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Site content related to keyword: "agriculture"

Delaware Geological Survey welcomes new director Wunsch

David R. Wunsch, Ph.D., P.G.

David R. Wunsch is the new Director and State Geologist at the Delaware Geological Survey.

Delaware Geological Survey releases new geologic map of Harbeson area

The Delaware Geological Survey (DGS) has published a new geologic map of the area east of Georgetown in Sussex County entitled Geologic Map of the Harbeson Quadrangle, Delaware. Geologic Map 17 presents the results of research by Kelvin W. Ramsey and Jaime L. Tomlinson of the DGS.

The map shows and describes the geologic units found at the land surface and in the shallow subsurface in the map area. The map includes cross sections that show stratigraphic units that lie beneath the surficial units and detailed descriptions and ages of all units presented on the map.

DGS honors retiring director, state geologist Talley

Talley is retiring after 38 years of service

John Talley joined the Delaware Geological Survey as a project geologist in 1972, became a senior scientist and hydrogeologist by 1986, and rose to director and state geologist by 2004. He’s consulted with dozens of university, state, and federal governments and groups and amassed a list of more than 50 publications and reports.

DGS releases new geologic map of Rehoboth Beach area

The Delaware Geological Survey (DGS) has published a new geologic map of the Rehoboth Beach area in eastern Sussex County entitled Geologic Map of the Fairmount and Rehoboth Beach Quadrangles, Delaware. Geologic Map 16 presents the results of research by Kelvin W. Ramsey of the DGS.

Presentation on land application of waste water

Scott Andres of the Delaware Geological Survey presented “Land application of wastewater” and participated in a panel discussion of land use effects on water resources at a forum sponsored by the Sussex County League of Women Voters in Georgetown, Del., Jan 13.
Also, Andres presented “Groundwater Resources and Ag Water Use in Delaware” at the irrigation session during Delaware Ag Week in Harrington, Del., Jan 20.

Thousands come out to celebrate the sea at Coast Day 2009

Coast Day visitor Brandon Herbert Mears at the ever popular critter touch tanks. Photo by Lisa Tossey

A 33-year tradition, Coast Day lets visitors learn more about the state's ocean and coastal resources as well as the work of CEOE researchers, Delaware Sea Grant, and their many partners.

Groundwater affected by development, scientists say

Groundwater is both the source of drinking water and the method of disposing of wastewater, said Scott Andres, hydrogeologist with the Delaware Geological Survey. There is plenty of water to be had, he said, but the challenge is protecting public and environmental health.

RI61 The Occurrence and Distribution of Several Agricultural Pesticides in Delaware’s Shallow Ground Water

RI61 The Occurrence and Distribution of Several Agricultural Pesticides in Delaware’s Shallow Ground Water

In June 1996, the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) proposed a regulation to require individual states to develop Pesticide Management Plans (PMPs) to protect their ground-water resources from pesticide contamination. The USEPA designated the predominantly agricultural pesticides atrazine, alachlor, cyanazine, metolachlor, and simazine as the first five that would require a PMP.

RI51 Herbicides in Shallow Ground Water at Two Agricultural Sites in Delaware

RI51 Herbicides in Shallow Ground Water at Two Agricultural Sites in Delaware

Several common herbicides used on corn and soybeans were detected in ground water at two agricultural sites in Delaware as part of a study of the distribution of herbicides in shallow ground water and the environmental factors affecting their occurrence.

OFR16 Geologic and Hydrologic Aspects of Landfills

OFR16 Geologic and Hydrologic Aspects of Landfills

In the United States more than 3.5 billion tons of solid waste are generated annually. Of this, more than 2 billion tons are agricultural waste, such as manure and crop waste. Almost 300 million tons are generated by commercial and industrial activities and municipalities, and another 1.1 billion tons are attributed to various mining operations (Vaughan, 1969). Increasing amounts of solid waste have had detrimental effects on environmental quality. It has become necessary to reprocess and reuse some, and to provide safe and environmentally acceptable ways of disposing of the remaining waste in properly constructed landfills. Pollution brought about by improperly constructed landfills may be very severe. For example, the contaminants generated by the waste at the old, abandoned Army Creek Landfill, New Castle County, Delaware, were so widespread that the situation received national attention. General and sincere concern expressed by many citizens of our State has prompted the Delaware Geological Survey to prepare this report. The report explains the functioning of a landfill, problems improperly constructed landfills may cause, and the geologic and hydrologic aspects that have to be considered in selecting a suitable disposal site for solid waste. The report does not contain discussions of other important factors, such as social impact, transportation, and specific health hazards, that must also be considered.