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Site content related to keyword: "rocks"

DGS Geologic Map No. 8 (Milford-Mispillion River Quadrangles) Dataset

DGS Geologic Map No. 8 (Milford-Mispillion River Quadrangles) Dataset

The scanned raster and vector datasets contains the rock unit polygons for the surficial geology for DGS Geologic Map No. 8 (Milford-Mispillion River Quadrangles). This map is the first detailed surficial geologic map in southern Kent and northern Sussex counties.

DGS Geologic Map No. 9 (Seaford area) Dataset

DGS Geologic Map No. 9 (Seaford area) Dataset

These raster and vector datasets contains the rock unit polygons for DGS Geologic Map No. 9 (Seaford). This map shows the distribution of geologic units found at or near land surface.

RI11 An Evaluation of the Resistivity and Seismic Refraction Techniques in the Search for Pleistocene Channels in Delaware

RI11 An Evaluation of the Resistivity and Seismic Refraction Techniques in the Search for Pleistocene Channels in Delaware

Pleistocene channels along the margins of the Atlantic Coastal Plain are developed in crystalline and Triassic sediments (Bonini and Hickok, 1958), or into the Cretaceous and Tertiary coastal plain sediments (Widmer, 1965). Deposits in these channels consist of sand and gravel with amounts of silt and clay. For example, the Bear area channel is 50 to 70 feet deep and contains up to 30 feet of sand and gravel overlain by sandy clay. Because they are usually more permeable than the older deposits into which the channels are developed, Pleistocene deposits are important in ground water studies for several reasons: (1) where they are thick enough they may be used as aquifers, as in the case of the Bear channel, and (2) these beds can effectively increase the recharge into the underlying aquifers by absorbing precipitation and transmitting the water to them.

RI8 Evaluation of the Water Resources of Delaware

RI8 Evaluation of the Water Resources of Delaware

At present, Delaware has an abundance of water for the foreseeable future, but is already faced with water problems in some municipalities. These can only be resolved satisfactorily through complete evaluation of the State's water resources and the establishment of a coordinated program of water management.

DGS Publications

The core of much DGS work culminates in the release of data and findings in official DGS publications, including Open File Reports, Reports of Investigations, Geologic Maps, Hydrologic Maps, and Bulletins.