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Site content related to keyword: "weather"

SP27 Water Table in the Inland Bays Watershed, Delaware

SP27 Water Table in the Inland Bays Watershed, Delaware

This poster shows three different map views of the water table as well as information about how the maps were made, how the depth to water table changes with seasons and climate, and how the water table affects use and disposal of water. The map views are of depth to the water table, water-table elevation (similar to topography), and water-table gradient (related to water flow velocity).

SP22 The Hurricane of October 21-24, 1878

SP22 The Hurricane of October 21-24, 1878

On October 21, 1878, a hurricane crossed the island of Cuba and headed east of Key West, Florida. On the evening of October 22, it made landfall north of Cape Lookout, North Carolina, as a low Category 2 hurricane with winds around 100 mph. The storm picked up speed after landfall and moved northward at a rate of greater than 40 mph and maintained tropical storm force wind speeds of greater than 60 mph with gusts much higher. On the morning of October 23, it passed up the west side of the Chesapeake Bay near the cities of Baltimore and Annapolis, Maryland, Wilmington, Delaware, and Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. By the late afternoon it had reached Albany, New York, and turned eastward and passed out to sea north of Boston, Massachusetts, on the morning of October 24.

SP2 Long-Range Plan for Water Resources Investigations in Delaware

SP2 Long-Range Plan for Water Resources Investigations in Delaware

In order to obtain sufficient data which will enable the State to develop its water resources to the fullest extent of which they are capable, a series of systematic investigations is necessary. A long-range plan describing these studies is the subject of this report. A brief discussion of water in Delaware is presented first to provide a proper background for the long-range plan. The plan itself merely outlines the overall objectives and types of investigational work that must be pursued if the State is to develop its water resources wisely.

RI23 Cretaceous and Tertiary Section, Deep Test Well, Greenwood, Delaware

RI23 Cretaceous and Tertiary Section, Deep Test Well, Greenwood, Delaware

Analyses of drillers' and geophysical logs, cuttings, and 29 core samples from well Nc13-3 near Greenwood, Sussex County, Delaware indicate that the 1500-foot section penetrated by the drill can be divided into seven rock-stratigraphic units: Matawan Formation, Monmouth Formation, unit A, Piney Point Formation, Chesapeake Group (undifferentiated), Staytonville unit, and the Columbia Formation. The rock units are identified on the basis of texture, mineralogy, color, and interpretation of electric and gamma-ray logs. The oldest rocks penetrated are Upper Cretaceous; Tertiary and Quaternary rocks were also encountered. Correlations of the units encountered in the Greenwood test well with subsurface formations in adjacent parts of the Coastal Plain are explored utilizing lithologies, ages, positions in the stratigraphic column, and geophysical characteristics as criteria. Major time boundaries (Cretaceous-Tertiary; Early-Late Paleocene; Paleocene-Eocene; and Eocene-Miocene) are established by a preliminary study of mainly planktonic foraminifera. The Miocene-Pleistocene boundary was determined on changes in lithology across the unconformable contact.

RI20 Nitrate Contamination of the Water-Table Aquifer in Delaware

RI20 Nitrate Contamination of the Water-Table Aquifer in Delaware

The increasing population of the State of Delaware is placing severe strains on the quality of ground water in the water-table aquifer by disposing of septic-tank effluent in the soil. At the same time the water resources of this aquifer are being used in greater amounts. The permeable water-table aquifer, containing reserves of 331 million gallons per day, is very vulnerable to contamination by objectionable or toxic fluids and dissolved substances placed on or in the soil.

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RI15 General Ground-Water Quality in Fresh-Water Aquifers of Delaware

RI15 General Ground-Water Quality in Fresh-Water Aquifers of Delaware

Information on ground-water quality in Delaware has become critical for three reasons: (1) increased water demand, (2) need for a better understanding of ground-water flow patterns, (3) need for a "base" against which future quality changes can be measured. Analyses of about 150 water quality samples from wells show that Delaware's fresh ground waters are suitable for most purposes. High iron content may occur, however, in wells tapping the Columbia and the Potomac formations. Overall, total dissolved solids in Delaware aquifers are relatively low except in the Cheswold and Frederica aquifers (Miocene), and possibly parts of the Piney Point Formation (Eocene).

HM12 Ground-Water Recharge Potential Sussex County, Delaware

HM12 Ground-Water Recharge Potential Sussex County, Delaware

The ground-water recharge potential map of Sussex County, Delaware, is a compilation of 1:24,000-scale maps of the water-transmitting properties of sediments in the interval between land surface and 20 ft below land surface. Water-transmitting properties are a key factor in determining the amount of water that recharges Delaware’s aquifers and the susceptibility of aquifers used as sources of water supply to contamination from near-surface pollutant sources. The mapping methodology was developed by Andres (1991) for the geologic characteristics of the Atlantic Coastal Plain portion of Delaware. Mapping and methods development started in 1990 and the final maps were completed in 2002 (Andres et al., 2002). Additional information about the map and methodology and a list of cited references are presented on the reverse side. The mapping program was funded by the Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control and the Delaware Geological Survey.

Map Scale: 
24,000

HM11 Ground-Water Recharge Potential Kent County, Delaware

Ground-Water Recharge Potential Kent County, Delaware

The ground-water recharge potential map of Kent County, Delaware, is a compilation of 1:24,000-scale maps of the water-transmitting properties of sediments in the interval between land surface and 20 ft below land surface. Water-transmitting properties are a key factor in determining the amount of water that recharges Delaware’s aquifers and the susceptibility of aquifers used as sources of water supply to contamination from near-surface pollutant sources. The mapping methodology was developed by Andres (1991) for the geologic characteristics of the Atlantic Coastal Plain portion of Delaware. Mapping and methods development started in 1990 and the final maps were completed in 2002 (Andres et al., 2002). Additional information about the map and methodology and a list of cited references are presented on the reverse side. The mapping program was funded by the Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control and the Delaware Geological Survey.

Map Scale: 
24,000

HM7 Geohydrology of the Southern Coastal Area, Delaware

Geohydrology of the Southern Coastal Area, Delaware

Geology and hydrology of the Southern Coastal Area, Delaware. There are 2 sheets in this series.

Map Scale: 
24,000

HM3 Geohydrology of the Wilmington Area, Delaware

Geohydrology of the Wilmington Area, Delaware

Geology and hydrology of the Wilmington, Delaware area. There are 4 sheets in this series.

Map Scale: 
24,000

HM2 Geohydrology of the Newark Area, Delaware

Geohydrology of the Newark Area, Delaware

Geology and Hydrology of the Newark, Delaware area. There are 2 sheets in this series.

Map Scale: 
24,000

RI9 Ground-Water Levels in Delaware January, 1962 - June, 1966

RI9 Ground-Water Levels in Delaware January, 1962 - June, 1966

This report deals with fluctuations in nine observation wells during the period 1960 - 1966. These wells are part of a state-wide ground-water monitoring network and are located in areas of little or no pumping. Eight of the wells respond to water-table conditions; the ninth well appears to reflect artesian conditions.
Although precipitation throughout Delaware was generally below average during the period covered by this report, annual average water levels declined very little in the wells reported on here. There is some evidence, however, for a lowering of water-table levels by three to four feet during the period 1960 - 1962.

RI8 Evaluation of the Water Resources of Delaware

RI8 Evaluation of the Water Resources of Delaware

At present, Delaware has an abundance of water for the foreseeable future, but is already faced with water problems in some municipalities. These can only be resolved satisfactorily through complete evaluation of the State's water resources and the establishment of a coordinated program of water management.