DataMIL gets a New Look!
Date: Mar 2009

The Delaware DataMIL was redesigned to take advantage of more modern web technologies as well as to answer key feature requests to the system. In particular, new additions to the DataMIL include: complete FGDC metadata for all layers, a map previewer embedded into the metadata catalog, and the ability for all datasets (vector and raster) to downloaded as raw GIS data files as well as ArcIMS and WMS map services

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UD hosts first-ever Geospatial Research Day

UD Geospatial Research Day

The University of Delaware's first Geospatial Research Day took place in the Trabant University Center on Thursday, Nov. 19. The free event highlighted the geospatial research being conducted at the University of Delaware and the ways in which UD community members are using geospatial technology.

UD plans Geospatial Research Day for November 19, 2009

UD Geospatial Research Day

This free event will showcase UD researchers in their use of geospatial techniques and technologies.

IS6 Delaware's State Boundaries

Delaware's State Boundaries

One hundred seventy-nine monuments help to mark Delaware's boundaries with Maryland, Pennsylvania, and New Jersey. Although there are only four major boundaries, there are seven boundary lines that make up the confines of the State. They are the east-west boundary, or Transpeninsular Line; the north-south boundary, or the Tangent Line, Arc, and North lines;; the Delaware-Pennsylvania boundary, including the Top of the Wedge Line and the 12-mile Circle; and the Delaware-New Jersey boundary including the 1934 Mean Low Water Line and the Delaware Bay Line. Only the Transpeninsular, Tangent, Arc, North, 12-mile Circle, and 1934 Mean Low Water lines are monumented. The Delaware Bay Line is defined by the navigational
channel. The boundaries described here evolved through long, complex histories (see references). They are based largely on adjudication in England of conflicting claims by the Penns and the Calverts for the Pennsylvania and Maryland colonies.

DGS Digital Datasets

In the same ways as our printed publications, digital data released by the DGS represent the results of original professional research and as such are used by professionals and the public.

RI74 Locating Ground-Water Discharge Areas in Rehoboth and Indian River Bays and Indian River, Delaware Using Landsat 7 Imagery

RI74 Locating Ground-Water Discharge Areas in Rehoboth and Indian River Bays and Indian River, Delaware Using Landsat 7 Imagery

Delaware’s Inland Bays in southeastern Sussex County are valuable natural resources that have been experiencing environmental degradation since the late 1960s. Stresses on the water resource include land use practices, modifications of surface drainage, ground-water pumping, and wastewater disposal. One of the primary environmental problems in the Inland Bays is nutrient over-enrichment. Nitrogen and phosphorous loads are delivered to the bays by ground water, surface water, and air. Nitrogen loading from ground-water discharge is one of the most difficult to quantify; therefore, locating these discharge areas is a critical step toward mitigating this load to the bays. Landsat 7 imagery was used to identify ground-water discharge areas in Indian River and Rehoboth and Indian River bays in Sussex County, Delaware. Panchromatic, near-infrared, and thermal bands were used to identify ice patterns and temperature differences in the surface water, which are indicative of ground-water discharge. Defining a shoreline specific to each image was critical in order to eliminate areas of the bays that were not representative of open water. Atmospheric correction was not necessary due to low humidity conditions during image acquisition. Ground-water discharge locations were identified on the north shore of Rehoboth Bay (west of the Lewes and Rehoboth Canal), Herring and Guinea creeks, the north shore of Indian River, and the north shore of Indian River Bay near Oak Orchard.

OFR47 Digital Watershed and Bay Boundaries for Rehoboth Bay, Indian River Bay, and Indian River

OFR47 Digital Watershed and Bay Boundaries for Rehoboth Bay, Indian River Bay, and Indian River

Digital watershed and bay polygons for use in geographic information systems were created for Rehoboth Bay, Indian River, and Indian River Bay in southeastern Delaware. Polygons were created using a hierarchical classification scheme and a consistent, documented methodology that enables unambiguous calculations of watershed and bay surface areas within a geographic information system. The watershed boundaries were delineated on 1:24,000-scale topographic maps. The resultant polygons represent the entire watersheds for these water bodies, with four hierarchical levels based on surface area. Bay boundaries were delineated by adding attributes to existing polygons representing water and marsh in U.S. Geological Survey Digital Line Graphs of 1:24,000-scale topographic maps and by dissolving the boundaries between polygons with similar attributes. The hierarchy of bays incorporates three different definitions of the coastline: the boundary between open water and land, a simplified version of that boundary, and the upland-lowland boundary. The polygon layers are supplied in a geodatabase format.

About the Delaware Geological Survey

The DGS Building, University of Delaware, Newark Campus

The Delaware Geological Survey (DGS) is a science-based, public-service-driven Delaware state agency at the University of Delaware (UD) that conducts geologic and hydrologic research, service, and exploration for the benefit of the citizens of the First State. The mission of the DGS is to provide objective earth science information, advice, and service to its stakeholders, the citizens, policy makers, industries, and educational institutions of Delaware.

Digital Watershed and Bay Boundaries for Rehoboth Bay, Indian River Bay, and Indian River (OFR 47)

Digital Watershed and Bay Boundaries for Rehoboth Bay, Indian River Bay, and Indian River (OFR 47)

Digital watershed and bay polygons for use in geographic information systems were created for Rehoboth Bay, Indian River, and Indian River Bay in southeastern Delaware. Polygons were created using a hierarchical classification scheme and a consistent, documented methodology that enables unambiguous calculations of watershed and bay surface areas within a geographic information system. The watershed boundaries were delineated on 1:24,000-scale topographic maps. The resultant polygons represent the entire watersheds for these water bodies, with four hierarchical levels based on surface area. Bay boundaries were delineated by adding attributes to existing polygons representing water and marsh in U.S. Geological Survey Digital Line Graphs of 1:24,000-scale topographic maps and by dissolving the boundaries between polygons with similar attributes. The hierarchy of bays incorporates three different definitions of the coastline: the boundary between open water and land, a simplified version of that boundary, and the upland-lowland boundary. The polygon layers are supplied in a geodatabase format.

Survey gives DataMIL web site new look, features

The Delaware DataMIL New Look

The Delaware Geological Survey's Delaware Data Mapping and Integration Laboratory (DataMIL) team has modified and improved the DataMIL Web site to ensure that the state geographic information systems (GIS) community and citizens can take full advantage of spatial data framework layers.