Share

First State Geology Newsletter Signup

First State Geology has been the newsletter of DGS for over 25 years.

Click here to signup!

Site content related to keyword: "water quality"

Project Update: NEWRnet - North East Water Resources Network

Monitoring station at Coursey Pond outlet

Infrastructure that will support the NEWRNet water quality monitoring station was installed at the main outflow of Coursey Pond on the fish ladder on April 23, 2014.

NEWRnet - North East Water Resources Network

NEWRnet study sites
Project Contact(s):

The North East Water Resources (NEWRnet) consortium of EPSCoR jurisdictions of Delaware (DE), Rhode Island (RI), and Vermont (VT) will create an advanced sensor network in watersheds for gathering high-frequency, spatially-extensive water quality and quantity data and a network of lab and field-based experiments and agent-based models to investigate how to align sensor data and their visualization with utilization by stakeholders. DGS is participating in the watershed sensing network by installing and operating a nitrogen and organic carbon sensor and stream discharge monitoring station in the Murderkill River watershed, and collaborating with the project team to interpret results.

EPSCoR Track 2 - New grant from NSF EPSCoR will establish water resources network

Geographer Dan Leathers (standing), a lead principal investigator on the Delaware-Rhode Island-Vermont EPSCoR RII Track-2 grant, works with colleagues John Callahan of the Delaware Geological Survey and Kevin Brinson of the Delaware Environmental Observing System to download data from an environmental sensor to a laptop computer for analysis.

The Delaware Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR) is a partner in a three-year, $6-million grant from the National Science Foundation through its EPSCoR Research Infrastructure Improvement Track-2 program.

The grant program supports research by consortia of EPSCoR jurisdictions. Through this award, Delaware will join with the EPSCoR programs in Rhode Island and Vermont to form the North East Water Resources Network (NEWRnet). Two million dollars of the grant will go to each of the three states involved.

Assessing Potential Impacts of a Wastewater Rapid Infiltration Basin System on Groundwater Quality: A Delaware Case Study

DGS staff member A. Scott Andres along with J. Thomas Sims of the University’s Department of Plant and Soil Science have had a paper “Assessing Potential Impacts of a Wastewater Rapid Infiltration Basin System on Groundwater Quality: A Delaware Case Study” published in the Journal of Environmental Quality. This paper is the latest technical report from a DGS-led project “Evaluation of Rapid Infiltration Basin Systems (RIBS).” Four additional reports on this project are nearing release in the DGS bulletin series. Information about this project can be found at: http://www.dgs.udel.edu/projects/evaluation-rapid-infiltration-basin-systems-ribs

Finding faults - Delaware Geological Survey discovers evidence of past earthquakes

Delaware Geological Survey scientists found slickensides in core samples indicating faults in northern Delaware.

Delaware Geological Survey (DGS) scientists have uncovered hard proof of faults in northern Delaware, indicating the occurrence of earthquakes millions of years ago.

Monitoring our water - Delaware Geological Survey improving groundwater monitoring efforts with new wells, sampling

Scott Andres examines sediment samples extracted from more than 500 feet underground for clues about the amount and quality of water available in central Delaware.

Delaware Geological Survey improving groundwater monitoring efforts with new wells, sampling. Scientists are digging for answers about the amount and quality of water available underground in central Delaware, where ongoing development will put increasing demands on water supplies in the coming decade.

The Delaware Geological Survey (DGS) is installing 7,700 feet of wells at eight sites in southern New Castle and northern Kent counties to improve groundwater-monitoring efforts, supported by a $600,000 grant from the Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control (DNREC). Groundwater is the primary source of drinking water south of the Chesapeake and Delaware Canal, and populations there are projected to continue expanding.

DNREC raises capital request - Sixfold hike includes beach, water projects

More money would go to projects that make Delaware cleaner, greener and safer under a mostly no-growth budget outlined Monday by the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control. Agency Secretary Collin P. O'Mara asked the Office of Management and Budget for about $35.2 million in general funds for the fiscal year that begins July 1, with health care costs accounting for most of the nearly $2 million increase from the current year.

OFR16 Geologic and Hydrologic Aspects of Landfills

OFR16 Geologic and Hydrologic Aspects of Landfills

In the United States more than 3.5 billion tons of solid waste are generated annually. Of this, more than 2 billion tons are agricultural waste, such as manure and crop waste. Almost 300 million tons are generated by commercial and industrial activities and municipalities, and another 1.1 billion tons are attributed to various mining operations (Vaughan, 1969). Increasing amounts of solid waste have had detrimental effects on environmental quality. It has become necessary to reprocess and reuse some, and to provide safe and environmentally acceptable ways of disposing of the remaining waste in properly constructed landfills. Pollution brought about by improperly constructed landfills may be very severe. For example, the contaminants generated by the waste at the old, abandoned Army Creek Landfill, New Castle County, Delaware, were so widespread that the situation received national attention. General and sincere concern expressed by many citizens of our State has prompted the Delaware Geological Survey to prepare this report. The report explains the functioning of a landfill, problems improperly constructed landfills may cause, and the geologic and hydrologic aspects that have to be considered in selecting a suitable disposal site for solid waste. The report does not contain discussions of other important factors, such as social impact, transportation, and specific health hazards, that must also be considered.

OFR44 Storm-Water and Base-Flow Sampling and Analysis in the Delaware Inland Bays Preliminary Report of Findings 1998-2000

OFR44 Storm-Water and Base-Flow Sampling and Analysis in the Delaware Inland Bays Preliminary Report of Findings 1998-2000

This report provides initial research results of a storm-water and base-flow sampling and analysis project conducted by the University of Delaware College of Marine Studies (CMS) and the Delaware Geological Survey (DGS). Base-flow samples were collected from six tributary watersheds of Delaware’s Inland Bays on 29 occasions from October 1998 to May 2000. Water samples were filtered in the field to separate dissolved nutrients for subsequent analysis, and a separate sample was collected and returned to the laboratory for particulate nutrient determinations. On each sampling date, temperature, conductivity, pH, and dissolved oxygen concentrations were determined at each sampling station. Stream discharge measurements at each of these sites were made by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) under a joint-funded agreement with the Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control (DNREC) and the DGS. Together, the nutrient and discharge data were used to determine the total and unit (normalized to watershed area) nutrient loading from base flow to the Inland Bays from each of these watersheds on a quarterly and annual basis. At the same six stations, storm water was collected during eight storms from May 1999 to April 2000. Storm-water loadings of nutrients from each watershed were calculated from the concentrations of nutrients in water samples collected at fixed time intervals from the beginning of the storm-water discharge period until recession to base flow. These data provide DNREC with a more complete picture of the seasonal dependence of nutrient loading to the Bays from which to establish goals for total maximum daily loads in the Inland Bays watershed.

B11 Ground-Water Resources of Southern New Castle County Delaware

B11 Ground-Water Resources of Southern New Castle County Delaware

Southern New Castle County has a land area of 190 square miles in north-central Delaware. It is predominantly a rural area with a population of about 9,000 people who are engaged chiefly in agriculture. By and large, the residents are dependent upon ground water as a source of potable water. This investigation was made to provide knowledge of the availability and quality of the ground-water supply to aid future development. The climate, surface features, and geology of the area are favorable for the occurrence of ground water. Temperatures are generally mild and precipitation is normally abundant and fairly evenly distributed throughout the year. The topography of the area is relatively flat and, hence, the streams have low gradients. The surface is underlain to a considerable depth by highly permeable unconsolidated sediments that range in age from Early Cretaceous to Recent.

DGS issues report on well water quality survey

OFR48 Results Of The Domestic Well Water-Quality Study

The Delaware Geological Survey (DGS) at the University of Delaware has released a new technical report that documents technical aspects of an intensive survey, review and analysis of existing ground-water quality data obtained from samples collected from more than 200 shallow domestic and small public wells to determine the extent to which toxic and carcinogenic compounds are present in shallow ground water.