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President Declares Disaster for Texas

FEMA Press Releases - Fri, 12/20/2013 - 14:46

WASHINGTON, D.C. – The U.S. Department of Homeland Security's Federal Emergency Management Agency announced that federal disaster aid has been made available to the State of Texas to supplement state and local recovery efforts in the area affected by severe storms and flooding during the period of October 30-31, 2013.

Language English
Categories: Federal News

Delaware residents alerted to report door-to-door visitors claiming to represent DNREC energy staff

DNREC News - Fri, 12/20/2013 - 14:45
DOVER (Dec. 20, 2013) – DNREC’s Division of Energy and Climate has learned of at least three recent reports handled by Delaware State Police and New Castle County Police of a person or persons knocking on doors in New Castle and Sussex counties, claiming to represent the Division and asking questions about residents’ energy bills and electric consumption.

Now available DNREC Division of Fish and Wildlifes 2014 calendar, featuring images from Hunting and Fishing Photo Contests

DNREC News - Fri, 12/20/2013 - 14:15
DOVER (Dec. 20, 2013) – DNREC’s Division of Fish and Wildlife is pleased to announce publication of its inaugural calendar, with each month for 2014 featuring images of young hunters and anglers taken by Delaware photographers. Calendar photos were chosen from DNREC’s 2011 and 2012 Delaware Hunting and Fishing Photo Contests. The calendar also includes monthly “Did You Know?” facts, seasonally relevant reminders on Delaware’s great outdoors and a Division of Fish and Wildlife contact directory.

Colorado Flooding – 100 Days Later

FEMA Press Releases - Fri, 12/20/2013 - 12:14

(Editor: Cuts of disaster response and recovery are available at www.flickr.com/photos/coemergency or www.go.usa.gov/DeK9.)

DENVER – In the 100 days following the catastrophic floods that hit much of Colorado, more than $204 million has gone to individuals and households in recovery assistance, flood insurance payments and low-interest disaster loans.

Language English
Categories: Federal News

DNREC Fish & Wildlife Enforcement Blotter Dec 10 to 17

DNREC News - Fri, 12/20/2013 - 10:10
DOVER (Dec. 20, 2013) – To achieve public compliance through education and enforcement actions that help conserve Delaware’s fish and wildlife resources and ensure safe boating and public safety, DNREC Natural Resources Police, Division of Fish and Wildlife Enforcement Agents between Dec. 10-17 made 640 contacts with anglers, hunters, boaters and the general public, including 42 vessel boardings for boating safety/fishing regulation compliance checks. Agents responded to 29 complaints, issued 16 citations.

FEMA Pitches In To Collect Toys For Vermont Children

FEMA Press Releases - Thu, 12/19/2013 - 12:46

WILLISTON, Vt. – As the Federal Emergency Management Agency wraps up its mission in Vermont, its personnel are trying to leave behind some holiday cheer for the state’s less fortunate children.

As part of the U. S. Marine Corps Reserve Toys for Tots Program, staffers at FEMA’s Joint Field Office in Williston have collected new toys to be distributed on Christmas to area children.

Language English
Categories: Federal News

Rantoul Recovery Center to Close Saturday: Holiday Hours for Brookport and East Peoria Centers

FEMA Press Releases - Wed, 12/18/2013 - 14:43

Springfield, Ill. — The Federal Emergency Management Agency has announced the Rantoul Disaster Recovery Center at the Rantoul Recreation Building at 100 E. Flessner Ave. will close effective Saturday, Dec. 21 at 8 p.m.

After that date, survivors of the Nov. 17 Illinois tornadoes can still get information by calling the FEMA helpline at 800-621-FEMA (3362).

Language English
Categories: Federal News

A Modern Compass Improves Oil Production

USGS Newsroom - Wed, 12/18/2013 - 13:34

Contact Information:

Jessica Robertson ( Phone: 703-648-6624 ); Carol A. Finn ( Phone: 303-273-8475 ); Jeffrey J. Love ( Phone: 303-273-8540 );



By using the Earth's magnetic field, combined with new innovative technology, oil and gas drilling companies are increasing oilfield productivity while reducing development costs and environmental impacts.

An article in the fall 2013 issue of Oilfield Review highlights this technology and its applications across the world. It also discusses the public-private collaboration between the U.S. Geological Survey and partners to successfully implement the technology.

These days, multiple reservoirs of oil and gas can be accessed from a single platform by drilling vertically and then horizontally. Drill operators need to know which way their drill bits are going to maximize oil production and avoid collisions with other wells. One way to accomplish this important task is to install a magnetometer—a sort of modern-day "compass"—in a drill-string instrument package that follows the drill bit.

The USGS plays a unique role by monitoring the geomagnetic field every single second at magnetic observatories throughout the country. Through a process called geomagnetic referencing, simultaneous measurements of the magnetic field in the drill hole are combined with those from magnetic observatories at the Earth’s surface to produce a highly accurate estimate of the drill bit position and direction.

The Earth's magnetic field changes all the time across the world as a result of factors like periodic daily tides or rapid magnetic storms that are related to the 11-year sunspot solar cycle. And at high latitudes, such as in northern Alaska or the North Sea, the geomagnetic field can be very active and can change dramatically during magnetic storms.

"Drill-bit positioning requires directional accuracy of a fraction of a degree, and this can be accomplished with advanced technology and expert understanding of the Earth's dynamic magnetic field," said Carol A. Finn, USGS Geomagnetism Group Leader. "USGS operational systems measure the magnetic field on a continuous basis. These data are provided as a service to research scientists, civilian and defense government agencies, and to customers in the private sector, including the oil and gas drilling industry."

The USGS Geomagnetism Program monitors variations in the Earth's magnetic field through a network of 14 ground-based observatories around the United States and its territories. There are many customers for geomagnetism data, since the variable conditions of space weather can interfere with radio communication, GPS systems, electric power grids, the operation and orientation of satellites, and even air travel as high altitude pilots and astronauts can be subjected to enhanced levels of radiation.

Internationally, the USGS magnetic observatory network is part of the global INTERMAGNET network. Domestically, the USGS Geomagnetism Program works cooperatively with government partners within the U.S. National Space Weather Program, including NOAA and the Air Force Weather Agency, and with private companies that are affected by space weather and geomagnetic activity.

Read the Oilfield Review article: Geomagnetic referencing - The real-time compass for directional drillers.

Watch a 7 minute video about the USGS Geomagnetism Program.

Read a USGS factsheet: Monitoring the Earth’s dynamic magnetic field

 

Division of Fish and Wildlife seeks volunteers for non-native plant weed-out at Cedar Swamp Wildlife Area on Jan 12

DNREC News - Wed, 12/18/2013 - 13:32
DOVER (Dec. 18, 2013) – DNREC’s Division of Fish and Wildlife is looking for volunteers to help with a habitat restoration project to remove non-native plants at the Cedar Swamp Wildlife Area east of Smyrna from 1 to 3 p.m. on Sunday, Jan. 12, 2014.

Crowd-Sourcing the Nation: 25,000 Manmade Map Features Edited

USGS Newsroom - Wed, 12/18/2013 - 12:30
Since the beginning of The National Map Corps crowd-sourcing project, more than 25,000 structure or manmade feature updates have been submitted to improve our nation’s maps. Contact Information:

Elizabeth  McCartney
Phone: 573-308-3696

Morgan Bearden
Phone: 573-308-3591

Mark Newell
Phone: 573-308-3850



Civilian volunteers are making significant additions to the U.S. Geological Survey's ability to provide accurate mapping information to the public. Using crowd-sourcing techniques, the USGS' Volunteered Geographic Information (VGI) project known as The National Map Corps (TNMCorps) encourages citizen volunteers to collect manmade structures data in an effort to provide accurate and authoritative spatial map data for the National Geospatial Program’s web-based The National Map

Structures being updated include schools, hospitals, post offices, police stations and other important public buildings.

Starting as a series of pilot projects in 2011, nearly 400 volunteers edited structures in the state of Colorado and contributed more than 6,800 edits.  With approval to expand the project, the USGS began releasing the rest of the United States for editing in a phased approach in April 2013.  By August of this year, volunteers were editing in every state in the country.  To date, the numbers of volunteers has more than tripled, and the number of submitted edits has exceeded 25,000.

The first available virtual badge, The Order of the Surveyor’s Chain, awarded to TNMCorps volunteers who collect more than 25 points. (High resolution image)

"The number of points contributed and edited by volunteers is incredible," said Kari Craun, the director of the National Geospatial Technical Operations Center. "Our challenge going forward will be to keep volunteers motivated and to make sure we have coverage in all areas of the United States.  We think at least part of that motivation will come from letting volunteers -- and potential volunteers -- know how valuable the information they contribute is to the USGS and to the users of the data.  So to all of those who have contributed, thank you for your time and energy!

To show appreciation of the volunteers' efforts, The National Map Corps has instituted a recognition program that awards "virtual" badges to volunteers. Each edit that is submitted is worth one point towards the badge level. The badges consist of a series of antique surveying instruments ranging from the Order of the Surveyor's Chain (25 – 50 points) to the Theodolite Assemblage (2000+ points). Additionally, volunteers are publically acknowledged (with permission) via TwitterFacebook and Google+.

Tools on TNMCorps web site explain how a volunteer can edit any area, regardless of their familiarity with the selected structures, and becoming a volunteer for TNMCorps is easy; go to The National Map Corps web site to learn more and to sign up as a volunteer. If you have access to the Internet and are willing to dedicate some time to editing map data, we hope you will consider participating.

 

 

 

Status map of the U.S. showing volunteer contributions after the first set of states were authorized, April 1 – June 18, 2013.

 (Larger image)

Status map of the U.S. showing the progression of volunteer contributions through all 50 states, April 1 - December 15, 2013.

 (Larger image)

A Tough Balance: Brown Trout Can Interfere with Brook Trout Conservation

USGS Newsroom - Wed, 12/18/2013 - 12:00

Cortland, N.Y.— Brown trout introductions could hamper the conservation of declining native brook trout populations, according to a new U.S. Geological Survey study.

Brook and brown trout are valuable sport fish that co-exist in many parts of the world due to stocking introductions. USGS researchers found that, in New York State, direct interactions between the two species, such as competition for food, have minor effects on diminishing brook trout populations compared to human-caused habitat disturbances. However, repeated, disproportionate stocking of brown trout in brook trout habitats could drastically decrease brook trout numbers.

"There is great potential for brown trout stocking to reduce native brook trout populations," said James McKenna, USGS scientist and lead author of the study. "But brown trout aren’t necessarily causing the current brook trout declines, and managers may be able to develop sustainable scenarios to support both fisheries."

The USGS study found that human-induced degradation (from dams and roads, among other causes) of the habitats of both species can affect the populations of either. However, because brook trout do better in forested watersheds, whereas brown trout can thrive in more agricultural environments, degraded watersheds and/or the elimination of forests may affect brook more than brown trout. Improper brown trout management could further threaten vulnerable brook trout populations.

Fisheries managers in New York use stocking to maintain brook trout—a native species—and/or brown trout—a non-native species stocked in New York for over 100 years—in some streams. Brook trout have been declining within its native range in recent decades, and there has been concern that the stocking of brown trout has caused these declines.

The report is published in the North American Journal of Fisheries Management and is available online.

For more information on USGS Great Lakes ecosystem research, please visit the USGS Great Lakes Science Center website.

Interior Announces Funding for New Scientific Studies as Part of President Obama's Climate Action Plan

USGS Newsroom - Wed, 12/18/2013 - 11:45
Research Designed to Fill Knowledge Gaps, Provide Land and Wildlife Managers with Tools to Adapt to Climate Change

WASHINGTON, DC—Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell announced today that Interior’s eight regional Climate Science Centers are awarding nearly $7 million to universities and other partners for research as part of President Obama’s Climate Action Plan to reduce carbon pollution, move our economy toward clean energy sources and begin to prepare our communities for the impacts of climate change. 

CADDO PARISH, LOUISIANA FLOOD MAPS BECOME FINAL IN FIVE MONTHS

FEMA Press Releases - Tue, 12/17/2013 - 18:02

DENTON, Texas –– New flood maps for Caddo Parish, Louisiana will become effective five months from now, on Monday, May 19, 2014. Local and federal officials encourage everyone to view the maps to understand their flood risk and consider purchasing flood insurance before then.

Language English
Categories: Federal News

Seventeen New Jersey Communities are Recognized for Reducing their Flood Risk through the Community Rating System

FEMA Press Releases - Tue, 12/17/2013 - 14:47

LINCROFT, N.J. -- Seventeen New Jersey municipalities will be recognized for reducing their flood hazard risk through the Community Rating System in awards ceremonies today and Wednesday, Dec. 18.

Language English
Categories: Federal News

FEMA Seeking Local Hires to Assist in Disaster Recovery

FEMA Press Releases - Tue, 12/17/2013 - 14:16

SPRINGFIELD, Ill. – Illinois residents will get the opportunity to assist with the state’s recovery from the Nov. 17 tornadoes while building their professional skills and drawing a paycheck. Temporary, full-time positions are available locally with the Federal Emergency Management Agency.                                                                

Language English
Categories: Federal News

Water Infrastructure Advisory Council to meet Thursday, Dec. 19 in Dover

DNREC News - Tue, 12/17/2013 - 13:38
DOVER (Dec. 17, 2013) – The Delaware Water Infrastructure Advisory Council (WIAC) will meet at 9 a.m. Thursday, Dec. 19 at the Kent County Administrative Complex, 555 S. Bay Road, Dover, Conference Room 220.

Bayshore Sewerage Authority Mitigation Protects the Environment

FEMA Press Releases - Tue, 12/17/2013 - 13:25

BAYSHORE SEWERAGE AUTHORITY MITIGATION PROTECTS THE ENVIRONMENT

LINCROFT, N.J. -- The effect Superstorm Sandy had on the environment was greater than what could be seen with the naked eye. While flooding, storm surges and high winds felled trees, destroyed beaches and dunes, and left waterways filled with debris, the damage the storm did to man-made structures also impacted many already environmentally sensitive areas.

Language English
Categories: Federal News

Delmarva Gis Conference Coming Up May 2014

DGDC News - Thu, 12/12/2013 - 09:05

DGDC welcomes our GIS friends from in and around Delaware to be a part of our 2014 Delmarva GIS Conference.

“We’re All Connected” is the theme of the 2014 Delmarva GIS Conference (formerly the Delaware GIS Conference). On Thursday, May 8th, 2014 the conference will be held at the Heritage Shores Club in Bridgeville, Delaware.

The plenary speaker will be Barney Krucoff, Geographic Information Officer for the State of Maryland.  Mr. Krucoff also serves on the Board of National Information Sharing Consortium.

The Conference Planning Committee is already hard at work planning for this event. Think about what you might like to contribute either as an abstract or a poster





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submittal. Presentations and posters can contribute points toward GISP certification. Abstract or poster submittals can be made to abstracts@degis.org.

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Categories: State of Delaware