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Stay Safe During Bitterly Cold Temperatures and Dangerous Snow Conditions

FEMA Press Releases - Tue, 01/06/2015 - 10:48

CHICAGO – Dangerously low temperatures and accumulating snow are in the forecast for much of the Midwest and the U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) wants individuals and families to be safe when faced with the hazards of cold temperatures and winter weather.

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Categories: Federal News

DNREC issues $10,000 penalty to Kelley Transport and Refuse, LLC of Denton, Md., for solid waste transportation violations in Delaware

DNREC News - Tue, 01/06/2015 - 10:26
DOVER (Jan. 6, 2015) – DNREC Secretary David Small has issued a Notice of Administrative Penalty and Secretary’s Order to Kelley Transport and Refuse, LLC for violations of Delaware’s laws and regulations governing the transportation of solid waste. The Secretary’s Order calls for $10,000 penalty and cost recovery for the Department of $1,500.

DNREC moves City of Rehoboth Beach wastewater disposal financing forward and agrees to a new discharge removal deadline

DNREC News - Mon, 01/05/2015 - 17:10
DOVER (Jan. 5, 2015) – DNREC Secretary David Small has signed a Record of Decision (ROD) concurring with an assessment by the City of Rehoboth Beach that an ocean outfall is the most environmentally and financially responsible alternative to the City’s current discharge of treated wastewater into the Lewes-Rehoboth Canal.

Endangered Salmon Population Monitored with eDNA for First Time

USGS Newsroom - Mon, 01/05/2015 - 14:00
Summary: CORVALLIS, Ore. — Scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey and Washington State University have discovered that endangered Chinook salmon can be detected accurately from DNA they release into the environment. The results are part of a special issue of the journal Biological Conservation on use of environmental DNA to inform conservation and management of aquatic species.

Contact Information:

Susan Kemp ( Phone: 541-750-1047 ); Paul Laustsen ( Phone: 650-329-4046 );



CORVALLIS, Ore. — Scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey and Washington State University have discovered that endangered Chinook salmon can be detected accurately from DNA they release into the environment. The results are part of a special issue of the journal Biological Conservation on use of environmental DNA to inform conservation and management of aquatic species.

The special issue contains eleven papers that move the detection of aquatic species using eDNA from concept to practice and include a thorough examination of the potential benefits, limitations and biases of applying eDNA methods to research and monitoring of animals. 

“The papers in this special edition demonstrate that eDNA techniques are beginning to realize their potential contribution to the field of conservation biology worldwide,” said Caren Goldberg, Assistant Professor at Washington State University and lead editor of the special issue.

DNA, or deoxyribonucleic acid, is the hereditary material that contains the biological instructions to build and maintain all life forms; eDNA is the DNA that animals release into the environment through normal biological processes from sources such as feces, mucous, skin, hair, and carcasses. Research and monitoring of rare, endangered, and invasive species can be done by analyzing eDNA in water samples.

A paper included in the special issue by USGS ecologists Matthew Laramie and David Pilliod, and Goldberg, looked at the potential for eDNA analysis to improve detection of Chinook salmon in the Upper Columbia River in Washington, USA and British Columbia, Canada. This is the first time eDNA methods have been used to monitor North American salmon populations. The successful project also picked up evidence of Chinook in areas where they have not been previously observed.

“The results from this study indicate that eDNA detection methods are an effective way to determine the distribution of Chinook across a large area and can potentially be used to document the arrival of migratory species, like Pacific salmon, or colonization of streams following habitat restoration or reintroduction efforts,” said Laramie.

Spring Chinook of the Upper Columbia River are among the most imperiled North American salmon and are currently listed as endangered under the Endangered Species Act. Laramie has been working with the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation Fisheries Program in the use of eDNA to document the success of reintroduction of Spring Chinook into the Okanogan Basin of the Upper Columbia River.

The papers of the special issue focus on techniques for analyzing eDNA samples, eDNA production and degradation in the environment and the laboratory, and practical applications of eDNA techniques in detecting and managing endangered fish and amphibians.

The co-editors, Goldberg, Pilliod, and WSU researcher Katherine Strickler, open the special issue with an overview on the state of eDNA science, a field developed from the studies of micro-organisms in environmental samples and DNA collected from ancient specimens such as mummified tissues or preserved plant remains.

“Incorporating eDNA methods into survey and monitoring programs will take time, but dedicated professionals around the world are rapidly advancing these methods closer to this goal,” said Goldberg.

Strickler, Goldberg, and WSU Assistant Professor Alexander Fremier authored a paper which quantified the effects of ultraviolet radiation, temperature, and pH on eDNA degradation in aquatic systems. Using eDNA from bullfrog tadpoles, the scientists determined that DNA broke down faster in warmer temperatures and higher levels of Ultraviolet-B light. 

“We need to better understand how long DNA can be detected in water under different conditions. Our work will help improve sampling strategies for eDNA monitoring of sensitive and invasive species,” said Strickler.

“These papers lead the way in advancing eDNA sample collection, processing, analysis, and interpretation,” said Pilliod, “eDNA methods have great promise for detecting aquatic species of concern and may be particularly useful when animals occur in low numbers or when there are regulatory restrictions on the use of more invasive survey techniques.”

How Does White-Nose Syndrome Kill Bats?

USGS Newsroom - Mon, 01/05/2015 - 12:00
Summary: For the first time, scientists have developed a detailed explanation of how white-nose syndrome (WNS) is killing millions of bats in North America, according to a new study by the U.S. Geological Survey and the University of Wisconsin New Science Helps Explain Hibernation Disease

Contact Information:

Marisa Lubeck ( Phone: 303-202-4765 ); Gail Moede Rogall ( Phone: 608-270-2438 );



For the first time, scientists have developed a detailed explanation of how white-nose syndrome (WNS) is killing millions of bats in North America, according to a new study by the U.S. Geological Survey and the University of Wisconsin. The scientists created a model for how the disease progresses from initial infection to death in bats during hibernation. 

“This model is exciting for us, because we now have a framework for understanding how the disease functions within a bat,” said University of Wisconsin and USGS National Wildlife Health Center scientist Michelle Verant, the lead author of the study. “The mechanisms detailed in this model will be critical for properly timed and effective disease mitigation strategies.” 

Scientists hypothesized that WNS, caused by the fungus Pseudogymnoascus destructans, makes bats die by increasing the amount of energy they use during winter hibernation. Bats must carefully ration their energy supply during this time to survive without eating until spring. If they use up their limited energy reserves too quickly, they can die. 

The USGS tested the energy depletion hypothesis by measuring the amounts of energy used by infected and healthy bats hibernating under similar conditions. They found that bats with WNS used twice as much energy as healthy bats during hibernation and had potentially life-threatening physiologic imbalances that could inhibit normal body functions. 

Scientists also found that these effects started before there was severe damage to the wings of the bats and before the disease caused increased activity levels in the hibernating bats.

“Clinical signs are not the start of the disease — they likely reflect more advanced disease stages,” Verant said. “This finding is important because much of our attention previously was directed toward what we now know to be bats in later stages of the disease, when we observe visible fungal infections and behavioral changes.” 

Key findings of the study include:

  • Bats infected with P. destructans had higher proportions of lean tissue to fat mass at the end of the experiment compared to the non-infected bats. This finding means that bats with WNS used twice as much fat as healthy control bats over the same hibernation period. The amount of energy they used was also higher than what is expected for normal healthy hibernating little brown bats.
  • Bats with mild wing damage had elevated levels of dissolved carbon dioxide in their blood resulting in acidification and pH imbalances throughout their bodies. They also had high potassium levels, which can inhibit normal heart function.  

The study, “White-nose syndrome initiates a cascade of physiologic disturbances in the hibernating bat host,” is published in BMC Physiology. Learn more about WNS, ongoing research and actions that are being taken here:

White-nose Syndrome Images

DNREC Fish and Wildlife encourages successful deer hunters to donate venison to Sportsmen Against Hunger

DNREC News - Fri, 01/02/2015 - 12:43
DOVER (Jan. 2, 2015) – With Delaware’s archery deer season continuing until Jan. 31 plus three more weeks of various firearm deer seasons coming up in January, DNREC’s Division of Fish & Wildlife reminds hunters that the state’s Sportsmen Against Hunger Program gratefully accepts donated venison for processing and distribution to participating charitable groups who provide meals for hungry Delawareans.

Delaware State Parks to celebrate the New Year with First Day Hikes across the state

DNREC News - Tue, 12/30/2014 - 13:41
DOVER (Dec. 30, 2014) – Delaware State Parks will sponsor free, guided hikes in nine state parks on New Year’s Day as part of America's State Parks First Day Hikes initiative. The hikes offer individuals and families an opportunity to begin the New Year by connecting with the outdoors on Jan. 1 at a state park close to home.

DNREC announces grant to help Delaware schools businesses and institutions with recycling programs

DNREC News - Mon, 12/29/2014 - 10:32
DOVER (Dec. 29, 2014) – To help Delaware’s schools, businesses and institutions start or expand their recycling programs, DNREC is once again offering the Universal Recycling Grant and Low Interest Loan Program, with up to $500,000 in funding available for grant proposals.

Holidays are the perfect time to recycle

DNREC News - Mon, 12/29/2014 - 10:28
DOVER (Dec. 29, 2014) – DNREC reminds Delawareans that holiday time is the right time to trim your “wasteline” while helping the environment – by recycling all those extra mail order boxes, gift-wrapped packages, tags and cards.

DNREC Fish and Wildlife Enforcement Blotter Dec 15 to 21

DNREC News - Wed, 12/24/2014 - 14:25
DOVER (Dec. 24, 2014) – To achieve public compliance through education and enforcement actions that help conserve Delaware’s fish and wildlife resources and ensure safe boating and public safety, DNREC Division of Fish & Wildlife Enforcement Natural Resources Police officers between Dec. 15-21 made 569 contacts with anglers, hunters, boaters and the general public, including 33 vessel boardings for boating safety and fishing regulation compliance checks. Agents issued 14 citations.

Precautions and vigilance urged for avian influenza

DNREC News - Wed, 12/24/2014 - 14:19
DOVER (Dec. 24, 2014) – Delaware authorities are urging poultry and bird owners to be vigilant in the wake of avian influenza cases reported in Oregon and Washington state.

FEMA Housing Mission Sees Continued Progress

FEMA Press Releases - Wed, 12/24/2014 - 14:13

DENVER - As 2014 comes to an end, the temporary housing program managed by the Federal Emergency Management Agency in the aftermath of the September 2013 foods continues to assist Colorado families while helping them secure permanent housing.  There are 13 households in Boulder, Weld and Larimer counties still residing in FEMA-provided manufactured housing units, with the program scheduled to be completed by mid-March. Over the course of this housing program, a total of 47 households in the three counties have found housing in FEMA-provided manufactured homes. 

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Categories: Federal News

DNREC, Delaware City Refining Co. reach settlement for water-related violations that includes installing improved fish return system

DNREC News - Wed, 12/24/2014 - 13:55
DOVER (Dec. 10, 2014)– DNREC Secretary David Small announced today that the department has entered into a penalty settlement agreement with the Delaware City Refining Company, LLC (DCRC) that will result in the company’s installation of modern technology to reduce impacts on aquatic life in the Delaware River and includes an improved fish return system at the Delaware City refinery’s water intake structure.

Public Invited to Comment on Aransas County, Texas, Preliminary Flood Maps

FEMA Press Releases - Tue, 12/23/2014 - 12:48

DENTON, Texas– Months of teamwork by officials from Aransas County and the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) have led to new preliminary flood maps. Now, the public is encouraged to participate in a 90-day appeal and comment period about the maps.

Homeowners, renters and business owners in Aransas County are encouraged to view the preliminary flood maps to better understand where flood risks have been identified. Those who would like to file an appeal have from December 18, 2014 until March 17, 2015 to submit them. 

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Categories: Federal News

Federal Aid Programs for State of New York Disaster Recovery

FEMA Press Releases - Mon, 12/22/2014 - 16:26

Following is a summary of key federal disaster aid programs that can be made available as needed and warranted under President Obama’s major disaster declaration issued for the State of New York.

Assistance for the State and Affected Local and Tribal Governments Can Include as Required:

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Categories: Federal News

President Declares Disaster for New York State

FEMA Press Releases - Mon, 12/22/2014 - 16:20

WASHINGTON, D.C. – The U.S. Department of Homeland Security's Federal Emergency Management Agency announced that federal disaster aid has been made available to the state of New York to supplement state, local and tribal recovery efforts in the area affected by a severe winter storm, snowstorm, and flooding during the period of November 17-26, 2014.

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Categories: Federal News

Disaster Assistance Tops $30 Million for South Napa Earthquake

FEMA Press Releases - Mon, 12/22/2014 - 15:46

SACRAMENTO, Calif. – State and federal disaster assistance now totals more than $30 million for people and businesses affected by the South Napa Earthquake. The current total includes $8.8 million in grants from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and the California Governor’s Office of Emergency Services (Cal OES), as well as $21.2 million in low-interest disaster loans from the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA).

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Categories: Federal News

One Week Left to Apply for South Napa Earthquake Disaster Assistance

FEMA Press Releases - Mon, 12/22/2014 - 15:09

SACRAMENTO, Calif. – Individuals and business owners in Napa and Solano counties who had damages or losses as a result of the South Napa Earthquake have one week left to register for disaster assistance with the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA).

Officials with FEMA and the California Governor’s Office of Emergency Services (Cal OES) urge anyone who still needs help to register before the deadline – Dec. 29, 2014.

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Categories: Federal News

Green Recovery Technologies, LLC withdraws Coastal Zone permit application from DNREC

DNREC News - Mon, 12/22/2014 - 10:57
DOVER (Dec. 22, 2014) – Green Recovery Technologies, LLC, a company with plans to develop product for the pet-food industry, has notified DNREC that it has voluntarily withdrawn its Coastal Zone Act (CZA) permit application.

DNREC Fish and Wildlife Enforcement Blotter Dec 8 to 14

DNREC News - Fri, 12/19/2014 - 17:44
DOVER (Dec. 19, 2014) – To achieve public compliance through education and enforcement actions that help conserve Delaware’s fish and wildlife resources and ensure safe boating and public safety, DNREC Division of Fish & Wildlife Enforcement Natural Resources Police officers between Dec. 8-14 made 1,125 contacts with anglers, hunters, boaters and the general public, including 74 vessel boardings for boating safety and fishing regulation compliance checks. Agents issued 35 citations.