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DGS Annual Report

DGS Annual Report of Programs and Activities.

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Site content related to keyword: "DEMA"

Workshop on Delaware high water marks

Delaware Sea Grant-funded researchers John Callahan, Kevin Brinson and Tina Callahan organized a workshop on Delaware high water marks at the Delaware National Estuarine Research Reserve (DNERR) St. Jones Reserve Training Center in Dover on June 23. The workshop included an update on current progress to catalog, display, and distribute high water mark data collected in Delaware for past flooding events from 1960-present, and discussed plans for regional coordination of pre-storm deployment of water level sensors at temporary monitoring locations for future storms. Callahan, an associate scientist with the Delaware Geological Survey, subsequently shared a similar update on the project with the Delaware State Hazard Mitigation Council at the Delaware Emergency Management Agency’s main offices in Smyrna on June 30 to help assess the impacts from past storms and better prepare for future events.

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Hurricane Sandy Q&A - Experts at UD aid state, National Weather Service during storm

4:37 p.m., Oct. 31, 2012--The Office of the State Climatologist and the Delaware Geological Survey (DGS), both based at the University of Delaware, provided the Delaware Emergency Management Agency (DEMA) and the National Weather Service with weather, coastal flooding and stream flooding information for Delaware during Hurricane Sandy.

Stream and Tide Gage Data for Hurricane Sandy

GOES Satellite Image of Hurricane Sandy (Image provided by NASA)

Hurricane Sandy was a major storm event for the tidal areas of Delaware. As a part of the mission of the Delaware Geological Survey, we have compiled preliminary data related to Delaware tide and stream levels related to the Hurricane Sandy and compared them with previous flooding records.

A flood of innovation - UD and the state work together to mitigate coastal flooding in Delaware

Two state agencies, the Delaware Emergency Management Agency (DEMA) and the Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control (DNREC), collaborated with the University of Delaware and the Delaware Geological Survey (DGS) and found an answer in the Delaware Environmental Observing System (DEOS). DEOS was created in 2003 as a real-time, regional monitoring system that provides data on weather conditions, water levels, snow depth, and various other environmental factors obtained from automated weather stations in and around the state.