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Keep Your Options Open – Submit an SBA Application Now

FEMA Press Releases - Wed, 11/18/2015 - 19:17

SACRAMENTO, Calif. – Wildfire survivors, don’t miss out on additional grants and loans that can help you recover – submit an application to the U.S. Small Business Administration today.

This notice applies to disaster survivors in Calaveras and Lake counties, California, who applied for assistance with the Federal Emergency Management Agency and were referred to the SBA. You must complete a disaster loan application in order to keep your options open and to maintain eligibility for additional FEMA dollars.

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Replacing personal documents after a natural disaster

FEMA Press Releases - Wed, 11/18/2015 - 19:13

SACRAMENTO, Calif. – Wildfire survivors in Calaveras and Lake counties who lost important documents can use this guide to help obtain replacements.

All of the organizations listed below offer online resources. If personal computers aren’t available, public libraries and other agencies may have computers available to the general public.

Document

Who to Contact for Replacement

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Churches and other nonprofits may rebuild with SBA disaster loans

FEMA Press Releases - Wed, 11/18/2015 - 19:10

SACRAMENTO, Calif. – Churches, temples, mosques and other religious centers, as well as other private nonprofit organizations affected by wildfires in California’s Calaveras and Lake counties, are eligible to apply for U.S. Small Business Administration low-interest disaster loans to help rebuild. The deadline to apply is Monday, Nov. 23, 2015.

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South Carolina Survivors Have Two Weeks to Apply for FEMA Assistance

FEMA Press Releases - Wed, 11/18/2015 - 15:02

COLUMBIA, S.C. – Two weeks remain for survivors of the Oct. 1-23 storms and flooding in South Carolina to register with the Federal Emergency Management Agency and submit loan applications to the U.S. Small Business Administration.

The registration deadline is Friday, Dec. 4. Once registered, you’re in the system. There is no need to register again.

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FEMA Public Assistance Grants to Help Washington Communities Recover from Wildfires

FEMA Press Releases - Wed, 11/18/2015 - 13:00

CAMP MURRAY, Wash. – Specialists from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and Washington State Emergency Management Division (EMD) are working closely with local and tribal officials to help Washington communities recover from this summer’s devastating wildfires.

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Public Assistance Grants to Help Washington Residents Recover from Wildfires

FEMA Press Releases - Wed, 11/18/2015 - 11:47

CAMP MURRAY, Wash. – Specialists from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and Washington State Emergency Management Division (EMD) are working closely with local and tribal officials to help Washington communities recover from this summer’s devastating wildfires.

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Public Assistance Grants Help Washington Communities Recover from Wildfires

FEMA Press Releases - Wed, 11/18/2015 - 11:25

CAMP MURRAY, Wash. – Specialists from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and Washington State Emergency Management Division (EMD) are working closely with local and tribal officials to help Washington communities recover from this summer’s devastating wildfires.

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Estimates of Undiscovered Copper in Middle East Ten Times Current World Production

USGS Newsroom - Wed, 11/18/2015 - 10:00
Summary: More than 180 million metric tons of undiscovered copper resources may be found in an area of the Middle East that covers Turkey, Georgia, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Iran, western Pakistan and southwestern Afghanistan, according to a recent assessment by the U.S. Geological Survey

Contact Information:

Alex Demas ( Phone: 703-648-4421 ); Jane Hammarstrom ( Phone: 703-648-6165 );



More than 180 million metric tons of undiscovered copper resources may be found in an area of the Middle East that covers Turkey, Georgia, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Iran, western Pakistan and southwestern Afghanistan, according to a recent assessment by the U.S. Geological Survey. This estimate is ten times the current annual world production for copper.

This region, the site of the ancient Tethys Sea, has a long history of mining copper, producing 420,000 metric tons in 2011 alone.  

“In an area known more for its oil, there’s a bounty of a mineral both critically and strategically important to the world’s economy,” said Larry Meinert, Program Coordinator of the USGS Mineral Resources Program. “Copper plays a vital role in all parts of our lives, from our coinage to musical instruments to our high-end electronics.”

This copper assessment is a synthesis of available information about where copper mineral deposits are known and suspected in the Earth’s crust and estimates of amounts of copper that may be present in undiscovered deposits. This assessment is part of a broader effort at assessing global mineral resources. Global totals of copper are estimated to be about 3,600 million metric tons of undiscovered resources.  

Copper is an important resource in the United States. In 2014, the United States consumed about 1.8 million metric tons of copper, while global consumption tallied about 20 million metric tons.

The United States currently has about 35 million metric tons of copper reserves, with an estimated 550 million metric tons in estimated undiscovered resources. The country with the largest reserves is Chile, with 209 million metric tons of reserves in 2014.

Copper plays a significant role in many parts of the U.S. economy. Its more common uses are in power generation and transmission, as well as electronics, such as smartphones. It’s also prominent in automobiles, with the average car containing nearly a mile of copper wiring.  

Some of copper’s less-known but still important roles are its use in frequently touched surfaces (such as brass doorknobs), where copper’s antimicrobial properties reduce the transfer of germs and disease.  It’s also used quite extensively in alloys with other metals, such as the brass in musical instruments or the copper-nickel alloy used to prevent barnacles from attaching to ship hulls.  

This assessment can be found online. The USGS Mineral Resources Program delivers unbiased science and information to understand mineral resource potential, production, consumption, and how minerals interact with the environment. To keep up-to-date on USGS mineral research, follow us on Twitter!

A map of the area covered in the assessment. Figure Credit: USGS (High resolution image)

Collect Points - Get The Patch

USGS Newsroom - Wed, 11/18/2015 - 09:00
Summary: Using crowdsourcing techniques, the USGS project known as The National Map Corps (TNMCorps) encourages volunteer “citizen scientists” to collect manmade structure data such as police stations, schools, hospitals and cemeteries, in an effort to provide more precise and authoritative spatial data for the USGS web-based mapping portal known as The National Map The USGS National Map Corps will award special edition patches for volunteers contributing 2,016 points between GIS Day 2015 and GIS Day 2016

Contact Information:

Elizabeth McCartney ( Phone: 573-308-3696 ); Mark Newell ( Phone: 573-308-3850 );



The image shows one of many possible badge designs. The final design will be selected in the coming months.(High resolution image)

Using crowdsourcing techniques, the USGS project known as The National Map Corps (TNMCorps) encourages volunteer “citizen scientists” to collect manmade structure data such as police stations, schools, hospitals and cemeteries, in an effort to provide more precise and authoritative spatial data for the USGS web-based mapping portal known as The National Map.

In celebration of these common passions and in honor of GIS Day and International Map Year, TNMCorps is encouraging volunteers to edit 2,016 features between GIS Day 2015 and GIS Day 2016. Each of those submitted edits are worth a point. Volunteers who contribute 2,016 edits and thus earning 2,016 points between November 18, 2015 and November 16, 2016 will be awarded with a special edition collectable embroidered patch.

“We’re excited about this ambitious challenge to our current and new National Map Corps members,” said Julia Fields, Deputy Director of the USGS National Geospatial Program, “and we are looking forward to seeing the patches on backpacks and jackets!”

Volunteer map editors are a fundamental component of TNMCorps and are critical to the success of the project. The project started in 2012, and since that time, an increasing number of volunteers have verified, edited, deleted, and created more than 160,000 structures points. 

Volunteering for TNMCorps is a great way for folks to get involved in building maps for their communities and the nation. Volunteers not only increase their geographic knowledge through the process, they make a significant contribution to the nation’s wealth of publicly available geographic information. TNMCorps volunteers are some of the many individuals who share a passion for geography, cartography and collaborative mapping initiatives.

"Having a patch to display my contribution to The National Map would be the perfect incentive for me to reach 2,016 submissions,” said Mattson Fields, a volunteer patch designer. “What a great way to break the ice and introduce The National Map Corps to friends and acquaintances."

All you need is access to the internet and willingness to learn. If you are interested in becoming a Volunteer Map Editor and/or participating in this initiative, please visit The National Map Corps for more information.

Follow progress and updates at The National Map Twitter #TNMCorps, @gisday, @mapyear

Cause of Deadly Disease in Snakes Identified

USGS Newsroom - Tue, 11/17/2015 - 10:00
Summary: The fungus Ophidiomyces ophiodiicola is the definitive cause of the skin infections in snakes known as snake fungal disease, or SFD, according to U.S. Geological Survey research published today in the journal mBio

Contact Information:

Marisa Lubeck ( Phone: 303-526-6694 ); Gail  Moede Rogall ( Phone: 608-270-2438 );



The fungus Ophidiomyces ophiodiicola is the definitive cause of the skin infections in snakes known as snake fungal disease, or SFD, according to U.S. Geological Survey research published today in the journal mBio

Wild snakes are valuable because they consume pests that damage agricultural crops, prey on rodents that can carry disease and serve as food for many predatory animals. However, some snake populations in the midwestern and eastern United States have declined since 2006 as a result of SFD, which produces thickened skin, ulcers and blisters. New USGS research provides the first direct evidence that O. ophiodiicola causes SFD, documents how the disease progresses and reveals how snakes respond to the infection.

“The loss of certain snake species in eastern North America could have widespread negative impacts on ecosystems,” said Jeffrey Lorch, a USGS National Wildlife Health Center scientist and the lead author of the study. “Pinpointing the SFD-causing fungus can help conserve snake populations threatened by this disease.”

The scientists infected eight healthy captive-bred corn snakes with O. ophiodiicola in the laboratory. Within days after exposure to the fungus, all snakes developed swelling followed by lesions identical to those observed in wild snakes with SFD. These lesions contained the same fungus to which the animals were exposed. Snakes that were not infected in the laboratory did not develop lesions and did not harbor O. ophiodiicola.

Most snakes responded to the fungus by repeatedly molting 15 to 20 days after exposure, but the disease caused potentially lethal behaviors that could increase their risk for predation or starvation in the wild. For example, infected snakes rested in exposed areas of their cages and some snakes were reluctant to eat. The uninfected snakes acted normally.

“These behaviors are uncharacteristic of healthy snakes and demonstrate how SFD can put snakes at risk in the wild,” Lorch said. “Climate change could promote growth of O. ophidiodiicola and hinder recovery from SFD because snake immunity is highly dependent on environmental conditions.”

O. ophiodiicola has consistently been found on snakes with SFD, but this new study is the first to prove that the fungus is the actual cause of the disease. The USGS has confirmed SFD in at least seven species of snakes in nine states: Illinois, Florida, Massachusetts, Minnesota, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Tennessee and Wisconsin.

For more information on SFD, please visit the USGS National Wildlife Health Center website.

FEMA, State Broadcasters’ Associations and Emergency Managers to Test the Emergency Alert System

FEMA Press Releases - Mon, 11/16/2015 - 15:07

WASHINGTON—The U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), in cooperation with state, local, and tribal emergency managers and state broadcasters’ associations, will conduct a test of the Emergency Alert System (EAS) on Tuesday, November 17, 2015 in six states at 1:20 p.m. PST. 

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USGS Seeks National Ground-Water Monitoring Network Proposals

USGS Newsroom Technical - Mon, 11/16/2015 - 10:34
Summary: The U.S. Geological Survey will award up to $2 million in cooperative agreements to support participation in the National Ground-Water Monitoring Network (NGWMN) in 2016.&nbsp

Contact Information:

Daryll Pope ( Phone: 609-771-3933 ); Jon Campbell ( Phone: 703-648-4180 );



The U.S. Geological Survey will award up to $2 million in cooperative agreements to support participation in the National Ground-Water Monitoring Network (NGWMN) in 2016. 

The USGS is working with the Federal Advisory Committee on Water Information’s (ACWI) Subcommittee on Ground Water (SOGW) to develop and administer the NGWMN.  The NGWMN is designed as a cooperative groundwater data collection, management, and reporting system that will be based on data from selected wells in existing federal, state, tribal, and local groundwater monitoring networks. The network is envisioned as a long-term collaborative partnership among federal and non-federal data providers that will help address present and future groundwater management questions facing the nation.

Cooperative agreements will provide support for both new and existing data providers in the NGWMN. The USGS will fund new data providers to select and classify sites within existing monitoring programs, to set up web services that will link the data to the NGWMN Portal, and to produce a report describing this process. Existing data providers will receive funds to maintain web services and keep site information current. Information about the cooperative agreements is available on the NGWMN Cooperative Agreements page.

Interested agencies may apply online at GRANTS.GOV under funding opportunity number G16AS00008. Applications will be accepted from November 16, 2015 through January 19, 2016. 

Two webinars are scheduled to review the application package and answer any question about the opportunity. These are scheduled for December 1st at 2 pm EST and December 8th at 1 pm EST. Registration for the webinars is required. After your registration is accepted, you will receive meeting information. You may register for the webinars at:

December 1st
https://usgs.webex.com/usgs/j.php?RGID=r3e8551da16b8fd2f966ca1fab6e577bb

December 8th
https://usgs.webex.com/usgs/j.php?RGID=re7d637eb23fa127b87846fcc85ccca9d

 

Understanding how Pharmaceuticals in the Environment Affect Fish

USGS Newsroom Technical - Fri, 11/13/2015 - 12:29
Summary: Fish health may be affected by pharmaceuticals in treated wastewater released into streams and other water bodies, according to a recent laboratory and field study by the Aquatic Toxicology Laboratory at St. Cloud State University and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Results Show Impacts to both Juveniles and Adults

Contact Information:

Heiko  Schoenfuss, SCSU ( Phone: 320-308-3130 ); Dana  Kolpin, USGS ( Phone: 319-358-3614 );



Fish health may be affected by pharmaceuticals in treated wastewater released into streams and other water bodies, according to a recent laboratory and field study by the Aquatic Toxicology Laboratory at St. Cloud State University and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). This research is published in a special edition of Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry related to pharmaceuticals in the environment.

This study looked for effects from nine individual pharmaceuticals, as well as varying mixtures of these chemicals, on both juvenile and adult fathead minnows. The selected pharmaceuticals and corresponding exposure levels for the laboratory experiments were guided by previous USGS research.

”Exploring the effects of multiple pharmaceuticals in mixtures at concentrations previous measured in the environment provided for immediate relevance of the study,” said St. Cloud State University scientist Heiko Schoenfuss, the lead author of the study. “The pharmaceuticals studied are highly prescribed and have been found in the environment in previous studies, including by our USGS co-authors.”

Prior USGS research has also documented the release of pharmaceuticals is greater in areas where local sources of pharmaceuticals, such as medicinal manufacturers, may contribute a disproportionately larger amount of pharmaceuticals to wastewater treatment plants. In addition, one of the wastewater treatment plants receiving waste from pharmaceutical manufacturing was also used for the field component of this research.

Fathead minnows were used as they are a common laboratory model for studies of this kind and are also an ecologically important species that can be found throughout North America. The minnows were exposed to both individual pharmaceuticals and mixtures of these chemicals in a laboratory setting as well as to treated wastewater at a wastewater treatment plant to represent a real world setting.

“Including the field exposures was an important part of this study,” said USGS scientist Dana Kolpin, one of the study’s co-authors. “Our research documented that effects observed in the field are not always easily reconciled by laboratory studies because of the full complexity of real-world conditions. Because of this, it’s crucial to include a wide variety of conditions and organism life stages when assessing the effects of pharmaceuticals on aquatic ecosystem health.”

A comprehensive suite of symptoms of adverse health effects across minnow life stages were assessed for this study. Juvenile fathead minnows exposed to the pharmaceuticals suffered from reduced growth and altered escape behavior. This means that, when faced with a threat, the minnows did not escape as efficiently as they normally would, potentially increasing the chances they would be eaten and that could ultimately translate to population level effects.

Interestingly, adult females and males were found to react differently to pharmaceutical exposures. Adult females generally experienced an increase in relative liver size compared to control females, suggesting that the liver is reacting to the influx of pharmaceuticals.

Meanwhile, adult males exposed to the pharmaceuticals had a variety of reactions. Most did not defend their nests as rigorously as those that were not exposed to the pharmaceuticals. The males exposed to wastewater treatment plant effluent in the field component of this research ended up producing a chemical known as plasma vitellogenin, a protein associated with egg production in females and is an indicator of feminization of male fish.

The following pharmaceutical chemicals were studied:

  1. Hydrocodone: an opioid pain reliever
  2. Methadone: an opioid pain reliever
  3. Oxycodone: an opioid pain reliever
  4. Tramadol: an opioid agonist pain reliever
  5. Methocarbamol: a muscle relaxant
  6. Fluoxetine: an antidepressant
  7. Paroxetine: an antidepressant
  8. Venlafaxine: an antidepressant
  9. Temazepam: a sleep aid

The paper describing the results of this study in detail can be found in Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, and is part of a long-term effort to understand the fate and effects of contaminants of emerging concern and to provide water-resource managers with objective information that assists in the development of effective water management practices.

To learn more about the study, please see our science feature. To learn more about USGS environmental health science, please visit the USGS Environmental Health website and sign up for our GeoHealth Newsletter.

Storage and Treatment of Liquid Waste from Landfills Doesn’t Remove All Contaminants, Including Pharmaceuticals

USGS Newsroom Technical - Thu, 11/12/2015 - 18:17
Summary: New research from the U.S. Geological Survey details that even after the storage and/or treatment of leachate – liquid waste that moves through or drains from a landfill − it can still contain a multitude of chemicals and reflects the diverse nature of residential, industrial, and commercial waste discarded into landfills in the United States

Contact Information:

Heidi Koontz ( Phone: 303-202-4763 ); Dana Kolpin ( Phone: 319-358-3614 );



Examples of treated and stored liquid waste samples collected for this study. An onsite landfill leachate storage lagoon. (high resolution image)

Manhole access as leachate leaves a landfill and enters a sewer that pipes leachate to a wastewater treatment plant. (high resolution image)

New research from the U.S. Geological Survey details that even after the storage and/or treatment of leachate – liquid waste that moves through or drains from a landfill − it can still contain a multitude of chemicals and reflects the diverse nature of residential, industrial, and commercial waste discarded into landfills in the United States.

The paper, authored by USGS scientist Jason Masoner and colleagues, appears in the latest edition of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry and confirms what goes into landfills via human disposal isn’t necessarily trash’s final resting place.

This national-scale study collected and analyzed treated and stored liquid waste samples from 22 landfills across the United States looking for 190 contaminants of emerging concern (CECs) including pharmaceuticals, hormones, household products, and industrial chemicals and follows a previously published USGS landfill study that assessed leachate prior to any storage and/or treatment (i.e. untreated liquid waste).

"The importance of moving our landfill research from examining untreated liquid waste to treated and stored liquid waste is that the treated product provides a much better understanding of chemical concentrations that are actually being put into the environment by landfills," said Masoner. "Such input pathways include discharge to streams, seepage into groundwater, diversion to wastewater treatment plants, and even onsite spraying or irrigation."

Treated and stored liquid waste samples contained 101 of the 190 CECs analyzed for this study, with such CECs being found in every leachate sample collected with as many as 58 chemicals detected in a single sample. Observed concentrations ranged from as low as 2 parts per trillion (ng/L) for estrone (natural hormone) to as high as 17,200,000 ng/L for bisphenol A (chemical with a wide variety of uses such as in plastics and thermal paper).

A detailed comparison of CEC concentrations between landfills that were included in both USGS studies (i.e. untreated liquid waste versus treated and stored liquid waste) found that levels of CECs were significantly less in treated and stored liquid waste compared to untreated liquid waste samples. Nevertheless, treated and stored liquid waste still contained a complex mixture of CECs with the largest levels exceeding 1,000,000 ng/L.

"This research is the first step in understanding environmental exposures to contaminants originating from liquid wastes in landfills," said Mike Focazio, coordinator for the USGS Toxics Substances Hydrology Program.

Map showing states where final leachate was sampled from 22 landfills in 2011 and 2012.  (high resolution image)

Flood Risk Open House to View Maps in Raymondville and Brownsville, Texas -REVISED

FEMA Press Releases - Thu, 11/12/2015 - 17:45
Flood Risk Open House to View Maps in Raymondville and Brownsville, Texas

Public Open House Events Scheduled to Share Map Changes and Flood Risk Information
(Please note correction below to address for open house in Willacy County.)

DENTON, Texas –Homeowners, renters and business owners in the Texas counties of Cameron and Willacy are encouraged to look over newly released preliminary flood maps in order to determine their flood risks and make informed decisions.

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Arctic Tundra Fire Causes Widespread Permafrost Landscape Changes

USGS Newsroom - Thu, 11/12/2015 - 13:00
Summary: Large and severe tundra fires cause top down permafrost thaw, playing a major role in altering Arctic landscapes according to a new study led by the U.S. Geological Survey

Contact Information:

Yvette Gillies ( Phone: 907-786-7039 ); Paul  Laustsen ( Phone: 650-329-4046 );



A photo from the study area acquired in August 2015 showing thermokarst development manifest as a network of troughs forming over degrading ice wedges (left). Comparison between the two airborne LiDAR data showing permafrost terrain subsidence in the aftermath of a large and severe Arctic tundra fire. (High resolution image)

ANCHORAGE, Alaska – Large and severe tundra fires cause top down permafrost thaw, playing a major role in altering Arctic landscapes according to a new study led by the U.S. Geological Survey. 

The study documented widespread thermokarst formation, characterized by subsidence of the land surface as a result of melted ground-ice, in the years following a tundra fire event. Thaw of ice-rich permafrost is known to impact terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems by altering vegetation communities and hydrology as well as releasing carbon that was previously stored in the frozen ground below.   

"Thermokarst development may sound like an esoteric topic, but when ground ice melts it affects everything at the surface, formation or drainage of lakes, how much water runs off the landscape and what kind of plants can grow," said Philip Martin, Science Coordinator for the Arctic Landscape Conservation Cooperative. "This is an essential part of the puzzle for resource managers and Arctic residents to piece together how the land is changing." 

Researchers, led by the USGS, used repeat airborne LiDAR data acquisitions, a remote sensing tool that allows for the creation of highly detailed topographic models of the landscape, to quantify thermokarst development in the aftermath of the 2007 Anaktuvuk River tundra fire. By comparing data obtained two and again seven years post-fire, researchers determined that thermokarst affected more than 34 percent of the studied burned tundra area compared to less than one percent in similar unburned tundra. 

Arctic tundra fires are known to have an immediate and severe impact on the landscape through combustion of vegetation and soil organic layers. However, widespread thermokarst development in the aftermath of an Arctic tundra fire had not been previously measured in detail. 

"With LiDAR data acquisitions, we are able to document landscape changes in a measurable way like never before," said lead author Benjamin Jones, a Research Geographer with the USGS. "It is likely that the impact of fires and other disturbances on permafrost-influenced terrain in the Arctic has been underestimated since highly precise elevation data, such as from LiDAR datasets, are not widely available in these regions."

The paper "Recent Arctic tundra fire initiates widespread thermokarst development" was published in the journal Scientific Reports, the online open access journal from the publishers of Nature.

The work was supported by the Land Change Science and Land Remote Sensing programs at the USGS, the USGS Alaska Science Center, the Arctic Landscape Conservation Cooperative, the University of Alaska Fairbanks, and the Alfred Wegener Institute Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research.  

Disaster Recovery Centers Closed Sundays, Thanksgiving

FEMA Press Releases - Thu, 11/12/2015 - 10:24

COLUMBIA, S.C.All but two disaster recovery centers will be closed on Sundays beginning Nov. 15. The center at the Sheriff’s Office in Newberry will be closed Sundays beginning Nov. 22. The center located at the Beck Recreation Center in Georgetown remains open on Sunday until further notice.

All centers will be closed Nov. 26 for Thanksgiving.

Survivors can locate their closest center by visiting asd.fema.gov/inter/locator/home.htm.

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Categories: Federal News

FEMA Mitigation Advisers Offer Guidance to Flood Survivors in Florence and Horry Counties

FEMA Press Releases - Wed, 11/11/2015 - 18:54

COLUMBIA, S.C. – As South Carolinians rebuild and repair after the recent historic floods, the Federal Emergency Management Agency and local home improvement stores have teamed up to provide free information, tips and literature on making homes stronger and safer.

FEMA mitigation specialists will be on hand in Horry and Florence counties to answer questions and offer home improvement tips to prevent and lessen damage from future disasters. Most of the information is geared towards do-it-yourself work and general contractors.

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Categories: Federal News

FEMA Mitigation Advisers Offer Guidance to Flood Survivors in Charleston County

FEMA Press Releases - Wed, 11/11/2015 - 18:49

COLUMBIA, S.C. – As South Carolinians rebuild and repair after the recent historic floods, the Federal Emergency Management Agency and local home improvement stores have teamed up to provide free information, tips and literature on making homes stronger and safer.

FEMA mitigation specialists will be on hand in Charleston County to answer questions and offer home improvement tips to prevent and lessen damage from future disasters. Most of the information is geared towards do-it-yourself work and general contractors.

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Categories: Federal News

FEMA Mitigation Advisers Offer Guidance to Flood Survivors in Richland County

FEMA Press Releases - Wed, 11/11/2015 - 18:42

COLUMBIA, S.C. – As South Carolinians rebuild and repair after the recent historic floods, the Federal Emergency Management Agency and local home improvement stores have teamed up to provide free information, tips and literature on making homes stronger and safer.

FEMA mitigation specialists will be on hand in Richland County to answer questions and offer home improvement tips to prevent and lessen damage from future disasters. Most of the information is geared towards do-it-yourself work and general contractors.

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Categories: Federal News