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DGS Annual Report

DGS Annual Report of Programs and Activities.

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Site content related to keyword: "hydrogeology"

IS7 The Delaware Geological Survey

IS7 The Delaware Geological Survey

IS7 is a foldout brochure that briefly discusses the background and current activities of the DGS. Specifically, the following major programs are listed: Geology, Hydrology, Cartographic Information, Geologic Hazards, Seismograph Network, Outer Continental Shelf, Mineral Resources, Well Records and Sample Library, Publications, and Joint-funded Programs.

Temporal Imaging of the Intertidal Critical Zone

Time series of thermal images showing increasing temperature (yellow, orange, and red) as warm tidal water flows over a saltmarsh near Bowers Beach, Delaware during a summer evening (June 2009).
Project Contact(s):

We are developing an innovative ground-based imaging system to collect multi-spectral imagery (visible, near and thermal infrared bands) at time-scales (minutes/hours) below those of the dominant processes in intertidal environments (semi-diurnal tides, day/night). A modular system based on mature imaging technology is being assembled for science missions by foot, boat, truck, tower, and lift. This project consists of some critical laboratory studies to test our conceptual framework.

Scientists study flow of groundwater into bays - results may help track pollution

Scientists study flow of groundwater into bays. Results may help track pollution.

On a small, homemade barge, built from the skeleton of an old ship, a gray slurry of bay bottom sand flows out of a pipe into a bucket. Two scientists, a well driller and two student interns drill a hole in the floor of the Indian River Bay. They’ll install a very long pipe into the hole and use it to monitor groundwater – how much flows into the bay, how salty it is and how many nutrients it carries with it.

Web-Delivered Application for Hydrogeologic Data

Project Contact(s):

This project is designed to deliver, by web-based technologies, the most commonly available and requested geologic and hydrologic information used in hydrologic studies required by regulation and ordinance and used by state agencies to support resource-management decisions. Available information can be associated with points or areas. Information associated with points includes descriptive logs, geophysical logs, raw and interpreted groundwater levels, aquifer and geologic unit identification, and hydraulic characteristics of wells. Information associated with areas is either in the form of raster-based (grid) data or polygons. Examples of raster-based data include water-table depths and elevations, tops and thicknesses of geologic and aquifer units, and aquifer transmissivity. Examples of polygons include surficial geology and groundwater recharge potential.

The intent of developing a web-technology enabled system is to provide a more intuitive and comprehensive toolset for locating, quickly viewing, and downloading the desired information in an efficient, extensible, and familiar manner.

Quantifying Geologic and Temporal Controls on Water and Chemical Exchange between Groundwater and Surface Water in Coastal Estuarine Systems

Conceptual models for submarine groundwater discharge
Project Contact(s):

Eutrophication is one of the most common and most severe problems facing coastal bays in
populated and agricultural areas. Unnaturally high quantities of nutrients enter fresh groundwater and surface water as a result of human activities. These nutrients contribute to the overpopulation of phytoplankton and macroalgae in coastal surface waters, which results in deterioration of water quality and animal habitat. This is a particular problem in the Delmarva region, where poultry farms, agricultural activity, and growing human populations have contributed to rapidly declining populations of blue crabs, striped bass, and many other species which live and breed in estuarine waters. The economic value of these species has, in part, prompted political action and efforts to manage nutrient inputs to groundwater and surface water, the primary pathways for nutrient loading to coastal waters. Despite significant reductions, coastal water quality has largely remained poor. A better understanding of the processes that moderate nutrient loading to coastal waters, particularly via groundwater, which is much more difficult to monitor than surface water inputs, is essential for improved management methods that will result in healthy coastal ecosystems. This project will improve understanding of where nutrients are coming from and how loading may be reduced, and may aid in identification of activities that exacerbate negative impacts.

Presentation on groundwater availability

John Talley, of the Delaware Geological Survey, made a presentation titled “Groundwater Availability, Trends in Water Use, and Potential Conflicts” at the Pickle Packers International spring meeting, Philadelphia, April 15.

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Presentation on assessing suitability of land for rapid infiltration basin systems

Scott Andres and Edward Walther, of the Delaware Geological Survey, presented "Development and Application of a GIS Screening Tool for Assessing Suitability of Land for Rapid Infiltration Basin Systems" at the National Ground Water Association Summit, Denver, April 12-15. Andres also participated in a panel discussion co-sponsored by the U.S. Subcommittee on Groundwater, "National Groundwater Monitoring Network: Listening Session."

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DGS Cooperative and Joint-Funded Programs

The DGS is, by statute, the state agency responsible for entering into agreements with its counterpart federal agencies, including the U.S. Geological Survey, the USGS Office of Minerals Information (formerly the U.S. Bureau of Mines), and the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement (formerly the U. S. Minerals Management Service), and for administering all cooperative programs of the State with these agencies. The DGS also works with many in-state and out-of-state partner agencies and organizations.

Andres presented at the Delaware Rural Water Association and Delaware Clean Water Advisory Council

A. Scott Andres, Delaware Geological Survey, presented “Agricultural Water Use in Delaware” and “Rapid Infiltration Basin Systems Research Introduction” at the Delaware Rural Water Association and Delaware Clean Water Advisory Council, Nov. 18, Milford, Del.

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Digital Water-Table Data for New Castle County, Delaware (Digial Data Product No. 05-04)

Digital Water-Table Data for New Castle County, Delaware

This digital product contains gridded estimates of water-table (wt) elevation and depth to water (dtw) under dry, normal, and wet conditions for New Castle County, Delaware excluding the Piedmont. Files containing the point data used to create the grids are also included. This work is the final component of a larger effort to provide estimates of water-table elevations and depths to water for the Coastal Plain portion of Delaware. Mapping was supported by the Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control and the Delaware Geological Survey.

These grids were produced with the same multiple linear regression (MLR) method as Andres and Martin (2005). Briefly, this method consists of: identifying dry, normal, and wet periods from long-term observation well data (Db24-01, Hb14-01); estimating a minimum water table (Sepulveda, 2002) by fitting a localized polynomial surface to elevations of surface water features (e.g., streams, swamps, and marshes); and, computing a second variable in the regression from water levels observed in wells. Separate MLR equations were determined for dry, normal, and wet periods and these equations were used in ArcMap v.9 (ESRI, 2004) to estimate grids of water-table elevations and depths to water. New Castle County was divided into a northern section and a southern section with the C&D Canal being the natural line of demarcation. A minimum water-table surface was then calculated for both the northern and southern sections of New Castle County. However, dividing the county, as well as the water-level data, into two sections did not result in sufficient regression coefficients for use in the estimation process. Therefore, the data (minimum water-table surface and water-level data) were merged together and the water-table elevation and depth to water grids for dry, normal, and wet conditions were then calculated for the county as a whole.

Digital Water-Table Data for Kent County, Delaware (Digital Data Product No. 05-03)

Digital Water-Table Data for Kent County, Delaware

This digital product contains gridded estimates of water-table (wt) elevation and depth to water (dtw) under dry, normal, and wet conditions for Kent County, Delaware. Files containing the point data used to create the grids are also included. This work is the final component of a larger effort to provide estimates of water-table elevations and depths to water for the Coastal Plain portion of Delaware. Mapping was supported by the Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control and the Delaware Geological Survey.

These grids were produced with the same multiple linear regression (MLR) method as Andres and Martin (2005). Briefly, this method consists of: identifying dry, normal, and wet periods from long-term observation well data (Hb14-01, Jd42-03, Mc51-01, Md22-01); estimating a minimum water table (Sepulveda, 2002) by fitting a localized polynomial surface to elevations of surface water features (e.g., streams, swamps, and marshes); and, computing a second variable in the regression from water levels observed in wells. A separate MLR equation was determined for dry, normal, and wet periods and these equations were used in ArcMap v.9 (ESRI, 2004) to estimate grids of water-table elevations and depths to water. Kent County was divided into three regions (south, central, north). A minimum water-table surface was calculated for each of these areas and were merged together to create a single minimum water-table surface for the entire county. This grid was filtered and smoothed to eliminate edge effects that occurred at the boundaries between each of the three regions. Water-table elevation and depth to water grids for dry, normal, and wet conditions were then calculated for the county as a whole.

Digital Water-Table Data for Sussex County, Delaware (Digital Data Product No. 05-01)

Digital Water-Table Data for Sussex County, Delaware

This digital product contains gridded estimates of water-table (wt) elevation and depth to water (dtw) under dry, normal, and wet conditions for Sussex County, Delaware. Files containing the point data used to create the grids are also included. This work is the final component of a larger effort to provide estimates of water-table elevations and depths to water for the Coastal Plain portion of Delaware. Mapping was supported by the Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control and the Delaware Geological Survey.

These grids were produced with the same multiple linear regression (MLR) method as Andres and Martin (2005). Briefly, this method consists of: identifying dry, normal, and wet periods from long-term observation well data (Nc45-01, Ng11-01, Qe44-01); estimating a minimum water table (Sepulveda, 2002) by fitting a localized polynomial surface to elevations of surface water features (e.g., streams, swamps, and marshes); and computing a second variable in the regression from water levels observed in wells. A separate MLR equation was determined for dry, normal, and wet periods, and these equations were used in ArcMap v.9 (ESRI, 2004) to estimate grids of water-table elevations and depths to water. Grids produced in this project were merged with those previously completed for eastern Sussex and smoothed to minimize edge effects.

First 1:24,000 scale Hydrologic Map Published

First 1:24,000 scale Hydrologic Map Published
Date: Apr 1972

Geohydrology of the Dover Area, Delaware
Hydrologic Map Series No. 1
By Ken D. Woodruff
1972

Nanticoke Watershed Water-Quality Database (Data Product No. 05-02)

Nanticoke River

The Nanticoke Watershed Water-Quality Database (NWWWQDB) is used to
store, manage, and retrieve water-quality data generated by the “Nanticoke River
Watershed” project. The database contains information on sampling stations, samples,
and field and laboratory analyses, queries to extract and analyze data, forms to input and
edit data, a main menu to navigate to forms and specific queries, and a few formatted
report templates. The database is in Microsoft Access 2003 format. Table, field, and table
relationship metadata are stored in the database as properties of those objects. The
software's metadata reporting options can be used to view the information.

DGS Digital Datasets

In the same ways as our printed publications, digital data released by the DGS represent the results of original professional research and as such are used by professionals and the public.

RI72 Geology and Extent of the Confined Aquifers of Kent County, Delaware

RI72 Geology and Extent of the Confined Aquifers of Kent County, Delaware

Ground water comprises nearly all of the water supply in Kent County, Delaware. The confined aquifers of the area are an important part of this resource base. The aim of this study is to provide an up-to-date geologic framework for the confined aquifers of Kent County, with a focus on their stratigraphy and correlation. Seven confined aquifers are used for water supply in Kent County. All occur at progressively greater depths south-southeastward, paralleling the overall dip of the sedimentary section that underlies the state. The two geologically oldest, the Mount Laurel and Rancocas aquifers, are normally reached by drilling only in the northern part of the county. The Mount Laurel aquifer is an Upper Cretaceous marine shelf deposit composed of clean quartz sands that are commonly glauconitic. It occurs at around 300 ft below sea level in the Smyrna Clayton area and is typically just less than 100 ft thick. Southward, toward Dover, it passes into fine-grained facies that do not yield significant ground water. The Rancocas aquifer is a Paleocene to Eocene marine unit of shelf deposits consisting of glauconite-rich sands with shells and hard layers. It occurs as high as 100 ft below sea level in northwestern Kent County and deepens southeastward, rapidly changing facies to finer-grained, nonaquifer lithologies in the same direction.

RI68 Estimation of the Water Table for the Inland Bays Watershed, Delaware

RI68 Estimation of the Water Table for the Inland Bays Watershed, Delaware

A geographic information system-based study was used to estimate the elevation of the water table in the Inland Bays watershed of Sussex County, Delaware, under dry, normal, and wet conditions. Evaluation of the results from multiple estimation methods indicates that a multiple linear regression method is the most viable tool to estimate the elevation of the regional water table for the Coastal Plain of Delaware. The variables used in the regression are elevation of a minimum water table and depth to the minimum water table from land surface. Minimum water table is computed from a local polynomial regression of elevations of surface water features. Correlation coefficients from the multiple linear regression estimation account for more than 90 percent of the variability observed in ground-water level data. The estimated water table is output as a GIS-ready grid with 30-m (98.43 ft) horizontal and 0.305-m (1 ft) vertical resolutions.