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Federal News

President Declares Disaster for Pennsylvania

FEMA Press Releases - Wed, 03/23/2016 - 18:17

WASHINGTON, D.C.  – The U.S. Department of Homeland Security's Federal Emergency Management Agency announced that federal disaster aid has been made available to the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania to supplement commonwealth and local recovery efforts in the area affected by the severe winter storm and snowstorm during the period of January 22-23, 2016.

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USGS Assesses 39–54 Billion Metric Tons of Undiscovered Potash Resources in Central Asia

USGS Newsroom Technical - Wed, 03/23/2016 - 12:00
Summary: The Central Asia Salt Basin of Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, Tajikistan and Afghanistan has the potential to contain between 39 and 54 billion metric tons of undiscovered potash resources, according to a global mineral resource assessment led by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). Known potash resources in the Central Asia Salt Basin consist of 1.63 billion metric tons.

Contact Information:

Alex Demas ( Phone: 703-648-4421 ); Jeff Wynn ( Phone: 360-993-8919 );



The Central Asia Salt Basin of Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, Tajikistan and Afghanistan has the potential to contain between 39 and 54 billion metric tons of undiscovered potash resources, according to a global mineral resource assessment led by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). Known potash resources in the Central Asia Salt Basin consist of 1.63 billion metric tons.

Potash is produced worldwide at amounts exceeding 30 million metric tons per year, mostly for use in fertilizers. The term “potash” refers to potassium-bearing, water-soluble salts derived from evaporite basins, where seawater dried up and precipitated various salt compounds; the word for the element “potassium” is derived from potash. In fact, industry uses potash to refer to potassium chloride, as well as potassium sulfate, nitrate, and oxide forms.

The Central Asia Salt Basin hosts significant discovered potash resources and originated in an inland sea during Late Jurassic time. Seawater flowed into the Basin, mostly from its extreme northwestern margin near the modern Caspian Sea, during several evaporation episodes that deposited at least five different packages of evaporites, with virtually all potash in the second and fourth packages.

In this study, the Central Asia Salt Basin was subdivided into three tracts, also known as permissive areas, for evaluation: the Amu Darya tract in the west, the Gissar tract in the center, and the Afghan-Tajik tract in the east. The Gissar and Amu Darya tracts were each quantitatively assessed. The Afghan‑Tajik tract was only qualitatively assessed because of the extreme depth (as deep as 7 km) of the Jurassic salt, extensive deformation and a lack of known potash deposits.

In 2010, world potash production was about 33 million metric tons of K2O-equivalent (PDF). Canada was the largest producer of potash (9.5 million metric tons K2O-equivalent in 2010), followed by Russia, Belarus, China, Germany, Israel and Jordan. Potash is produced in many countries throughout the world, but production is concentrated in North America and Eurasia. Each of the 12 major potash-producing countries produced 1 million metric ton or more in 2010; production from other countries was less than 1 million metric ton each.

The USGS Mineral Resources Program delivers unbiased science and information to understand mineral resource potential, production, consumption, and how minerals interact with the environment. To keep up-to-date on USGS mineral research, follow us on Twitter!

Disaster Recovery Centers Open in Covington, Jena and Ringgold, Louisiana

FEMA Press Releases - Wed, 03/23/2016 - 10:54

BATON ROUGE, La. –Disaster recovery centers will open Thursday, March 24, in Covington, Jena and Ringgold to help Louisiana flood survivors. The centers are open 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Saturday and noon to 5 p.m. Sundays until further notice. The centers will be closed on Easter Sunday, March 27.

The disaster recovery centers are located at the following addresses:

Bienville Courthouse Annex
2145 Mill St.
Ringgold, La., Bienville Parish

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Categories: Federal News

Partner Summit at Pine Ridge

FEMA Press Releases - Tue, 03/22/2016 - 17:03

Bringing to light the disaster recovery needs of the Oglala Lakota Sioux tribe was the focus of a summit hosted by the Center for Disaster Philanthropy (CDP) and the South Dakota Voluntary Organizations Active in Disasters (VOAD). The Summit, held on March 11 at the Prairie Winds Casino on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, brought together more than 70 individuals representing 37 agencies seeking to learn how they can assist this community in need.

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Disaster Recovery Centers Open in Two Louisiana Parishes

FEMA Press Releases - Tue, 03/22/2016 - 16:56

BATON ROUGE, La. –Disaster recovery centers will open Monday, March 21, in Monroe and Slidell to help Louisiana flood survivors. The centers are open 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Saturday and noon to 5 p.m. Sunday until further notice. The centers will be closed on Easter Sunday, March 27.

The disaster recovery centers are located at the following addresses:

Monroe Civic Center
401 Lea Joyner Expressway
Monroe, Ouachita Parish, La.

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Categories: Federal News

Mobile Disaster Recovery Center Opens in Bogalusa, Washington Parish, Louisiana

FEMA Press Releases - Tue, 03/22/2016 - 16:19

BATON ROUGE, La. – A mobile disaster recovery center will open Tuesday, March 22, in Bogalusa to help Louisiana flood survivors. The center is open 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Saturday and noon to 5 p.m. Sundays until further notice. The center will be closed on Easter Sunday, March 27.

The disaster recovery center is located at the following address:

Softball Fields Parking Lot
200 West 9th St.
Bogalusa, Washington Parish, La.

                                                                    

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Categories: Federal News

Clackamas County Added to Oregon Disaster Declaration

FEMA Press Releases - Tue, 03/22/2016 - 16:12

SALEM, OR – Clackamas County has joined Douglas County, Oregon, as recent eligible entities for Federal disaster assistance as a result of the severe winter storms, straight-line winds, flooding, and landslides and mudslides occurring Dec. 6-23, 2015, the Oregon Office of Emergency Management (OEM) and Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) announced today.

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Drought and Management Actions Affect World Waterway--the Rio Grande

USGS Newsroom - Tue, 03/22/2016 - 14:19
Summary: New research can help water managers along the Rio Grande make wise decisions about how to best use the flow of a river vital for drinking water, agriculture and aquatic habitat. These studies also show how conditions from the prolonged drought in the West have affected the Rio Grande watershed

Contact Information:

Heidi Koontz ( Phone: 303-202-4763 ); Jennifer LaVista ( Phone: 720-480-7875 );



 

In recognition of World Water Day and in conjunction with the White House Water Summit, the U.S. Geological Survey is raising awareness of water issues and potential solutions in the United States.

 

New research can help water managers along the Rio Grande make wise decisions about how to best use the flow of a river vital for drinking water, agriculture and aquatic habitat. These studies also show how conditions from the prolonged drought in the West have affected the Rio Grande watershed.

The Rio Grande forms the world’s longest river border between two countries as it flows between Texas and Mexico, where it is known as the Rio Bravo. The river runs through three states in the U.S., beginning in southern Colorado and flowing through New Mexico and Texas before it forms the border with Mexico.

Parts of the Rio Grande are designated as wild and scenic, but most of the river is controlled and passes through several dam and reservoir systems during its 1,896 mile journey to the Gulf of Mexico. The river is managed through a complex system of compacts, treaties, and agreements that determine when and how much water is released along the river’s length.

The amount and timing of water releases have varied in recent years due to drought. Recent USGS research on the middle Rio Grande looked at the effects of those changes on the amount of salts that build up in the Rincon and Mesilla Valleys in Texas and New Mexico. Results showed a decline in the amount of salt carried by the river due to a decrease of releases during the drought. The two valleys responded differently to the decreased releases. Salt levels in the Rincon Valley declined, whereas salt levels in the Mesilla Valley increased. Salt buildup in the soil and water can affect agriculture, which is an important industry in those valleys.

Successfully managing water use along the river is important to the sustainability of agricultural and communities along the river. To help with that goal, USGS has measured water gains and losses to the Rio Grande from between the Leasburg Dam near Leasburg, New Mexico, and the American Dam near El Paso, Texas. American Dam is near where the Rio Grande becomes the border with Mexico. For the past several years, drought conditions contributed to decreasing flows along this 64-mile stretch, and sections of the river were dry during parts of the year.

Flow in the Rio Grande is affected by how water is used throughout the basin. For instance, the Albuquerque area of New Mexico has two principal sources of water: groundwater from the underlying aquifer system and withdrawals and diversions from the Rio Grande. From 1960 to 2002, pumping from the aquifer system caused groundwater levels to decline from about 40 feet along the Rio Grande in Albuquerque to more than 120 feet in the valley away from the river. As a result, the USGS, in cooperation with the Bureau of Reclamation, conducted a study to understand the exchange of water between the Rio Grande and the aquifer system.

By characterizing the interaction between surface water from the Rio Grande and groundwater from the aquifer system, scientists provide valuable information to help managers make informed decisions about water use.

In addition to helping decision makers determine how to best manage the river for human use, USGS scientists are studying how native fish and their aquatic habitats are affected by different streamflow conditions along the river. For example, previous investigations have shown that the decline in Rio Grande silvery minnow may be attributed to modifications of the natural streamflow regime, channel drying, construction of reservoirs and dams, stream channelization, declining water quality, and interactions with nonnative fish. Understanding native species habitat limitations is important for decision makers to better plan future flow operations to meet desired resource goals.

More information on the research and results discussed in this release can be found in the following studies:

Mobile Disaster Recovery Center Opens in Bogalusa, Washington Parish, Louisiana

FEMA Press Releases - Tue, 03/22/2016 - 11:32

BATON ROUGE, La. – A mobile disaster recovery center will open Tuesday, March 22, in Bogalusa to help Louisiana flood survivors. The center is open 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Saturday and noon to 5 p.m. Sundays until further notice. The center will be closed on Easter Sunday, March 27.

The disaster recovery center is located at the following address:

Softball Fields Parking Lot
200 West 9th St.
Bogalusa, Washington Parish, La.

More centers are planned to open in other parishes.

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Disaster Recovery Centers Open in Colfax and Minden, Louisiana

FEMA Press Releases - Tue, 03/22/2016 - 10:58

BATON ROUGE, La. –Disaster recovery centers will open Tuesday, March 22, in Colfax and Minden to help Louisiana flood survivors. The centers are open 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Saturday and noon to 5 p.m. Sundays until further notice. The centers will be closed on Easter Sunday, March 27.

The disaster recovery centers are located at the following addresses:

Grant Parish Civic Center
1208 Main St.
Colfax, La.

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Categories: Federal News

2016 Doug D. Nebert NSDI Champion of the Year Award

USGS Newsroom Technical - Tue, 03/22/2016 - 09:30
Summary: The Federal Geographic Data Committee is now accepting nominations for the Doug D. Nebert National Spatial Data Infrastructure (NSDI) Champion of the Year Award. Doug was a recognized national and international leader in the establishment of spatial data infrastructures and technical visionary as well as respected colleague. Calling for nominations to honor outstanding accomplishments to the spatial data infrastructure mission of the Department of Interior

Contact Information:

Mark Newell, APR ( Phone: 573-308-3850 ); Gita  Urban-Mathieux ( Phone: 703-648-5175 );



The Federal Geographic Data Committee is now accepting nominations for the Doug D. Nebert National Spatial Data Infrastructure (NSDI) Champion of the Year Award. Doug was a recognized national and international leader in the establishment of spatial data infrastructures and technical visionary as well as respected colleague.

Doug Nebert presenting at a conference, expanding on his vision of National Spatial Dataset Infrastructure issues (undated photo). Doug Nebert getting ready to lift off in a private plane, his other lifelong passion (undated photo).

To commemorate Nebert’s varied contributions to and passions for our nation’s geography and cartography, the FGDC is accepting nominations for the newly established award.

“This award commemorates Doug’s influence in promoting the vision of the NSDI,” said Ivan DeLoatch, Executive Director of the FGDC. “This is a unique opportunity to honor significant contributions to an individual or group of individuals that have furthered the goal of available and easily integrated data to enhance the understanding of our physical and cultural world.”

Eligibility: The nominations are available to an individual or a team representing federal, state, tribal, regional, and/or local government, academia, or non­profit and professional organization that has developed an outstanding, innovative, and operational tool, application, or service capability used by multiple organizations that furthers the vision of the NSDI. The nominee must be a US citizen.

Nomination Process: Each nomination package will be submitted in electronic form through the award website and include justification and related nomination information. Nominations are due by May 6, 2016.

Award Selection: An interagency team of SDI experts from the FGDC will review all nominations and make a recommendation for the award to the FGDC Chair who will make the final decision on the award. The award information will be posted on the FGDC website.

The award is based on the following foundational precepts:

  • Innovation and vision
  • Interoperability
  • Use of standards
  • Advancement of NSDI principles
  • Service to communities of users
  • Developed once, used by many
  • Improved performance and service
  • Real-world application

Further questions can be directed to Gita Urban-Mathieux  or Rich Frazier.

Experts Launch Project to Assess Drought Effects on Ecosystems and How Communities Can Adapt:

USGS Newsroom - Tue, 03/22/2016 - 07:00
Summary: RESTON, Va. —  A new public-private research collaboration supported by the U.S. Geological Survey will tackle how to best cope with the increasing droughts of the future A Partnership of USGS, The Nature Conservancy, and Wildlife Conservation Society under the Science for Nature and People Partnership

Contact Information:

Catherine Puckett, USGS ( Phone: 352-377-2469 ); Junji Nishihata, SNAPP ( Phone: 514-839-7030 );



 

 

In recognition of World Water Day and in conjunction with the White House Water Summit, the U.S. Geological Survey is raising awareness of water issues and potential solutions in the United States. 


 

RESTON, Va. —  A new public-private research collaboration supported by the U.S. Geological Survey will tackle how to best cope with the increasing droughts of the future.

The USGS, The Nature Conservancy, and The Wildlife Conservation Society are launching the Ecological Drought Working Group as part of the Science for Nature and People Partnership (SNAPP). This research group is composed of drought, climate change, economic and conservation experts from these and other institutions. The scientists will conduct a comprehensive assessment of the ecological impacts of drought on ecosystems and wildlife and people and their livelihoods, as well as propose methods to lessen such impacts, both ecologically and economically. 

“The group’s findings will inform local communities, businesses and conservation practitioners about the most effective ways to prepare for and respond to drought impacts,” said Shawn Carter, senior scientist at the USGS National Climate Change and Wildlife Science Center and a co-lead of the working group.

Carter noted that both historical and recent droughts not only cause great economic hardships, but they also are often ecologically devastating. Droughts, which have ravaged much of the United States in recent years, are estimated to have resulted in more than $100 billion in damages between 1980 and 2000.

“Our work can help communities adapt to the long-term effects of drought by supporting healthy ecosystems,” said Carter. “For example, even a relatively simple action, such as reintroducing beavers into ecosystems where they used to live, can boost the natural storage capacity of watersheds.”

Working group co-lead Molly Cross, North America WCS climate change adaptation coordinator, emphasized that for people to be adequately prepared for drought they need to understand how drought-impacted ecosystems can harm human communities, such as through increased wildfire hazards or through adverse effects on fish and wildlife valued for hunting- and angling-based economies. “By raising awareness and understanding about these ecological impacts of drought, we’ll be able to help people all over the country make informed decisions to prepare for and respond to long-term drought,” Cross added.

Products from the SNAPP Ecological Drought Working Group will be tailored to add value to state and local drought planning, including in the Upper Missouri headwaters of Montana. In 2015, five counties in this region were declared disaster areas due to their extreme drought conditions.  The Obama Administration’s National Drought Resilience Partnership selected this region as a place to demonstrate how federal and state agencies can leverage knowledge, capacity and resources to better prepare Montana communities for future drought impacts. Additional case studies will be examined by the SNAPP Ecological Drought working group to encompass a range of drought impacts across the United States.

“Drought has been plaguing our country for decades, but people tend to focus on immediate challenges such as the impacts on agriculture and surface and groundwater availability,” said Craig Groves, executive director of the Science for Nature and People Partnership. “Drought and its impacts are much more complicated and profound than that.  Even seemingly minor changes in water supply can have huge ecological impacts that are keenly felt by both people and nature. The Science for Nature and People Partnership is delighted to be working with USGS to better understand and respond to this mounting challenge for people from all parts of the country.”

“Climate change is likely to intensify the frequency and ferocity of droughts in places where it typically occurs, and lead to novel drought impacts in unexpected places,” said Giulio Boccaletti, Global Managing Director for Water, The Nature Conservancy. “The new SNAPP initiative will be crucial for helping us to better anticipate the range of future drought impacts so that we can implement strategies to protect people and nature, and improve the odds of achieving long-term benefits from our drought planning efforts.”

About the United States Geological Survey

The USGS is a science organization that provides impartial information on the health of our ecosystems and environment, the natural hazards that threaten us, the natural resources we rely on, the impacts of climate and land-use change, and the core science systems that help us provide timely, relevant, and useable information. For more information, visit http://usgs.gov.

About the Science for Nature and People Partnership

Founded in 2013, the Science for Nature and People (SNAPP) partnership is the world’s premier innovation engine of conservation science and sustainable development policy, partnering with public, non-profit and private sector organizations around the world to transform the relationship between people and nature. Backed by The Nature Conservancy (TNC), the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) and the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS) at the University of California, Santa Barbara, SNAPP funds, convenes and supports Expert Working Groups addressing challenges in four focus areas: Food Security and Nature, Water Security and Nature, Community Resilience and Climate Change, and Ecosystem Services and Biodiversity Benefits. SNAP has been generously supported by Angela Nomellini and Ken Olivier, Shirley and Harry Hagey, Steve and Roberta Denning, Seth Neiman, the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, Ward W. and Priscilla B. Woods, and the David and Lucile Packard Foundation. For more information, visit http://snappartnership.net/

Deadline to Register for Disaster Assistance is April 5

FEMA Press Releases - Mon, 03/21/2016 - 12:52

NORTH LITTLE ROCK – Residents of 11 Arkansas counties who suffered damage from the severe storms of December – January have only until Tuesday, April 5, 2016 to register for federal disaster assistance with the Federal Emergency Management Agency and the U.S. Small Business Administration.

Assistance can include money for rental assistance, essential home repairs, personal property loss and other serious disaster-related needs not covered by insurance.

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Make Smart Decisions with Louisiana Flood Recovery Funds

FEMA Press Releases - Mon, 03/21/2016 - 10:39

Baton Rouge, La. – With more than $4.3 million in Individual Assistance already in the hands of Louisiana flood survivors, state and federal officials have some advice: Resist the urge to splurge.

State and federal disaster assistance is meant to help people pay for necessities and start to get back on their feet.

Disaster assistance may include grants and loans to help pay for emergency repairs to damaged homes, temporary housing, or other serious disaster-related expenses not covered by insurance or other sources.

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Categories: Federal News

Disaster Recovery Centers Open in Two Louisiana Parishes

FEMA Press Releases - Mon, 03/21/2016 - 09:21

BATON ROUGE, La. –Disaster recovery centers will open Monday, March 21, in Monroe and Slidell to help Louisiana flood survivors. The centers are open 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Saturday and noon to 5 p.m. Sunday until further notice. The centers will be closed on Easter Sunday, March 27.

The disaster recovery centers are located at the following addresses:

Monroe Civic Center
401 Lea Joyner Expressway
Monroe, Ouachita Parish, La.

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Categories: Federal News

Eastern Monarch Butterflies at Risk of Extinction Unless Numbers Increase

USGS Newsroom - Mon, 03/21/2016 - 07:30
Summary: Long-term declines in the overwintering Eastern population of North American monarch butterflies are significantly increasing their likelihood of becoming extinct over the next two decades, according to Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego and U.S. Geological Survey research published today.

Contact Information:

Mario Aguilera, Scripps ( Phone: 858-534-3624 ); Catherine Puckett, USGS ( Phone: 352-377-2469 );



Long-term declines in the overwintering Eastern population of North American monarch butterflies are significantly increasing their likelihood of becoming extinct over the next two decades, according to Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego and U.S. Geological Survey research published today.

Monarch Male Butterfly — A monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus) resting and sunning at an overwintering site in the Piedra Herrada Monarch Butterfly Sanctuary in Mexico. This individual is a male, identifiable by the black spot on each hindwing. Photo credit: Steve Hilburger, USGS.

 

The new study, available in the journal Scientific Reports, found that the Eastern migratory monarch population declined by 84 percent from the winter of 1996-1997 to the winter of 2014-2015. Using this information, the study demonstrated that there is a substantial chance – 11 to 57 percent – of quasi-extinction over the next 20 years. A quasi-extinct population is one with so few remaining individuals left that recovery is impossible. While the remaining individuals may survive for a short time, the population as a whole will inevitably go extinct.

Monarch Butterflies on Tree — A group of monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) covers an oyamel fir tree (Abies religiosa) at an overwintering site in the Piedra Herrada Monarch Butterfly Sanctuary in Mexico. Photo credit: Steve Hilburger, USGS.

“Because monarch numbers vary dramatically from year to year depending on weather and other factors, increasing the average population size is the single-most important way to provide these iconic butterflies with a much-needed buffer against extinction,” said Brice Semmens, the lead author of the study and a scientist at Scripps. 

Semmens said that as an example of this variability, just after the analysis concluded, the World Wildlife Fund Mexico and partners reported a large increase in monarch numbers since last year. However, this increase was followed by a recent winter storm that may have adversely affected the population. The authors emphasized that although one good winter – as occurred this year – is positive news, higher average monarch numbers are necessary for reducing the long-term risk of quasi-extinction.

Because counting individual monarchs is challenging, scientists measure population size based on the geographic area that their colonies cover while spending the winter in Mexico. The United States, Mexico and Canada aim to increase the number of Eastern monarchs wintering in Mexico so that they occupy about six hectares, or about 15 acres, by 2020. This year’s population size increased substantially to about four hectares, or close to 10 acres. The population was 1.13 hectares (about 2.8 acres) during the winter of 2014-2015, and at its lowest, 0.67 hectares (about 1.7 acres) during the 2013-2014 winter. 

The Scripps and USGS scientists found that if the Eastern population reaches the six-hectare goal announced in last year’s national pollinator strategy, the quasi-extinction risk over 20 years would decrease by more than half.

“Previously published research suggested that the most effective way to increase monarch numbers is to focus on the restoration of their breeding habitat,” said USGS scientist Darius Semmens, a coauthor of the report. “Over the previous two winters, Eastern monarch populations were very low, indicating a higher risk of losing the species. If their numbers continue to grow, as they did this year, the risk will decrease.”

Scripps and the USGS collaborated with scientists from the University of Arizona, Iowa State University, University of Minnesota and the University of Kansas on the study. The research was conducted as part of the Monarch Conservation Science Partnership, a team of scientists and resource managers working together to help inform the management of monarch butterflies. The partnership was hosted by the USGS Powell Center for Analysis and Synthesis in Fort Collins, Colorado.

About the Monarch Butterfly

Reasons for monarch population declines are complex, although some evidence suggests that loss of breeding habitat is the primary factor. Other factors include adverse weather conditions in recent years, loss of overwintering habitat, disease and exposure to contaminants.

There are two main populations of monarch butterflies in North America: the Western, which winters and migrates west of the Rocky Mountains, and the more abundant Eastern population, which is the subject of the new study and ranges east of the Rockies from central Mexico to southern Canada. Eastern monarchs breed in the United States and Canada, and migrate to Mexico for the winter. Western monarchs migrate inland north and east from colonies along the California coast to states ranging from Washington to Arizona.​ The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is considering a petition to protect monarchs under the Endangered Species Act.

For more information about monarch research, please visit the Scripps and USGS websites.

[Watch the Piedra Herrada Monarch Butterfuly Sanctuary, Mexico video at http://gallery.usgs.gov/videos/1014] Piedra Herrada Monarch Butterfly Sanctuary, Mexico — A group of monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) flying among the oyamel fir tree (Abies religiosa) forest at an overwintering site in the Piedra Herrada Monarch Butterfly Sanctuary, Mexico. Camera: Steve Hilburger, USGS.
 
Download this video from our Multimedia Gallery.

East Texas Survivors Encouraged to Register for Disaster Assistance

FEMA Press Releases - Sun, 03/20/2016 - 16:01

AUSTIN, Texas—East Texans who sustained damage or losses from the severe storms, tornadoes, straight-line winds and flooding that began March 7, 2016 and is continuing, can now register for disaster assistance with the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA).

The presidential disaster declaration of March 19 makes federal assistance available to eligible individuals and business owners in three counties: Jasper, Newton and Orange.

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Beware of Fraud, Scams When Seeking Disaster Assistance

FEMA Press Releases - Sun, 03/20/2016 - 15:11

Baton Rouge, La. – State and federal recovery officials urge Louisiana residents affected by the March flooding events throughout the state to watch for and report any suspicious activity or potential fraud.

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More Louisiana Residents Now Eligible for Federal Disaster Assistance, Urged to Register

FEMA Press Releases - Sun, 03/20/2016 - 14:58

Baton Rouge, La – Now that flood survivors in 26 parishes may be eligible for federal disaster assistance, their first step is to register.

Individuals and business owners in the designated parishes who had storm damage may apply for assistance two ways:

  • Online at www.DisasterAssistance.gov

  • By calling 1-800-621-FEMA (3362)

    • People who have a speech disability or hearing loss and use TTY should call 1-800-462-7585.

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Louisianans in Seven Parishes Encouraged to Apply for Federal, State Disaster Assistance

FEMA Press Releases - Sun, 03/20/2016 - 14:52

Baton Rouge, La. – Louisiana homeowners, renters and business owners who sustained property damage as a result of the ongoing severe storms and flooding are urged to register with the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), as they may be eligible for federal and state disaster assistance.

The presidential disaster declaration of March 13 makes federal Individual Assistance available to eligible applicants in Bossier, Claiborne, Grant, Morehouse, Ouachita, Richland, and Webster parishes.

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