geology

GM17 Geologic Map of the Harbeson Quadrangle, Delaware

The complex geologic history of the surficial units of the Harbeson Quadrangle is one of deposition of the Beaverdam Formation and its subsequent modification by erosion and deposition related to sea-level fluctuations during the Pleistocene. The geology is further complicated by periglacial activity that produced dune deposits and Carolina Bays scattered throughout the map area.

Delaware Geologic Mapping Program (STATEMAP)

The Delaware Geological Survey has a continuing program to map the geology of the entire state at the detailed scale of 1:24,000. The STATEMAP component of the National Cooperative Geologic Mapping Program has contributed significantly to our surficial geologic mapping program. This work has resulted in not only new geologic mapping, but also the digital compilation of previous mapping. Products of this program include file formats that can be downloaded and printed from the web as geologic map products and imported into GIS software as georeferenced layers.

A.I.duPont Students see geology of the Delaware Piedmont

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William "Sandy" Schenck lead a field trip through the Delaware Piedmont for the A.I. duPont High School Earth Science Class. The trip made use of the Wilmington-Western Railroad and everyone rode the railroad's "Doodle Bug." Activities included up close examinations of rock and mineral features and even "Panning for Garnets" at Brandywine Springs Park.

IS7 The Delaware Geological Survey

IS7 is a foldout brochure that briefly discusses the background and current activities of the DGS. Specifically, the following major programs are listed: Geology, Hydrology, Cartographic Information, Geologic Hazards, Seismograph Network, Outer Continental Shelf, Mineral Resources, Well Records and Sample Library, Publications, and Joint-funded Programs.

SP11 Instructions for Preparation of Delaware Geological Survey Data Base Schedules

The DGS, in response to the needs for efficient storage, manipulation,retrieval, and report-generating capability, has proceeded with the conversion of the paper file data base to an integrated automated geologic, hydrologic, and mineral resource management information system. It is necessary to organize data in a systematic and standardized fashion for efficient entry into the automated system. To accomplish this, the DGS has made major revisions in the data recording and filing systems.

A Generalized Geologic Map of Delaware

The Delaware Geological Survey (DGS) has published the surficial geology of the state of Delaware at a scale of 1:100,000 for New Castle and Kent counties (Ramsey, 2005, 2007). Maps at this scale are useful for viewing general geologic framework on a county-wide basis, determining the geology of watersheds, and recognizing the relationship of geology to county-wide environmental or land-use issues. These maps, when combined with subsurface geologic information, provide a basis for locating water supplies, mapping ground-water recharge areas, and protecting ground and surface water. Geologic maps are also used to identify geologic hazards, such as flood-prone areas, to identify sand and gravel resources, and for supporting state, county, and local land-use planning decisions. Portions of Sussex County have previously been mapped at 1:24,000-scale.

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DGS releases new geologic map of Georgetown area

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The Delaware Geological Survey (DGS) has published a new geologic map of the Georgetown area in eastern Sussex County entitled Geologic Map of the Georgetown Quadrangle, Delaware. Geologic Map No. 15 presents the results of research by Kelvin W. Ramsey of the DGS.

GM15 Geologic Map of the Georgetown Quadrangle, Delaware

The geologic history of the surficial geologic units of the Georgetown Quadrangle is primarily that of deposition of the Beaverdam Formation and its subsequent modification by erosion and deposition of younger stratigraphic units. The age of the Beaverdam Formation is uncertain due to the lack of age-definitive fossils within the unit. Stratigraphic relationships in Delaware indicate that it is no older than late Miocene and no younger than early Pleistocene.