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Louisiana Disaster Survivors May Find An SBA Loan Is the Key To Their Recovery

FEMA Press Releases - Fri, 04/08/2016 - 09:13

BATON ROUGE, La. –If you are one of the Louisiana flood and storm survivors referred to the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA), it’s important to complete and submit the loan application you receive to ensure that your disaster recovery process continues to move forward.

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Categories: Federal News

Disaster Recovery Centers Open in Roseland, Tangipahoa Parish, and Coushatta, Red River Parish for Louisiana Survivors

FEMA Press Releases - Fri, 04/08/2016 - 08:59

BATON ROUGE, La. – Disaster recovery centers will open Thursday, April 7, in Roseland, Tangipahoa Parish and Coushatta, Red River Parish to help Louisiana flood survivors. The centers are open 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Saturday and noon to 5 p.m. Sundays until further notice.

The disaster recovery centers are located at the following addresses:

The National Guard Pavilion RSA
62589 Holloway Rd.
Roseland, La.

 

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Categories: Federal News

State of the Survey

USGS Newsroom - Thu, 04/07/2016 - 12:41
Summary: USGS Director Suzette Kimball testified about the priorities and capabilities of the USGS today before the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee. Her written remarks follow: Readout from Director Kimball’s Testimony at the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee

Contact Information:

Anne Berry Wade ( Phone: 703-648-4483 ); David Hebert ( Phone: 703-648-4474 );



USGS Director Suzette Kimball testified about the priorities and capabilities of the USGS today before the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee. Her written remarks follow:

Chairman Murkowski and Ranking Member Cantwell, members of the committee, thank you very much for inviting me to testify today. I am excited for this opportunity to share some of my views on the state of the USGS and its mission. I would like to start this conversation with some history.

In 1879, Congress passed legislation that merged several Federal scientific and mapping surveys. We call this statute our Organic Act, because it inaugurated the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). From the beginning, the mission of this combined endeavor was not only to map the West and locate resources, but also to push the boundaries of science. USGS scientists, for almost 140 years now, have pursued that mission with an uncommon dedication. I am honored to be their 16th Director and cognizant of the responsibility that the President, the Congress, and this committee have entrusted to me.

Not only is the USGS older than 12 of the States, it is also the forbearer of several important government agencies, including the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management and the Bureau of Reclamation. In the time since we were established, technology and Earth science have evolved and we have evolved along with it, to meet the scientific needs of the Nation.  For example, with the increase in global demand for critical mineral commodities, USGS has focused on conducting research to understand geologic processes that have concentrated known mineral resources at specific localities in the Earth’s crust and to estimate or assess quantities, qualities and areas of undiscovered mineral resources, or potential future supply.  We have increased resources toward the National Geospatial program, earthquake early warning, volcano monitoring and the national streamgage network. USGS has also focused our activities on fulfilling statutory authorities, most recently by addressing national water availability and use through the SECURE Water Act.

Our evolution is evident, as you noted two years ago, Madame Chairman, in a resolution recognizing the anniversary of the massive earthquake that occurred in the Prince William Sound region of Alaska on March 27, 1964 (the Good Friday Earthquake). USGS science in response to that event helped confirm the theory of plate tectonics, fundamentally changing earthquake science.  Shortly thereafter, in 1966, Bill Pecora, our 8th Director, advocated for the use of satellites to study natural resources. This innovation led to Landsat and opened the age of Earth observation from space.

In 1995, Congress merged biologists from the National Biological Survey with the USGS, helping us to become an integrated Earth science agency. As scientific and technological advances have revealed the complexity of the issues we face, the value of bringing Earth science disciplines together has become ever more apparent. Today’s challenges demand the innovation made possible by integrating the full breadth of USGS capabilities. 

One example that illustrates the value of USGS’s diverse scientific capabilities is our leadership in understanding methylation processes of mercury. Mercury is a toxin that can build up in the food chain, becoming deadly to humans. It is most dangerous after undergoing a specific chemical change, methylation. Our geological expertise allows us to understand how and where methylation occurs, and our biological expertise allows us to understand how it affects plants, animals, and humans. Combining the talents, tools, and methods from these two disciplines is necessary to correctly assess methylmercury and its potential impacts.

I want to stress that we rely on numerous partnerships to pursue our scientific mission. The state geological surveys, universities, municipal governments, other Federal agencies, and foreign governments all count as critical partners of the USGS. As you may know, our budget is leveraged resulting in, approximately, an additional half a billion dollars contributed by our partners, especially State governments and other Federal agencies. We see this as an indication of their confidence in and support for our work. Such partnerships also have made it possible, for example, to create and publish a whole-lifecycle mining report, that offers industry and regulators guidance on how to site, develop, and close a mine with resource and environmental implications taken into account. In the future, we plan to do similar work for energy resources.

The USGS works closely with other Interior bureaus such as the Fish and Wildlife Service, the National Park Service, and the Bureau of Land Management, as well as other Federal agencies such as the Environmental Protection Agency, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Rather than duplicate those agencies’ missions, the USGS complements their research activities and contributes sound science for their decisionmaking. We are pleased to know that Congress looks to us, too, because researchers from the USGS are here hundreds of times a year meeting with you and your offices.

While I am proud of our integrated approach to problem solving, drawing on geological and biological science, remote sensing, epidemiology, ecology, or any of the myriad disciplines that constitute Earth science, innovation is the characteristic I most hope to nurture during my tenure in this office. While the Bureau has often been at the forefront of innovative research and science, we must take advantage of technological change and respond to emerging scientific directions to meet our full potential.

Today USGS labs are spearheading novel technologies.  For example we are using eDNA to monitor the spread of Asian carp.  We also work on other invasive species such as zebra mussels, brown tree snakes, and cheatgrass. Through our groundbreaking work on white-nosed syndrome, avian influenza and other wildlife diseases, the Bureau has become known as “the CDC of wildlife,” and is on the front lines of possible future epidemics.

One of our ongoing pursuits is 21st century mapping. In Alaska, we are harnessing our partnerships with the State and the University of Alaska, along with the technology of interferometric synthetic aperture radar, or ifsar, to produce modern geospatial information for the State. Back in the lower 48, high resolution elevation data are being collected using lidar technology by a coalition of Federal, State and private industry partners, to inform decisionmaking and enable newfound abilities like mapping and even forecasting landslides. The landslide tragedy at Oso, Washington, in 2014, not unlike the Good Friday Earthquake, pushes us to look farther, aim higher, and complete a scientific achievement worthy of the investment and trust placed in us by the American people.

Speaking of hazards, the USGS has long led Federal research into various geologic hazards and we are pressing forward on innovative approaches in this area, too. Along the West Coast, we are establishing, in cooperation with states, universities, and philanthropic partners, a state-of-the-art earthquake early warning system. This system could readily be expanded to Alaska and other high-risk regions of the country. We are also applying advanced telemetry and remote sensing technologies, making a volcano early warning system a reality. For many of your constituents, these are hazards they live with every day and they are also threats to the Nation as a whole.

The unknown unknowns of Earth science motivate us to advance our understanding of the natural world. As we look toward the future I see challenges where we are positioned to lead, all of which I have touched on: water security and availability, tools for protection from and response to natural hazards, assessment of critical minerals, forecasting and preventing biological threats, and creating the next generation of mapping tools and technology.

I have every confidence that the USGS will continue to meet these challenges, and I am heartened by a recent survey of marine and coastal scientists and managers which found the USGS to be the most credible Federal science agency. This is not a reason to boast, but a calling to meet such high expectations.

The mission of the USGS in the 21st century will not only be to locate natural resources for the benefit of the Nation, but to find ways of exploiting those resources sustainably so that our prosperity is not fleeting or fragile. For example, we are researching microbial production of natural gas, which may someday make it possible harness the energy of coal resources while avoiding many of the environmental costs traditionally associated with it. It is the job of the USGS, working with our partners, to help bring that future to fruition.

On behalf of the approximately 8,000 employees of the USGS, thank you again for inviting me here today. I would be happy to answer any questions you have.

New Maps for Texas and Oklahoma Released

USGS Newsroom - Thu, 04/07/2016 - 09:30
Summary: New US Topo maps for Texas and Oklahoma are now available in the USGS Store for free download. One of the main improvements is the inclusion of the U.S. Census Bureau’s Topologically Integrated Geographic Encoding and Referencing (TIGER) road data. Updated US Topo maps for Texas and Oklahoma available for download; add Census Bureau road data, wetlands layer and select trails

Contact Information:

Mark Newell, APR ( Phone: 573-308-3850 ); Larry  Moore ( Phone: 303-202-4019 );



New US Topo maps for Texas and Oklahoma are now available in the USGS Store for free download. One of the main improvements is the inclusion of the U.S. Census Bureau’s Topologically Integrated Geographic Encoding and Referencing (TIGER) road data.

“The US Topo digital maps are a great public resource to provide authoritative, robust maps to emergency management field personnel and first responders when response time matters”, said Michael Ouimet, Critical Information Systems Manager for the Texas Division of Emergency Management. “Our agency deployed the US Topo digital maps to our field personnel across the state.”

Other important additions to the new US Topo maps for Texas and Oklahoma are the integration of wetlands layers using data from the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service National Wetlands Inventory, along with the continued incorporation of “crowdsourced” trail data from the International Mountain Bike Association.

The US Topo map improvement program has entered its third, three-year cycle of revising and updating digital US Topo quadrangles. These new US Topo maps replace the second edition US Topo maps and are available for no-cost file download from The National Map, the USGS Map Locator & Downloader website , and several other USGS applications.

The USGS recently released US Topo maps for Wisconsin, Iowa and Kansas which were the first set of states to feature TIGER data. The TIGER database contains all geographic features — such as roads (more than 6.3 million miles), railroads, rivers, and legal and statistical geographic boundaries — needed to support the Census Bureau’s data collection and dissemination programs.

To compare change over time, scans of legacy USGS topo maps, some dating back to the late 1800s, can be downloaded from the USGS Historical Topographic Map Collection.

For more information on US Topo maps: http://nationalmap.gov/ustopo/.

Scan of the 1886 legacy topographic map quadrangle of the greater Austin, Texas area from the USGS Historic Topographic Map Collection Updated 2016 version of the East Austin US Topo quadrangle with orthoimage turned off to better see the improved road network. (1:24,000 scale) Updated 2016 version of the East Austin US Topo quadrangle with orthoimage turned on. (1:24,000 scale)

Nearly $3.3 Million in Disaster Assistance Distributed to Mississippi Storm Survivors

FEMA Press Releases - Wed, 04/06/2016 - 16:46

PEARL, Miss. – Nearly $3.3 million in state and federal disaster assistance has been disbursed to help those affected by the storms and flooding in Mississippi that began March 9, 2016.

The Federal Emergency Management Agency has been contacted by nearly 2,200 people for help or information regarding disaster assistance.

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Categories: Federal News

FEMA Launches New Preparedness Feature to Smartphone App

FEMA Press Releases - Wed, 04/06/2016 - 16:15

Push Notifications to Remind Users to Take Simple Steps to Prepare for Disasters, Provide Easy Access to Information on How to Be Ready for Fires, Severe Weather, and other Hazards

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Categories: Federal News

Disaster Recovery Centers Open in Pineville, Rapides Parish and Many, Sabine Parish for Louisiana Survivors

FEMA Press Releases - Wed, 04/06/2016 - 15:28

 

BATON ROUGE, La. – Disaster recovery centers will open Wednesday, April 6, in Pineville, Rapides Parish and Many, Sabine Parish to help Louisiana flood survivors. The centers are open 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Saturday and noon to 5 p.m. Sundays until further notice.

The disaster recovery centers are located at the following addresses:

The Old Cleco Bldg
201 Cleco Drive
Pineville, La.

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Categories: Federal News

DNRECs Division of Energy & Climate opens registration for Fueling the Future clean transportation event May 24 in Dover

DNREC News - Wed, 04/06/2016 - 12:56
DOVER (April 6, 2016) – DNREC’s Division of Energy & Climate invites fleet managers, businesses, public organizations and transportation professionals to attend Fueling the Future: Clean Transportation for a Greener Delaware

Delaware Waterfowl and Trout Stamp contests set for April 14

DNREC News - Wed, 04/06/2016 - 12:54
DOVER (April 6, 2016) – Wildlife art enthusiasts, stamp and print collectors, waterfowl hunters, anglers, birdwatchers and wetland conservationists will gather at 9:30 a.m. Thursday, April 14 at the Dover Public Library

Citizens Source Water Protection Committee to meet May 4 in Dover

DNREC News - Wed, 04/06/2016 - 12:51
DOVER (April 6, 2016) – The Source Water Protection Citizens and Technical Advisory Committee (CTAC) of the Source Water Assessment and Protection Program will meet from 9 a.m. to noon, Wednesday, May 4, in Conference Room 220 A&B of the Kent County Administrative Offices at 555 South Bay Road, Dover, DE 19901.

Mississippi Disaster Survivors: Don’t Be Victimized by Fraudulent Contractors or Disaster Workers

FEMA Press Releases - Wed, 04/06/2016 - 12:14

PEARL, Miss. – Mississippians whose homes were damaged in the recent storms and flooding may encounter people attempting to cheat them by posing as inspectors, government officials, volunteers or contractors. These people may try to obtain personal information or collect payment for disaster assistance or repairs.

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Categories: Federal News

Four Additional Texas Counties May Now Apply for Disaster Assistance

FEMA Press Releases - Wed, 04/06/2016 - 11:08

AUSTIN, Texas – At the request of the state of Texas, the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) has added Henderson, Limestone, Shelby and Tyler to the federal disaster declaration of March 19. They join the nine counties already approved for both Individual Assistance and Public Assistance: Erath, Gregg, Harrison, Hood, Jasper, Marion, Newton, Orange and Parker.  

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Categories: Federal News

Quitman County Disaster Recovery Center Opens for Disaster Survivors

FEMA Press Releases - Tue, 04/05/2016 - 17:23

PEARL, Miss. – A disaster recovery center is now open in Quitman County to provide assistance to survivors of the severe storms and flooding that began March 9, 2016.

Recovery centers are run jointly by the Mississippi Emergency Management Agency and the Federal Emergency Management Agency. Representatives of state, federal and voluntary agencies are set up in the center to explain the various programs designed to help survivors recover.

The Quitman County center is located at the Marks Fire Department, 108 W. Main St,

Marks, MS 38646.

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Categories: Federal News

Two Mississippi Counties Added to Federal Disaster Declaration for March Severe Storms and Floods

FEMA Press Releases - Tue, 04/05/2016 - 17:21

PEARL, Miss. – At the request of Governor Phil Bryant, the Federal Emergency Management Agency has amended a recent disaster declaration for severe storms and flooding that began March 9, 2016. Survivors in George and Pearl River counties can now register with FEMA for disaster assistance through the Individual Assistance program.

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Categories: Federal News

Volunteers Needed in Louisiana for Disaster Recovery

FEMA Press Releases - Tue, 04/05/2016 - 17:02

BATON ROUGE, La. – In the wake of a disaster, the people of Louisiana have always come together with compassion and courage to ask how they can help survivors.

Soon after a disaster people come forward to assist those in need. However, people often don’t realize there is still a great need a few weeks after the disaster. Currently, there is a shortage of volunteers, particularly in northern Louisiana.

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Categories: Federal News

More Louisiana Residents May Be Eligible for Federal Disaster Assistance, Urged to Register

FEMA Press Releases - Tue, 04/05/2016 - 16:49

Baton Rouge, La. – Louisiana disaster survivors in Catahoula, East Carroll, Franklin, Lincoln and St. Helena parishes may now be eligible for federal disaster assistance.
        
Their first step is to register with FEMA.

Individuals in the designated parishes who had storm damage may apply for federal disaster assistance three ways:

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Categories: Federal News

Delaware fourth graders Make a Splash and learn about protecting water resources

DNREC News - Tue, 04/05/2016 - 16:37
DOVER (April 5, 2016) – More than 720 fourth-grade students from seven elementary schools participated in today’s Make a Splash festival, an event that educates students on the diversity of estuary life and the importance of Delaware’s water resources.

Louisiana Survivors: Share Disaster Recovery Information with Friends and Neighbors

FEMA Press Releases - Tue, 04/05/2016 - 12:36

Baton Rouge, La. – Word of mouth is a powerful way to spread news. Amazing as it may seem, some people are so busy with their recovery from the March severe storms and floods, they may not have heard about federal help. Spread the word that the first step toward getting recovery assistance is to register with FEMA.

You could be the one to bring this important message to someone you know, perhaps a friend, neighbor, coworker, family member or acquaintance. Affected individuals, households and communities in Louisiana will be able to recover faster and stronger.

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Categories: Federal News

Alaska Still a Likely Portal for Avian Influenza

USGS Newsroom - Tue, 04/05/2016 - 12:00
Summary: ANCHORAGE, Alaska — The U.S. Geological Survey released additional evidence that western Alaska remains a hot spot for avian influenza to enter North America. The new report announces that while no highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses have been found in Alaska, the state remains an important area to monitor due to migratory bird flyways from North America and Eurasia that overlap the region.

Contact Information:

Andrew Ramey ( Phone: 907-786-7174 ); Paul  Laustsen ( Phone: 650-329-4046 );



ANCHORAGE, Alaska — The U.S. Geological Survey released additional evidence that western Alaska remains a hot spot for avian influenza to enter North America. The new report announces that while no highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses have been found in Alaska, the state remains an important area to monitor due to migratory bird flyways from North America and Eurasia that overlap the region.

“Our past research in western Alaska has shown that while we have not detected the highly pathogenic avian influenza virus, up to 70 percent of the other avian influenza viruses isolated in this area were found to contain genetic material from Eurasia, providing evidence for high levels of intercontinental viral exchange,” said Andy Ramey, a scientist with the USGS and lead author of the recent report. “This is because Asian and North American migratory flyways overlap in western Alaska.”

The designation of low or highly pathogenic avian influenza refers to the potential for these viruses to cause disease or kill chickens. The designation of “low pathogenic" or “highly pathogenic" does not refer to how infectious the viruses may be to humans, other mammals or other species of birds. Most strains of avian influenza are not highly pathogenic and cause few signs of disease in infected wild birds. However, in poultry, some low-pathogenic strains can mutate into highly pathogenic avian influenza strains that cause contagious and severe illness or death among poultry, and sometimes among wild birds as well.

Past research by the USGS, found low pathogenic H9N2 viruses in an Emperor Goose and a Northern Pintail. Both viruses were nearly identical genetically to viruses found in wild bird samples from Lake Dongting, China and Cheon-su Bay, South Korea. 

“These H9N2 viruses are low pathogenic and not known to infect humans, but similar viruses have been implicated in disease outbreaks in domestic poultry in Asia,” said Ramey. 

In the new report, the USGS collaborated with the Yukon Kuskokwim Health Corporation in Bethel, Alaska, and the Southeastern Cooperative Wildlife Disease Study in Athens, Georgia to obtain and test bird samples from Alaska Native subsistence hunters during spring of 2015. Hunters provided researchers with over 1,000 swabs from harvested water birds, the primary hosts of avian influenza viruses. 

Last year, the USGS published an article describing the introduction of highly pathogenic avian influenza into North America at the end of 2014, likely via migratory birds that migrated through Alaska. However, highly pathogenic avian influenza was never documented in Alaska. The highly pathogenic viruses spread throughout parts of the western and Midwestern U.S., impacting approximately 50 million poultry. However, those highly pathogenic viruses have now not been detected in North America since July 2015. 

This fall, the USGS will sample wild birds at Izembek National Wildlife Refuge. Most of those samples will come from sport hunters. 

The new report is entitled, “Surveillance for Eurasian-origin and intercontinental reassortant highly pathogenic influenza A viruses in Alaska, spring and summer 2015” and is published in Virology Journal.

Additional information about avian influenza can be found at the following websites: 

USGS Alaska Science Center

USGS National Wildlife Health Center USGS National Wildlife Health Center

Ecosystem Restoration Projects Generate Jobs and Business Activity in Local, Regional, and National Economies

USGS Newsroom - Tue, 04/05/2016 - 10:00
Summary: Riparian planting in the Powell River watershed in Lee County, Virginia. Part of the Lone Mountain NRDAR restoration. Photo credit: Upper Tennessee River Roundtable. Clearing of juniper in the Burley Landscape in Idaho. Photo credit: BLM. FORT COLLINS, Colo. – From restoring the sagebrush sea to rejuvenating watersheds and landscapes after fires, ecosystem restoration can bear substantial economic fruit for local, state and national economies, according to a USGS study published today.

Contact Information:

Heidi Koontz ( Phone: 303-202-4763 ); Catherine Puckett ( Phone: 352-377-2469 );



Riparian planting in the Powell River watershed in Lee County, Virginia. Part of the Lone Mountain NRDAR restoration. Photo credit: Upper Tennessee River Roundtable. Clearing of juniper in the Burley Landscape in Idaho. Photo credit: BLM.

FORT COLLINS, Colo. – From restoring the sagebrush sea to rejuvenating watersheds and landscapes after fires, ecosystem restoration can bear substantial economic fruit for local, state and national economies, according to a USGS study published today.

USGS economists evaluated 21 Department of the Interior restoration projects and found that for each dollar invested in ecosystem restoration, there was a two- to three-fold return in economic activity that rippled through local, regional and national economies. Case study projects include restoration activities associated with Natural Resource Damage Assessment sites and Bureau of Land Management sagebrush and sage-grouse habitat restoration, fuels reduction and post-fire restoration projects. 

“Based on case study results, we found that for every $1 million invested in ecosystem restoration, between $2.2 and $3.4 million flow through to the U.S. economy, demonstrating how such investments support jobs and livelihoods, small businesses and rural economies,” said USGS economist and lead author Catherine Cullinane Thomas. 

The report quantified methods to provide economic impact analyses focused on the jobs and business activity generated through money spent on ecosystem restoration activities.  The research was a joint project among the USGS, the DOI Natural Resource Damage Assessment and Restoration Program, the DOI Office of Policy Analysis, and the BLM Socioeconomics Program.

"This report highlights the importance of restoration activities not only for the benefit of natural resources impacted by oil spills or hazardous chemicals, but also for the economic well-being of human communities," said Steve Glomb, director of the DOI Office of Restoration and Damage Assessment.

"The study shows that these collaborative projects sustain our local economies in addition to restoring our nation's public lands and resources," said Josh Sidon, a BLM economist and study co-author.

All 21 case studies can be found at https://www.fort.usgs.gov/economic-impacts-restoration.

Economic impacts are reported as job-years, a measure of the total number of annualized full and part-time jobs accumulated over the duration of the restoration project.  Labor income is a measure of the wages and salaries earned through the jobs supported by project expenditures. Value added is a measure of the contribution to Gross Domestic Product. Economic output is a measure of the total value of the production of goods and services supported by project expenditures.

 

Highlighted Case Studies:

Sagebrush Steppe Restoration in South Beaver Area, Utah -

Through Utah’s Watershed Restoration Initiative, the BLM and other federal, state and local agencies and organizations teamed up to help restore and manage high-priority ecosystems in Utah, including portions of Colorado Plateau and Great Basin. WRI partners are providing better wildlife habitat, restoring critical watersheds and reducing the risk of wildfire to urban communities. To date, WRI partners have restored more than 1.1 million acres in Utah. Sagebrush restoration in the South Beaver area is one of many WRI projects. This area is crucial mule deer winter habitat, contains important elk habitat and historic sage-grouse habitat. Restoration in this area is ongoing and encompasses 145,000 acres.

 

Total cost of restoration:  $3.5 million, an estimated 72 percent spent locally in Beaver, Garfield, Iron, Kane and Washington counties in Utah.

Local economic impacts:

Labor income: $1.9 million

Local economic output: $4.2 million

Contribution to GDP:  $2.5 million

Job-years: 37

Regional economic impacts:

Labor income: $3.5 million

Regional economic output: $8 million

Regional contribution to GDP: $4.6 million

Job-years: 59

Burley Landscape Sage-Grouse Habitat Restoration

The area surrounding the BLM’s Burley Field Office in Idaho is home to a variety of species, such as the greater sage-grouse, mule deer, antelope, bighorn sheep and pygmy rabbit. In the late 1800’s, with the settlement of the west, this landscape began to shift from a sagebrush steppe ecosystem to woodlands dominated by Utah juniper and conifers, decreasing available habitat for sagebrush-dependent species such as the sage-grouse and mule deer.

Total cost of restoration: $1.4 million

 

Local economic impacts:

Labor income: $300,000

Local economic output: $450,000

Contribution to GDP: more than $310,000

Job-years: 8

Regional economic impacts:

Labor income: $1.6 million

Regional economic output: $3.1 million

Contribution to GDP: $1.9 million

Job-years: 42

 Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge (Crab Orchard NWR): Wastewater Treatment Plant Remediation and Restoration -

The Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge in southern Illinois has a unique history of industry, employment and restoration. During World War II, the War Department established the Illinois Ordnance Plant on the site to manufacture ammunition and bombs. Following the war, the land was transferred into the National Wildlife Refuge System. In 1987, because of extensive environmental contamination from the ordnance plant and other industrial tenants, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency designated the industrial complex as a Superfund site. The wastewater treatment plant on the Crab Orchard NWR is one of 21 sites on the refuge that have been remediated.

Total cost of restoration of wastewater treatment plant: $9 million, more than a third spent in local economy

Local economic impacts:

Labor income: $1.8 million

Local economic output: nearly $5 million

Contribution to GDP: contributed $3 million

Job-years: 32

National economic impacts:

Labor income: nearly $9 million

National economic output: $22 million

Contribution to GDP: more than $13 million

Job-years: 139

For more information on the other case studies in this report please see the accompanying website at https://www.fort.usgs.gov/economic-impacts-restoration. The USGS Open-File Report, Estimating the economic impacts of ecosystem restoration—methods and case studies, was authored by Catherine Cullinane Thomas, USGS; Christopher Huber, USGS; Kristin Skrabis, DOI; and Joshua Sidon, BLM.