groundwater

National Groundwater Association - Protect Your Groundwater Day - September 10, 2013

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Simple ways everyone can act to protect groundwater
Everyone can and should do something to protect groundwater. Why? We all have a stake in maintaining its quality and quantity.
• For starters, 99 percent of all available freshwater comes from aquifers underground. Being a good steward of groundwater just makes sense.
• Not only that, most surface water bodies are connected to groundwater so how you impact groundwater matters.
• Furthermore, many public water systems draw all or part of their supply from groundwater, so protecting the resource protects the public water supply and impacts treatment costs.
• If you own a well to provide water for your family, farm, or business, groundwater protection is doubly important. As a well owner, you are the manager of your own water system. Protecting groundwater will help reduce risks to your water supply.

Assessing Potential Impacts of a Wastewater Rapid Infiltration Basin System on Groundwater Quality: A Delaware Case Study

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DGS staff member A. Scott Andres along with J. Thomas Sims of the University’s Department of Plant and Soil Science have had a paper “Assessing Potential Impacts of a Wastewater Rapid Infiltration Basin System on Groundwater Quality: A Delaware Case Study” published in the Journal of Environmental Quality. This paper is the latest technical report from a DGS-led project “Evaluation of Rapid Infiltration Basin Systems (RIBS).” Four additional reports on this project are nearing release in the DGS bulletin series. Information about this project can be found at: http://www.dgs.udel.edu/projects/evaluation-rapid-infiltration-basin-sy…

DGS releases report on subsurface geology of Delaware City area

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The Delaware Geological Survey (DGS) has published a report that details new findings on the subsurface geology of the Delaware City area.

Titled Subsurface Geology of the area between Wrangle Hill and Delaware City, Delaware, Report of Investigations Number 78 presents the results of cooperative research between geological consultant John W. Jengo of the firm MWH Americas and DGS researchers Peter P. McLaughlin Jr. and Kelvin W. Ramsey.

RI78 Subsurface Geology of the Area Between Wrangle Hill and Delaware City, Delaware

The geology and hydrology of the area between Wrangle Hill and Delaware City, Delaware, have been the focus of numerous studies since the 1950s because of the importance of the local groundwater supply and the potential environmental impact of industrial activity. In this report, 490 boreholes from six decades of drilling provide dense coverage, allowing detailed characterization of the subsurface geologic framework that controls groundwater occurrence and flow.

Presentation on RIBS at Fall 2012 AGU meeting

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A poster "Modeling Engineered Approaches to Enhance Denitrification under Rapid Infiltration Basins" resulting from a collaborative research project between Paul Imhoff, Maryam Akhavan (UD Civil&Environmental Engineering), A. Scott Andres (DGS), and Stefan Finsterle (Lawrence Berkley National Lab) was presented at the Fall 2012 AGU meeting in San Francisco, CA on Dec. 3.

NGWA Protect Your Groundwater Day

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September 11, 2012 is Protect Your Groundwater Day. This annual recognition is promoted by the National Ground Water Association (NGWA) to spotlight how individuals can protect and reduce health risks to an important drinking water source for rural America—groundwater.

Monitoring our water - Delaware Geological Survey improving groundwater monitoring efforts with new wells, sampling

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Delaware Geological Survey improving groundwater monitoring efforts with new wells, sampling. Scientists are digging for answers about the amount and quality of water available underground in central Delaware, where ongoing development will put increasing demands on water supplies in the coming decade.

The Delaware Geological Survey (DGS) is installing 7,700 feet of wells at eight sites in southern New Castle and northern Kent counties to improve groundwater-monitoring efforts, supported by a $600,000 grant from the Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control (DNREC). Groundwater is the primary source of drinking water south of the Chesapeake and Delaware Canal, and populations there are projected to continue expanding.

Effect of tropical storms Irene and Lee on groundwater levels in well Qb35-08

Tropical storms Irene and Lee caused a 9-1/2 foot rise of the water table in western Sussex County near Laurel. Groundwater levels and temperatures in Qb35-08 were collected with an automated pressure-temperature datalogger system. At the same time, rainfall and soil moisture data were recorded by the DEOS Laurel Airport station located approximately 5 miles from the well.