OFR 50 University of Delaware Database of Amino acid racemization data for Quaternary mollusks, North and South America coastal sites

Amino acid racemization (AAR) geochronology has been applied to Quaternary deposits of the US Atlantic and Pacific coasts for over 40 years (see reviews in Wehmiller, 1992, Wehmiller et al., 1988, Wehmiller and Miller, 2000, and Wehmiller, 2013a, 2013b). In an effort to develop a comprehensive database of results from these various studies, Pellerito (2004) created the MS-Access Database that is part of this open-file publication (see Pellerito citation in reference section). The current version of this database is a work in progress, as information is being updated regularly.

Celebrate National Fossil Day on October, 15 2014


Did you know that Wednesday, October 15 is National Fossil Day? As part of the American Geological Institute's "Earth Science Week", the National Park Service has established "National Fossil Day" to promote public awareness and stewardship of fossils, as well as to foster a greater appreciation of their scientific and educational values.

Monitoring our water - Delaware Geological Survey improving groundwater monitoring efforts with new wells, sampling


Delaware Geological Survey improving groundwater monitoring efforts with new wells, sampling. Scientists are digging for answers about the amount and quality of water available underground in central Delaware, where ongoing development will put increasing demands on water supplies in the coming decade.

The Delaware Geological Survey (DGS) is installing 7,700 feet of wells at eight sites in southern New Castle and northern Kent counties to improve groundwater-monitoring efforts, supported by a $600,000 grant from the Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control (DNREC). Groundwater is the primary source of drinking water south of the Chesapeake and Delaware Canal, and populations there are projected to continue expanding.

GM16 Geologic Map of the Fairmount and Rehoboth Beach Quadrangles, Delaware

The geologic history of the surficial units of the Fairmount and Rehoboth Beach quadrangles is that of deposition of the Beaverdam Formation and its subsequent modification by erosion and deposition related to sea-level fluctuations during the Pleistocene. The geology reflects this complex history both onshore, in Rehoboth Bay, and offshore. Erosion during the late Pleistocene sea-level low stand and ongoing deposition offshore and in Rehoboth Bay during the Holocene rise in sea level represent the last of several cycles of erosion and deposition.

Dinosaurs in Delaware?

Only fragmentary remains of dinosaurs have been found in Delaware. All of these have come from the Chesapeake and Delaware Canal, mainly from the spoil piles created by the dredging of the Canal. Various nature groups in Delaware lead trips to the Canal for collecting. Most of the fossils found are those of marine invertebrates (primarily bivalves and gastropods with some remains of sponges, ammonites, and belemnites).