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Site content related to keyword: "groundwater"

16th Annual National Groundwater Awareness Week - March 9-15, 2014

16th Annual National Groundwater Awareness Week - March 9-15, 2014

The 16th annual National Groundwater Awareness Week will take place March 9-15, 2014. This is a time when National Ground Water Association (NGWA) and its partners educate the public about the resource of groundwater, its importance to public health, quality of living, and the environment, and for those who rely on groundwater from a household water well—how to take care of their water well system.

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National Groundwater Association - Protect Your Groundwater Day - September 10, 2013

National Groundwater Association - Protect Your Groundwater Day - September 10, 2013

Simple ways everyone can act to protect groundwater
Everyone can and should do something to protect groundwater. Why? We all have a stake in maintaining its quality and quantity.
• For starters, 99 percent of all available freshwater comes from aquifers underground. Being a good steward of groundwater just makes sense.
• Not only that, most surface water bodies are connected to groundwater so how you impact groundwater matters.
• Furthermore, many public water systems draw all or part of their supply from groundwater, so protecting the resource protects the public water supply and impacts treatment costs.
• If you own a well to provide water for your family, farm, or business, groundwater protection is doubly important. As a well owner, you are the manager of your own water system. Protecting groundwater will help reduce risks to your water supply.

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Assessing Potential Impacts of a Wastewater Rapid Infiltration Basin System on Groundwater Quality: A Delaware Case Study

DGS staff member A. Scott Andres along with J. Thomas Sims of the University’s Department of Plant and Soil Science have had a paper “Assessing Potential Impacts of a Wastewater Rapid Infiltration Basin System on Groundwater Quality: A Delaware Case Study” published in the Journal of Environmental Quality. This paper is the latest technical report from a DGS-led project “Evaluation of Rapid Infiltration Basin Systems (RIBS).” Four additional reports on this project are nearing release in the DGS bulletin series. Information about this project can be found at: http://www.dgs.udel.edu/projects/evaluation-rapid-infiltration-basin-systems-ribs

DGS releases report on subsurface geology of Delaware City area

The Delaware Geological Survey (DGS) has published a report that details new findings on the subsurface geology of the Delaware City area.

Titled Subsurface Geology of the area between Wrangle Hill and Delaware City, Delaware, Report of Investigations Number 78 presents the results of cooperative research between geological consultant John W. Jengo of the firm MWH Americas and DGS researchers Peter P. McLaughlin Jr. and Kelvin W. Ramsey.

RI78 Subsurface Geology of the Area Between Wrangle Hill and Delaware City, Delaware

RI78 Subsurface Geology of the Area Between Wrangle Hill and Delaware City, Delaware

The geology and hydrology of the area between Wrangle Hill and Delaware City, Delaware, have been the focus of numerous studies since the 1950s because of the importance of the local groundwater supply and the potential environmental impact of industrial activity. In this report, 490 boreholes from six decades of drilling provide dense coverage, allowing detailed characterization of the subsurface geologic framework that controls groundwater occurrence and flow.

The region contains a lower section of tabular Cretaceous strata (Potomac, Merchantville, Englishtown, Marshalltown,and Mount Laurel Formations in ascending order) and a more stratigraphically complex upper section of Pleistocene-to-modern units (Columbia, Lynch Heights, and Scotts Corners Formations, latest Pleistocene and Holocene surficial sediments and estuarine deposits). The lowermost Potomac Formation is a mosaic of alluvial facies and includes fluvial channel sands that function as confined aquifer beds; however, the distribution of aquifer-quality sand within the formation is extremely heterogeneous. The Merchantville Formation serves as the most significant confining layer. The Columbia Formation is predominantly sand and functions as an unconfined aquifer over much of the study area.

To delineate the distribution and character of the subsurface formations, densely spaced structural-stratigraphic cross sections were constructed and structural contour maps were created for the top of the Potomac Formation and base of the Columbia Formation. The Cretaceous formations form a series of relatively parallel strata that dip gently (0.4 degrees) to the southeast. These formations are progressively truncated to the north by more flatly dipping Quaternary sediments, except in a narrow north-south oriented belt on the east side of the study area where the deeply incised Reybold paleochannel eroded into the Potomac Formation.

The Reybold paleochannel is one of the most significant geological features in the study area. It is a relatively narrow sandfilled trough defined by deep incision at the base of the Columbia Formation. It reaches depths of more than 110 ft below sea level with a width as narrow as 1,500 ft. It is interpreted to be the result of scour by the sudden release of powerful floodwaters from the north associated with one or more Pleistocene deglaciations. Where the Reybold paleochannel cuts through the Merchantville confining layer, a potential pathway exists for hydrological communication between Columbia and Potomac aquifer sands.

East of the paleochannel, multiple cut-and-fill units within the Pleistocene to Holocene section create a complex geologic framework. The Lynch Heights and Scotts Corners Formations were deposited along the paleo-Delaware River in the late Pleistocene and are commonly eroded into the older Pleistocene Columbia Formation. They are associated with scarps and terraces that represent several generations of sea-level-driven Pleistocene cut-and-fill. They, in turn, have been locally eroded and covered by Holocene marsh and swamp deposits. The Lynch Heights and Scotts Corners Formations include sands that are unconfined aquifers but complicated geometries and short-distance facies changes make their configuration more complex than that of the Columbia Formation.

Number of Pages: 
28

Presentation on RIBS at Fall 2012 AGU meeting

A poster "Modeling Engineered Approaches to Enhance Denitrification under Rapid Infiltration Basins" resulting from a collaborative research project between Paul Imhoff, Maryam Akhavan (UD Civil&Environmental Engineering), A. Scott Andres (DGS), and Stefan Finsterle (Lawrence Berkley National Lab) was presented at the Fall 2012 AGU meeting in San Francisco, CA on Dec. 3.

Finding faults - Delaware Geological Survey discovers evidence of past earthquakes

Delaware Geological Survey scientists found slickensides in core samples indicating faults in northern Delaware.

Delaware Geological Survey (DGS) scientists have uncovered hard proof of faults in northern Delaware, indicating the occurrence of earthquakes millions of years ago.

NGWA Protect Your Groundwater Day

NGWA Protect Your Groundwater Day

September 11, 2012 is Protect Your Groundwater Day. This annual recognition is promoted by the National Ground Water Association (NGWA) to spotlight how individuals can protect and reduce health risks to an important drinking water source for rural America—groundwater.

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Monitoring our water - Delaware Geological Survey improving groundwater monitoring efforts with new wells, sampling

Scott Andres examines sediment samples extracted from more than 500 feet underground for clues about the amount and quality of water available in central Delaware.

Delaware Geological Survey improving groundwater monitoring efforts with new wells, sampling. Scientists are digging for answers about the amount and quality of water available underground in central Delaware, where ongoing development will put increasing demands on water supplies in the coming decade.

The Delaware Geological Survey (DGS) is installing 7,700 feet of wells at eight sites in southern New Castle and northern Kent counties to improve groundwater-monitoring efforts, supported by a $600,000 grant from the Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control (DNREC). Groundwater is the primary source of drinking water south of the Chesapeake and Delaware Canal, and populations there are projected to continue expanding.

Well and Water Level Summary for Wells with 4 or More Observations

Well and Water Level Summary for Wells with 4 or More Observations - Well Cb15-04

Groundwater levels are basic information needed for evaluating water conditions and for basic and applied research. For these efforts, water levels are being measured statewide in wells completed in multiple aquifers. Some wells are measured for specific projects, such as the Coastal Aquifers Salinity Project and the Water Conditions program, while other wells are measured so that staff can maintain long-term records of groundwater levels for evaluation of trends.

Table contains summary data from wells having 4 or more water level observations.

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Data and Graphs of Water Level Summaries for Wells with 20+ Years or 100+ Observations

Example Hydrograph for DB24-18 - Water Level Summaries for Wells with 20+ Years or 100+ Observations

Ground-water levels are basic information needed for evaluating water conditions and for basic and applied research. For these efforts, water levels are being measured statewide in wells completed in multiple aquifers. Some wells are measured for specific projects, such as the Coastal Aquifers Salinity Project and the Water Conditions program, while other wells are measured so that staff can maintain long term records of ground-water levels for evaluation of trends. Table contains summary data from wells having 100 or more water level observations.

Water Level Summaries for DGS Index Wells

Locations of DGS Index Wells throughout Delaware

Groundwater levels are basic information needed for evaluating water conditions and for basic and applied research. For these efforts, water levels from various aquifers are being measured statewide. Some wells are measured for specific reasons, such as for the Coastal Aquifers Salinity Project and the Water Conditions Report, while other wells are measured so that staff can maintain long-term records of groundwater levels for evaluation of trends.

Effect of tropical storms Irene and Lee on groundwater levels in well Qb35-08 near Laurel, Delaware

Rapid, significant groundwater recharge occurred in response to tropical storms Irene and Lee.a

Effect of tropical storms Irene and Lee on groundwater levels in well Qb35-08

Plot of groundwater levels, groundwater temperature, and rainfall near Laurel, Delaware

Tropical storms Irene and Lee caused a 9-1/2 foot rise of the water table in western Sussex County near Laurel. Groundwater levels and temperatures in Qb35-08 were collected with an automated pressure-temperature datalogger system. At the same time, rainfall and soil moisture data were recorded by the DEOS Laurel Airport station located approximately 5 miles from the well.

Delaware Groundwater Monitoring Network - Planning for Sustainable Future Groundwater Supplies

Scott Andres of the Delaware Geological Survey presented "Delaware Groundwater Monitoring Network -- Planning for Sustainable Future Groundwater Supplies" to the Delaware River Basin Commission, Dec. 8, 2011, West Trenton, N.J.

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Delaware Geological Survey welcomes new director Wunsch

David R. Wunsch, Ph.D., P.G.

David R. Wunsch is the new Director and State Geologist at the Delaware Geological Survey.

David R. Wunsch appointed DGS Director

David R. Wunsch appointed DGS Director
Date: Nov 2011

After a nationwide search, David R. Wunsch has been appointed the next Director of the Delaware Geological Survey (DGS) and Delaware State Geologist, effective Nov. 1. He will succeed John H. Talley, who retired on June 30 after more than 38 years of service. Wunsch holds a doctorate in hydrogeology from the University of Kentucky, a master’s degree in geology from the University of Akron, and a bachelor’s degree in geology, with a minor in chemistry, from the State University of New York, Oneonta. In 2011, Wunsch was elected a Fellow of the Geological Society of America. He is an Honorary Member and a past President of the Association of American State Geologists (AASG) and has previously served a term as Secretary of the American Geological Institute.

Wunsch to take helm at DGS

David R. Wunsch, Ph.D.

David R. Wunsch has been appointed the next Director of the Delaware Geological Survey (DGS) and Delaware State Geologist, effective Nov. 1.

DGS honors retiring director, state geologist Talley

Talley is retiring after 38 years of service

John Talley joined the Delaware Geological Survey as a project geologist in 1972, became a senior scientist and hydrogeologist by 1986, and rose to director and state geologist by 2004. He’s consulted with dozens of university, state, and federal governments and groups and amassed a list of more than 50 publications and reports.