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Site content related to keyword: "wells"

The Geology of Delaware

The Geology of Delaware is an online resource for information about the geology and hydrogeology of Delaware. Information on these pages is explained in general terms although common geologic terminology is used. This book covers the major important factors in Delaware geology as well as latest research. Additional information is provided at the bottom of some pages and on the last page of the book, More Information.

RI18 Geology and Ground Water, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware

RI18 Geology and Ground Water, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware

The results of an intensive ground-water study on University of Delaware lands in the Newark area revealed additional sources of available ground water. Geophysical techniques, air-photo interpretation, studies of existing data, field mapping, test drilling, and pump tests were used as the bases for guiding additional well development. The study, conducted by the Delaware Geological Survey, was a cooperative effort between the University of Delaware and the City of Newark in response to mutual water supply problems. A potential ground-water yield of about 500 gpm was discovered on the University Laird Tract in the Piedmont Province. Ground water available from other locations in the Coastal Plain portion of the study area may total about 175 gpm. However, careful well development and proper well spacing will be necessary to obtain optimum yields.

RI9 Ground-Water Levels in Delaware January, 1962 - June, 1966

RI9 Ground-Water Levels in Delaware January, 1962 - June, 1966

This report deals with fluctuations in nine observation wells during the period 1960 - 1966. These wells are part of a state-wide ground-water monitoring network and are located in areas of little or no pumping. Eight of the wells respond to water-table conditions; the ninth well appears to reflect artesian conditions.
Although precipitation throughout Delaware was generally below average during the period covered by this report, annual average water levels declined very little in the wells reported on here. There is some evidence, however, for a lowering of water-table levels by three to four feet during the period 1960 - 1962.

RI2 High-Capacity Test Well Developed at the Air Force Base, Dover, Delaware

RI2 High-Capacity Test Well Developed at the Air Force Base, Dover, Delaware

A thick aquifer of Eocene age underlies the Dover area, Delaware at depths ranging from 250 to 400 feet below the land surface. The aquifer is about 250 feet thick beneath the Dover Air Force Base and is composed of fairly uniform medium to fine glauconitic quartz sand. The static water level in a test well at the base was 18 feet below the land surface, or 5.7 feet above sea level, on April 17, 1957. The yield of the test well was about 300 gpm (gallons per minute), and the specific capacity at the end of a 12-hour pumping period was 8.3 gpm per foot of drawdown.