environmental monitoring

National Groundwater Awareness Week - March 6-12, 2016

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Groundwater is essential to the health and well-being of humanity and the environment. Whether you’re on a public water system or a private well, whether you are a health care official, policymaker, regulator, an environmentalist or a groundwater professional, you can get involved in protecting this vital resource.

New Instrumentation for Water Budget Evaluation

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The Delaware Environmental Observation System (DEOS) and the Delaware Geological Survey have acquired and installed new instrumentation to measure evapotranspiration (ET). The eddy covariance (EC) instrument system, purchased with support from the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control, will improve the ability to quantify ET during agricultural and water supply drought periods and improve water availability estimates for resource managers.

Regional partners to focus on sea-level rise in Delaware

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A new partnership of scientists and federal officials from Delaware to Virginia will take a regional look at sea-level rise and how best to prepare for the impacts, including shoreline loss and increased flooding from storms.

RI78 Subsurface Geology of the Area Between Wrangle Hill and Delaware City, Delaware

The geology and hydrology of the area between Wrangle Hill and Delaware City, Delaware, have been the focus of numerous studies since the 1950s because of the importance of the local groundwater supply and the potential environmental impact of industrial activity. In this report, 490 boreholes from six decades of drilling provide dense coverage, allowing detailed characterization of the subsurface geologic framework that controls groundwater occurrence and flow.

Scientists dig deep to research aquifers

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Delaware Geological Survey is installing two new research and monitoring wells for northern Kent County and southern New Castle County. The project, which will take about two years, calls for eight new wells, including Smyrna, the Woodland Beach, Middletown and Townsend areas, two sites in Blackbird State Forest, Cedar Swamp and a location near Odessa National Country Club.

Scientists study flow of groundwater into bays

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On a small, homemade barge, built from the skeleton of an old ship, a gray slurry of bay bottom sand flows out, of a pipe into a bucket. Two scientists, a well driller and two student interns drill a hole in the floor of the Indian River Bay. They'll install a very long pipe into the hole and use it to monitor groundwater - how much flows 'into the bay, how salty it is and how many nutrients it carries with it.

Delaware Groundwater Monitoring Network

The Delaware Geological Survey (DGS) currently monitors groundwater levels in a network of wells in Delaware. Long time-series of water levels in major aquifers serve as critical baseline data for resource management and analyses of aquifer response to pumping, climatic variability, drought hazards, seawater intrusion, and interaction with streams and their ecosystems.