Share

DGS Annual Report

DGS Annual Report of Programs and Activities.

Click here to download!

Feed aggregator

Bolivar County Disaster Recovery Center Opens for Disaster Survivors

FEMA Press Releases - Fri, 04/01/2016 - 17:29

PEARL, Miss. – A disaster recovery center is now open in Bolivar County to provide assistance to survivors of the severe storms and flooding that began March 9, 2016.

Recovery centers are run jointly by the Mississippi Emergency Management Agency and the Federal Emergency Management Agency. Representatives of state and federal agencies are set up in the center to explain the various programs designed to help survivors recover.

 

The Bolivar County center is located at:

Willard R Samuels Jr. Gymnasium

700 N. Chrisman Ave.

Language English
Categories: Federal News

MEMA, FEMA Teams Canvassing Disaster-Designated Counties to Help Survivors

FEMA Press Releases - Fri, 04/01/2016 - 17:27

PEARL, Miss. – Outreach teams from the Mississippi Emergency Management Agency and the Federal Emergency Management Agency are canvassing disaster-damaged neighborhoods around Mississippi.

The teams are working in federal disaster-designated counties to give residents an opportunity to register for disaster assistance and to quickly identify and address immediate and emerging needs. The teams can also provide application updates and referrals to additional resources for remaining needs.

Language English
Categories: Federal News

DNREC issues $85,000 penalty to Hylton’s Market, Inc. for failure to comply with underground storage tank regulations

DNREC News - Fri, 04/01/2016 - 12:39
DOVER (April 1, 2016) – DNREC Secretary David S. Small has issued a Notice of Administrative Penalty Assessment and Secretary’s Order to Sal Dellomo and Hylton’s Market, Inc., for violations of Delaware’s underground storage tank rules and regulations.

Hearns Pond dam and boat ramp will close in May for up to a year while replacement structures are built

DNREC News - Fri, 04/01/2016 - 10:54
SEAFORD (April 1, 2016) – Hearns Pond dam and boat ramp, north of Seaford, will close in May for up to one year while a replacement ramp and dam are built, DNREC’s Division of Fish & Wildlife, which operates and maintains the state-owned facility, announced today.

Disaster Recovery Centers Open in Columbia, Caldwell Parish; Homer, Claiborne Parish; and Leesville, Vernon Parish, for Louisiana Survivors

FEMA Press Releases - Thu, 03/31/2016 - 17:33

BATON ROUGE, La. – Disaster recovery centers will open Friday, April 1, in Columbia, Caldwell Parish; Homer, Claiborne Parish; and Leesville, Vernon Parish, to help Louisiana flood survivors. The centers are open 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Saturday and noon to 5 p.m. Sundays until further notice.

The disaster recovery centers are located at the following addresses:

Caldwell Parish Community Center
105 Henderson St. (Corner of Henderson and Community Center Street)
Columbia, La.

Language English
Categories: Federal News

11 Mississippi Counties Added to Federal Disaster Declaration for March Floods

FEMA Press Releases - Thu, 03/31/2016 - 16:45

PEARL, Miss. – At the request of Governor Phil Bryant, the Federal Emergency Management Agency has amended a recent disaster declaration for severe storms and flooding that began March 9, 2016. Survivors in Clarke, Forrest, Greene, Jones, Marion, Panola, Perry, Quitman, Sunflower, Tunica and Wayne counties can now register with FEMA for disaster assistance through the Individual Assistance program.

Language English
Categories: Federal News

FEMA/State Joint Information Center Transition-Spanish

FEMA Press Releases - Thu, 03/31/2016 - 14:36

Noticias de la recuperación

El 5 de abril es la fecha límite para inscribirse para recibir asistencia por las tormentas de diciembre y enero

Language English
Categories: Federal News

Texas Storm Survivors May Receive A Phone Call From SBA

FEMA Press Releases - Thu, 03/31/2016 - 14:05

AUSTIN, Texas – Eligible individuals and business owners in Erath, Gregg, Harrison, Hood, Jasper, Marion, Newton, Orange and Parker counties who register for disaster assistance from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) may receive an automated phone call from the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA). SBA’s recorded message gives instructions on how to request an application for a low-interest disaster loan.

Language English
Categories: Federal News

Bat with white-nose syndrome confirmed in Washington state

USGS Newsroom - Thu, 03/31/2016 - 14:00
Summary: Wing damage from fungus in little brown bat. These little brown bats in a NY cave exhibit the fuzzy white muzzles associated with the fungus that causes white-nose syndrome. The USGS National Wildlife Health Center conducts a bat autopsy as part of its efforts to study the fungus that causes white-nose syndrome in bats. A healthy, banded little brown bat hangs out in a cave. Photographer - Paul Cryan, USGS OLYMPIA, Wash. – White-nose syndrome (WNS) has been confirmed in a little brown bat (Myotis lucifugus) found near North Bend – the first recorded occurrence of this devastating bat disease in western North America. The presence of this disease was verified by the U.S. Geological Survey’s National Wildlife Health Center.

Contact Information:

Katherine  Haman, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife ( Phone: 360-870-2135 ); Catherine  Hibbard, United States Fish and Wildlife Service ( Phone: 413-531-4276 ); Marisa Lubeck, USGS ( Phone: 303-526-6694 );



Wing damage from fungus in little brown bat. These little brown bats in a NY cave exhibit the fuzzy white muzzles associated with the fungus that causes white-nose syndrome.
The USGS National Wildlife Health Center conducts a bat autopsy as part of its efforts to study the fungus that causes white-nose syndrome in bats. A healthy, banded little brown bat hangs out in a cave. Photographer - Paul Cryan, USGS

OLYMPIA, Wash. – White-nose syndrome (WNS) has been confirmed in a little brown bat (Myotis lucifugus) found near North Bend – the first recorded occurrence of this devastating bat disease in western North America. The presence of this disease was verified by the U.S. Geological Survey’s National Wildlife Health Center.

WNS has spread quickly among bats in other affected areas, killing more than six million beneficial insect-eating bats in North America since it was first documented nearly a decade ago.

WNS is not known to pose a threat to humans, pets, livestock or other wildlife.

On March 11, hikers found the sick bat about 30 miles east of Seattle near North Bend, and took it to Progressive Animal Welfare Society (PAWS) for care. The bat died two days later, and had visible symptoms of a skin infection common in bats with WNS.

PAWS then submitted the bat for testing to the USGS National Wildlife Health Center, which confirmed through fungal culture, molecular and pathology analyses that it had WNS.

“We are extremely concerned about the confirmation of WNS in Washington state, about 1,300 miles from the previous westernmost detection of the fungus that causes the disease,” said U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Director Dan Ashe. “Bats are a crucial part of our ecology and provide essential pest control for our farmers, foresters and city residents, so it is important that we stay focused on stopping the spread of this fungus. People can help by following decontamination guidance to reduce the risk of accidentally transporting the fungus.”

First seen in North America in the winter of 2006/2007 in eastern New York, WNS has now spread to 28 states and five Canadian provinces. USGS microbiologist David Blehert first identified the unknown fungus, Pseudogymnoascus destructans, which causes the disease. WNS is named for the fuzzy white fungal growth that is sometimes observed on the muzzles of infected bats. The fungus invades hibernating bats’ skin and causes damage, especially to delicate wing tissue, and physiologic imbalances that can lead to disturbed hibernation, depleted fat reserves, dehydration and death.

“This finding in a far-western location is unfortunately indicative of the challenges we face with the unpredictability of WNS,” said Suzette Kimball, director of the USGS. "This underscores the critical importance of our work to develop tools for early detection and rapid response to potentially devastating wildlife diseases." 

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service leads the national WNS response effort, working with state and federal partners to respond to the disease. The Service’s National White-nose Syndrome Coordinator Jeremy Coleman said the first step will be to conduct surveillance near where the bat was found to determine the extent of WNS in the area. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) is responsible for bat management and conservation in Washington and will coordinate surveillance and response efforts.

WDFW veterinarian Katie Haman said the disease is transmitted primarily from bat to bat, although people can carry fungal spores on their clothing, shoes or caving gear.

“The bat found near North Bend most likely had been roused from hibernation and was attempting to feed at a time of very low insect availability,” Haman said. “At this point we don’t know where the infected bat may have spent the winter, but it seems likely that it was somewhere in the central Cascades.”

Haman said Washington state has 15 species of bats that benefit humans by consuming large quantities of insects that can impact forest health and commercial crops.

WDFW advises against handling animals that appear sick or are found dead. If you find dead bats or notice bats exhibiting unusual behavior such as flying outside during the day or during freezing weather, please report your observation online at http://wdfw.wa.gov/conservation/health/wns or contact the WDFW Wildlife Health Hotline at (800) 606-8768.

To learn more about WNS and access the most updated decontamination protocols and cave access advisories, visit www.whitenosesyndrome.org

Crude Oil Byproducts in Groundwater Plumes

USGS Newsroom Technical - Thu, 03/31/2016 - 13:50
Summary: A new study suggests that the degraded breakdown products of oil-spill contaminants in groundwater could be just as important to monitor as the original contamination itself.

Contact Information:

Leslie  Gordon ( Phone: 650-329-4006 );



A new study suggests that the degraded breakdown products of oil-spill contaminants in groundwater could be just as important to monitor as the original contamination itself.

At sites where crude oil or petroleum hydrocarbon fuel spills have occurred and contaminants have entered groundwater, naturally occurring microbes in the soil can digest or break down the original crude oil, producing byproducts known as metabolites. The metabolites are more soluble in groundwater than the parent compounds and are transported from the original source forming a groundwater plume.

Results of a recent U.S. Geological Survey study suggest that at oil-spill sites where residual sources are present, the monitoring of metabolites or breakdown products may be an important part of an effective evaluation of the fate and effects of groundwater contaminant plumes.

The study of two crude-oil spill sites in Minnesota focused on the occurrence and fate of the combination of all dissolved organic carbon metabolites in existing contaminant plumes. Contaminants such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylene and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons are commonly found in groundwater plumes from crude oil. It was the metabolites of those contaminants as well as the less soluble components of the crude oil – the biodegradation products of the original oil contaminants – that were studied.

Scientists discovered concentrations of oil breakdown products at greater concentrations than the typical regulated-compound concentrations. These types of crude-oil metabolites in groundwater plumes at the two sites are not covered by regulatory monitoring and reporting requirements in Minnesota and other states. Yet at study sites where the spilled oil is still present, the total concentration of metabolites can exceed the concentrations of regulated compounds by one to two orders of magnitude. In addition to possible concerns about toxicity, these plumes of metabolites can slow the biodegradation of other compounds in the contaminant plume.

“We compiled 20 years of monitoring data to understand the occurrence of the metabolites relative to other regulated crude-oil contaminants,” said USGS hydrologist and lead author of the study, Barbara Bekins. “Concentrations of the regulated crude oil compounds are one-third to one-half of the total concentration of the metabolites found in groundwater at our study sites. The values of the metabolites are 10 times higher than benzene and two to three times higher than the standard regulatory measure of diesel-like compounds in the same wells. Monitoring data show that the plume of metabolites is expanding more rapidly than the benzene plume.”

“Metabolites of hydrocarbon degradation, such as those found at these crude oil spill sites, are also common at sites contaminated by other fuels such as gasoline leaks and spills,” said USGS co-author Isabelle Cozzarelli.

“This analysis was possible because of USGS scientists’ long-term monitoring of hydrocarbon degradation progression. Long-term collection of hydrologic and geochemical measurements is the foundation of USGS science. This study is a great example of the application of science to inform potential regulatory process updates,” said USGS groundwater specialist and co-author Melinda Erickson.

This new research, “Crude oil metabolites in groundwater at two spill sites,” published in the journal “Groundwater,” is available online.

Help Remains for Louisiana Disaster Survivors after Disaster Recovery Center Closes in Covington, St. Tammany Parish

FEMA Press Releases - Wed, 03/30/2016 - 18:24

BATON ROUGE, La. – The Covington disaster recovery center will close Thursday, March 31, at 6 p.m.

The center is located at the following address:

Parish Recreation District
13505 Highway 1085
Covington, La.

Louisiana disaster survivors in Covington may still visit other centers for face-to-face help. They may find other locations online at fema.gov/disaster-recovery-centers or by calling 800-621-3362.

Language English
Categories: Federal News

Disaster Recovery Centers Open in Natchitoches, Natchitoches Parish, and Oak Grove, West Carroll Parish, for Louisiana Survivors

FEMA Press Releases - Wed, 03/30/2016 - 18:08

BATON ROUGE, La. – Disaster recovery centers will open Thursday, March 31, in Natchitoches, Natchitoches Parish, and Oak Grove, West Carroll Parish, to help Louisiana flood survivors. The centers are open 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Saturday and noon to 5 p.m. Sundays until further notice.

The disaster recovery centers are located at the following addresses:

Sheriff’s Office of Community Services
726 3rd Street
Natchitoches, La.

Language English
Categories: Federal News

Disaster Recovery Center Opens for Flood Survivors in Washington County

FEMA Press Releases - Wed, 03/30/2016 - 16:55

PEARL, Miss. – A Washington County disaster recovery center is now open to provide assistance to survivors of the flooding that began March 9, 2016.

Recovery centers are run jointly by the Mississippi Emergency Management Agency and the Federal Emergency Management Agency; representatives of state and federal agencies are set up in the center to explain the various programs designed to help survivors recover.

 

The Washington County center is located at:

Washington County Convention Center 

1040 South Raceway Road

Greenville, MS 38701

Language English
Categories: Federal News

MEMA and FEMA Teams Canvassing Flood-Stricken Areas in Mississippi

FEMA Press Releases - Wed, 03/30/2016 - 16:25

PEARL, Miss. – Disaster survivor assistance teams are working in flood-stricken neighborhoods throughout Bolivar, Coahoma and Washington counties to help Mississippi flood survivors register for assistance.

Language English
Categories: Federal News

Disaster Recovery Center Opens for Flood Survivors in Coahoma County

FEMA Press Releases - Wed, 03/30/2016 - 16:24

PEARL, Miss. – A disaster recovery center is open in Coahoma County to provide assistance to survivors of the flooding that began March 9, 2016. Plans are to also open centers in Bolivar and Washington counties later this week.

Recovery centers are run jointly by the Mississippi Emergency Management Agency and the Federal Emergency Management Agency; representatives of state and federal agencies are set up in the center to explain the various programs designed to help survivors recover.

 

The Coahoma center is located at: 

Clarksdale Civic Center

Language English
Categories: Federal News

DNREC and US Fish and Wildlife Service continue investigation into the deaths of five bald eagles in Sussex County

DNREC News - Wed, 03/30/2016 - 15:25
DAGSBORO (March 29, 2016) – While U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service agents and DNREC Fish & Wildlife Natural Resources Police officers continue an investigation into the March 19-20 deaths of five bald eagles in Sussex County, two eagles captured that weekend disoriented and possibly near death have been released back into the wild after rehabilitation by Tri-State Bird Rescue & Research of Newark, DNREC and the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service announced today.

USGS Seeks National Ground-Water Monitoring Network Proposals 2016 Round II

USGS Newsroom Technical - Wed, 03/30/2016 - 15:01
Summary: The U.S. Geological Survey will award up to $4 million in cooperative agreements to support participation in the National Ground-Water Monitoring Network (NGWMN). 

Contact Information:

Daryll Pope ( Phone: 609-771-3933 ); Jon Campbell ( Phone: 703-648-4180 );



The U.S. Geological Survey will award up to $4 million in cooperative agreements to support participation in the National Ground-Water Monitoring Network (NGWMN). 

The USGS is working with the Federal Advisory Committee on Water Information’s (ACWI) Subcommittee on Ground Water (SOGW) to develop and administer the NGWMN.  The NGWMN is designed as a cooperative groundwater data collection, management, and reporting system that will be based on data from selected wells in existing Federal, State, Tribal, and local groundwater monitoring networks. The Network is envisioned as a long-term collaborative partnership among Federal and non-Federal data providers that will help address present and future groundwater management questions facing the nation.

Cooperative agreements will provide support for both new and existing data providers in the NGWMN. The USGS will fund new data providers to select and classify sites within existing monitoring programs, to set up web services that will link the data to the NGWMN Portal, and to produce a report describing this process. Existing data providers will receive funds to maintain web services and keep site information current. Data providers may also receive funding to collect data to improve site information, to maintain wells, and to drill new or replacement Network wells. Information about the cooperative agreements is available on the NGWMN Cooperative Agreements page.

Interested agencies may apply online at GRANTS.GOV under funding opportunity number G16AS00043. Applications will be accepted from March 30, 2016 through May 31, 2016. 

Two Webinars are scheduled to review the application package and answer any question about the opportunity. These are scheduled for April 13th at 1 pm EDT and May 3rd at 2 pm EDT. Registration for the webinars is required. After your registration is accepted, you will receive meeting information. You may register for the webinars at:

April 13th

https://usgs.webex.com/usgs/j.php?RGID=rab7917828b342cb451207fd2882f537f 

May 3rd

https://usgs.webex.com/usgs/j.php?RGID=ref1581be2ef44f102d46946e0b0dc5d0 

Special Review and Webinar Showcase Critical Minerals Research at USGS

USGS Newsroom Technical - Wed, 03/30/2016 - 09:00
Summary: Scientists studying rare earth and critical elements now have a solid foundation for future research, as detailed in a special volume of the Society of Economic Geologists. This review volume, featuring several papers authored and co-authored by the U.S. Geological Survey, provides a comprehensive review of the current state of knowledge for rare earth and critical elements in ore deposits.

Contact Information:

Alex Demas ( Phone: 703-648-4421 );



Scientists studying rare earth and critical elements now have a solid foundation for future research, as detailed in a special volume of the Society of Economic Geologists. This review volume, featuring several papers authored and co-authored by the U.S. Geological Survey, provides a comprehensive review of the current state of knowledge for rare earth and critical elements in ore deposits.

In addition, on March 30th at 1:00 PM EDT, American Geosciences Institute (AGI) will co-host a webinar titled Underpinning Innovation: The Science and Supply of America's Critical Minerals and Materials. USGS speakers include Larry Meinert, the program coordinator of the USGS Mineral Resources Program and Steve Fortier, the director of the USGS National Minerals Information Center. In addition, Rod Eggert, the deputy director of the Critical Minerals Institute, Ames Laboratory will be a featured speaker.

This webinar is based on a March 3rd Congressional briefing organized by AGI on behalf of the Mineral Science & Information Coalition. The webinar will address the efforts being taken at the federal level to ensure a steady supply of critical minerals and materials.

The special volume, entitled "Rare Earth and Critical Element in Ore Deposits," represents an important contribution to our understanding of where, how, and why individual critical elements occur and should be of use to both geoscientists and public policy analysts. While the papers in this volume provide an overview of the state of knowledge concerning the economic geology of rare earth and critical elements, they also demonstrate the lack adequate data on the occurrence of these elements in many deposit types.

Critical minerals and materials are key components of the innovation economy. Minerals are a part of almost every product we use on a daily basis, either as the raw materials for manufacturing processes or as the end products themselves. Advanced technologies for communications, clean energy, medical devices, and national security rely on raw materials from mines throughout the world.

The concept of element criticality is useful for evaluation of the fragility of commodity markets. This fragility is commonly due to a potential risk of supply disruption, which may be difficult to quantify because it can be affected by political, economic, geologic, geographic, and environmental variables. For instance, in 2010, China curtailed exports of rare earth metals and sparked major concern about the security of global supply chains for a range of vital minerals and materials.

Critical elements may be recovered either as primary commodities or as by-products from mining of other commodities. For example, nearly 90 percent of world production of niobium (Nb) is from the Araxá niobium mine (Brazil), whereas gallium (Ga) is recovered primarily as a by-product commodity of bauxite mining or as a by-product of zinc processing from a number of sources worldwide. Critical elements that are solely produced as by-product commodities pose a particular supply risk because their production is tied to other markets and thus fluctuations in their supply can be independent from their demand.

Rare earth elements are a focus of this volume because price spikes of these commodities over the past several years have created broad interest. As demonstrated in the papers in this volume, ore-grade enrichment of REEs can occur in a variety of deposit types.