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Site content related to keyword: "groundwater"

DGS Cooperative and Joint-Funded Programs

The DGS is, by statute, the state agency responsible for entering into agreements with its counterpart federal agencies, including the U.S. Geological Survey, the USGS Office of Minerals Information (formerly the U.S. Bureau of Mines), and the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement (formerly the U. S. Minerals Management Service), and for administering all cooperative programs of the State with these agencies. The DGS also works with many in-state and out-of-state partner agencies and organizations.

Water Conditions Summary Station Map

Map displaying all observing stations monitored by DGS for current and long-term conditions as part of the Water Conditions Summary for Delaware.

Groundwater Station: DGS Well Nc13-03

DGS Well Nc13-03

Station Type: 
Groundwater
Period of Record: 
1970 to present
Frequency: 
Quarterly
Map County: 
Sussex County
Map Location: 
38.825698, -75.615997

Groundwater Station: DGS Well Jd14-01

DGS Well Jd14-01

Station Type: 
Groundwater
Period of Record: 
1972 to present
Frequency: 
Quarterly
Map County: 
Kent County
Map Location: 
39.159999, -75.532501

Groundwater Station: DGS Well Id55-01

DGS Well Id55-01

Station Type: 
Groundwater
Period of Record: 
1969 to present
Frequency: 
Quarterly
Map County: 
Kent County
Map Location: 
39.172599, -75.509902

Groundwater Station: DGS Well Ec32-07

DGS Well Ec32-07

Station Type: 
Groundwater
Period of Record: 
1966 to present
Frequency: 
Quarterly
Map County: 
New Castle County
Map Location: 
39.545398, -75.633300

Groundwater Station: DGS Well Bc43-01

DGS Well Bc43-01

Station Type: 
Groundwater
Period of Record: 
1974 to present
Frequency: 
Quarterly
Map County: 
New Castle County
Map Location: 
39.781700, -75.625099

Presentation on land application of waste water

Scott Andres of the Delaware Geological Survey presented “Land application of wastewater” and participated in a panel discussion of land use effects on water resources at a forum sponsored by the Sussex County League of Women Voters in Georgetown, Del., Jan 13.
Also, Andres presented “Groundwater Resources and Ag Water Use in Delaware” at the irrigation session during Delaware Ag Week in Harrington, Del., Jan 20.

Hydrogeologic Resources for Delaware

Brandywine Creek in Northern Delaware

Hydrogeologic data and information for Delaware. This includes the Water Conditions Report, groundwater well data, links to real-time data from DEOS and USGS, and other general information about Delaware's hydrogeology.

Groundwater Station: DGS Well Qe44-01

DGS Well Qe44-01

Station Type: 
Groundwater
Period of Record: 
1959 to Present
Frequency: 
Monthly
Map County: 
Sussex County
Map Location: 
38.527698,-75.433502

Groundwater Station: DGS Well Mc51-01a

DGS Well Mc51-01a

Station Type: 
Groundwater
Period of Record: 
1958 to Present
Frequency: 
Monthly
Map County: 
Sussex County
Map Location: 
38.845401,-75.665496

Groundwater Station: DGS Well Hb14-12

DGS Well Hb14-12

Station Type: 
Groundwater
Period of Record: 
1957 to Present
Frequency: 
Monthly
Map County: 
New Castle County
Map Location: 
39.330398,-75.685203

Groundwater Station: DGS Well Db24-18

DGS Well Db24-18

Station Type: 
Groundwater
Period of Record: 
1957 to Present
Frequency: 
Monthly
Map County: 
New Castle County
Map Location: 
39.648700, -75.697502

Integration of groundwater monitoring into Delaware's water resources programs

Scott Andres, Thomas McKenna and Changming He of the Delaware Geological Survey presented "Integration of Groundwater Monitoring into Delaware's Water Resources Programs" at the 15th annual Maryland Water Monitoring Council Conference, Dec. 3, at North Linthicum, Md.

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Andres presented at the Delaware Rural Water Association and Delaware Clean Water Advisory Council

A. Scott Andres, Delaware Geological Survey, presented “Agricultural Water Use in Delaware” and “Rapid Infiltration Basin Systems Research Introduction” at the Delaware Rural Water Association and Delaware Clean Water Advisory Council, Nov. 18, Milford, Del.

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Digital Water-Table Data for New Castle County, Delaware (Digial Data Product No. 05-04)

Digital Water-Table Data for New Castle County, Delaware

This digital product contains gridded estimates of water-table (wt) elevation and depth to water (dtw) under dry, normal, and wet conditions for New Castle County, Delaware excluding the Piedmont. Files containing the point data used to create the grids are also included. This work is the final component of a larger effort to provide estimates of water-table elevations and depths to water for the Coastal Plain portion of Delaware. Mapping was supported by the Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control and the Delaware Geological Survey.

These grids were produced with the same multiple linear regression (MLR) method as Andres and Martin (2005). Briefly, this method consists of: identifying dry, normal, and wet periods from long-term observation well data (Db24-01, Hb14-01); estimating a minimum water table (Sepulveda, 2002) by fitting a localized polynomial surface to elevations of surface water features (e.g., streams, swamps, and marshes); and, computing a second variable in the regression from water levels observed in wells. Separate MLR equations were determined for dry, normal, and wet periods and these equations were used in ArcMap v.9 (ESRI, 2004) to estimate grids of water-table elevations and depths to water. New Castle County was divided into a northern section and a southern section with the C&D Canal being the natural line of demarcation. A minimum water-table surface was then calculated for both the northern and southern sections of New Castle County. However, dividing the county, as well as the water-level data, into two sections did not result in sufficient regression coefficients for use in the estimation process. Therefore, the data (minimum water-table surface and water-level data) were merged together and the water-table elevation and depth to water grids for dry, normal, and wet conditions were then calculated for the county as a whole.

Digital Water-Table Data for Kent County, Delaware (Digital Data Product No. 05-03)

Digital Water-Table Data for Kent County, Delaware

This digital product contains gridded estimates of water-table (wt) elevation and depth to water (dtw) under dry, normal, and wet conditions for Kent County, Delaware. Files containing the point data used to create the grids are also included. This work is the final component of a larger effort to provide estimates of water-table elevations and depths to water for the Coastal Plain portion of Delaware. Mapping was supported by the Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control and the Delaware Geological Survey.

These grids were produced with the same multiple linear regression (MLR) method as Andres and Martin (2005). Briefly, this method consists of: identifying dry, normal, and wet periods from long-term observation well data (Hb14-01, Jd42-03, Mc51-01, Md22-01); estimating a minimum water table (Sepulveda, 2002) by fitting a localized polynomial surface to elevations of surface water features (e.g., streams, swamps, and marshes); and, computing a second variable in the regression from water levels observed in wells. A separate MLR equation was determined for dry, normal, and wet periods and these equations were used in ArcMap v.9 (ESRI, 2004) to estimate grids of water-table elevations and depths to water. Kent County was divided into three regions (south, central, north). A minimum water-table surface was calculated for each of these areas and were merged together to create a single minimum water-table surface for the entire county. This grid was filtered and smoothed to eliminate edge effects that occurred at the boundaries between each of the three regions. Water-table elevation and depth to water grids for dry, normal, and wet conditions were then calculated for the county as a whole.