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South Carolina Disaster Recovery Centers Open in Darlington and Orangeburg Counties

FEMA Press Releases - Thu, 10/15/2015 - 16:10

COLUMBIA, S.C. – Two disaster recovery centers are now open in Darlington and Orangeburg to help South Carolina flood survivors. The centers’ hours are 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. seven days a week until further notice.

Representatives from the South Carolina Emergency Management Division, the Federal Emergency Management Agency, the Small Business Administration and other agencies will be at the centers to explain disaster assistance programs and help survivors apply for aid.

The disaster recovery centers are located at the following addresses:

 

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Categories: Federal News

Grass Carp Eggs Compromised by Settling on Streambeds

USGS Newsroom Technical - Thu, 10/15/2015 - 14:10
Summary: Grass carp egg survival is compromised when they settle on streambeds and are potentially covered by sediments, according to a new study by the U.S. Geological Survey. It has been long assumed that the eggs of Asian carps, including grass carp, must be carried in the water current in order to hatch successfully, but no previous scientific studies have proven that theory. 

Contact Information:

Jennifer LaVista ( Phone: 303-202-4764 );



Grass carp egg survival is compromised when they settle on streambeds and are potentially covered by sediments, according to a new study by the U.S. Geological Survey. It has been long assumed that the eggs of Asian carps, including grass carp, must be carried in the water current in order to hatch successfully, but no previous scientific studies have proven that theory. 

This information is critical in helping resource managers mitigate effects of an Asian carp invasion. Results can be used to improve models that help predict where and when carp might successfully reproduce. Findings support the idea of engineering settling zones as a potential control mechanism. The full report is available online.

"Many assessments of the potential for Asian carp invasion are based on the assumption that if eggs fall to the sediment, they die," said USGS scientist Duane Chapman. "This study constitutes the first actual evidence that falling to the sediment is detrimental to Asian carp eggs, allowing scientists more confidence in predicting where these fish could reproduce."

Using sand, the effects of varying sediment levels on grass carp eggs were tested at different developmental states and temperatures. Survival was low in the partial burial (5–10 percent) and very low (0–4 percent) in the full burial treatment. In treatments where eggs rested on the sediment surface but had no sediment over them, survival was higher (15-35 percent) but, as in all treatments with settled eggs, hatching was severely delayed compared to eggs suspended by current.  Many settled eggs lived until the end of the three separate study periods but did not hatch. Deformities, such as missing heads and heart conditions, occurred at high rates in the partial and full burials.

This study was supported by the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative. For more information visit the USGS Great Lakes Restoration Initiative website.

 

Leading Cancer Center Weathers Storms in Multiple Ways

FEMA Press Releases - Thu, 10/15/2015 - 10:54

FEMA and the state of Texas are highlighting Texas communities that have taken steps to reduce or eliminate long-term risk to people and property.

HOUSTON – For the last 25 years, the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston has consistently ranked among the top two cancer care hospitals in the nation, according to a survey published by U.S. News & World Report. The hospital’s staff of more than 19,000 treat an average of 114,000 patients each year from around the world.

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Categories: Federal News

Disaster Relief Trials Sweep Portland

FEMA Press Releases - Wed, 10/14/2015 - 17:24

This Saturday bicycle enthusiasts will test their resourcefulness at the Disaster Relief Trials (DRTs) in Oregon. The event is a competitive cargo bike disaster drill that encourages community preparedness.

Cargo bikes can haul loads weighing 200 pounds or more of food, water and medical supplies. In addition to hauling supplies, cargo bikes provide a transportation option that is more nimble than cars, especially in the aftermath of an earthquake when transportation and fuel infrastructure will be severely damaged. 

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Categories: Federal News

Three Years after Sandy: Most of New Jersey’s Boardwalks Are Rebuilt

FEMA Press Releases - Wed, 10/14/2015 - 15:55

EATONTOWN, N.J. -- Hurricane Sandy struck a terrible blow to the Jersey Shore in 2012, Up and down the state’s 127 miles of coastline, boardwalks were driven off their foundations and transformed into pil

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Help is Still Available for Survivors of July’s Severe Storms

FEMA Press Releases - Wed, 10/14/2015 - 15:23

FRANKFORT, Ky. – Survivors in counties affected by the July severe storms, who registered with FEMA for aid and have questions, can call the FEMA helpline at 800-621-3362 (TTY 800-462-7585, Video Relay Service 800-621-3362) or go online at DisasterAssistance.gov.

The eight eligible counties were: Breathitt, Carter, Fleming, Johnson, Leslie, Perry, Rowan and Trimble, and the deadline to register with FEMA for assistance was Oct. 12, 2015.

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Birds in the Bakken: Oil Development Can Affect Critical Habitat

USGS Newsroom - Wed, 10/14/2015 - 14:00
Summary: Many grassland bird species in the Bakken shale region, including some seriously declining populations, are displaced from their habitats as a result of oil and gas development, according to new U.S. Geological Survey research

Contact Information:

Marisa Lubeck ( Phone: 303-526-6694 );



Many grassland bird species in the Bakken shale region, including some seriously declining populations, are displaced from their habitats as a result of oil and gas development, according to new U.S. Geological Survey research.

During 2012-2014, USGS and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service scientists studied Bakken grassland sites in northern North Dakota containing oil well pads, which are the gravel surfaces that house all oil extraction infrastructures. Overall, grassland birds avoided areas within 150 meters, or about 492 feet of gravel roads, 267 meters (about 876 feet) of single-bore well pads and 150 meters of pads with more than one well. These results suggest that detrimental effects of oil extraction on habitat extend considerably beyond the immediate oil well sites.

"Quantifying environmental degradation caused by oil development is a critical step in understanding how to better mitigate harm to valuable wildlife populations," said USGS scientist Sarah Thompson, the lead author of the report. "Our findings can help managers and developers determine the best locations for future infrastructure." 

The study focused on sites developed with unconventional methods, such as horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing, or fracking. The most commonly detected species were the grasshopper sparrow, Savannah sparrow, clay-colored sparrow, bobolink, chestnut-collared longspur, western meadowlark, brown-headed cowbird, Baird's sparrow, Sprague's pipit and red-winged blackbird.

Specific findings include:

  • Individual species showed varying tolerance for oil wells.
  • Reduced population densities of the Baird’s sparrow, chestnut-collared longspur and grasshopper sparrow were observed as far as 550 meters from single-bore wells, which were the farthest distances surveyed.
  • Clay-colored sparrows and brown-headed cowbirds were tolerant of oil-related infrastructure.
  • Sprague’s pipit, which is a candidate species for listing under the Endangered Species Act, showed reduced density within 350 meters of single-bore wells.

"Our findings suggest that reducing new road construction, concentrating wells along developed corridors, combining numerous wells on multi-bore pads and placing wells near existing roads could help minimize loss of suitable habitat for birds," Thompson said.

The Bakken oil-producing regions of North Dakota, Montana and Canada are home to a particularly high density and diversity of grassland bird species that are declining across North America. For more information on USGS ecosystem research in the Bakken, please visit the USGS Northern Prairie Wildlife Research Center website.

Survivors who are not U.S. Citizens may be eligible for FEMA Disaster Assistance

FEMA Press Releases - Wed, 10/14/2015 - 11:23

SACRAMENTO– Residents in Lake County affected by the Valley Fire, including those who are not U.S. citizens, may be eligible through the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) for assistance. If you are unsure of your eligibility, FEMA will assist you through the process when you call 800-621-3362 and register.

The aid may be available to citizens, non-citizen nationals, and qualified aliens. Qualified aliens include those with legal permanent residence (shown by Green Cards). Their status will not be jeopardized by requesting disaster assistance.

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CNMI gets chance to show Soudelor preparedness lessons learned

FEMA Press Releases - Wed, 10/14/2015 - 03:00

Typhoons, as we witnessed with Soudelor, are a double threat. They can produce both dangerously high winds and widespread torrential rains.

Slow moving storms and tropical storms moving into mountainous regions tend to produce especially heavy rain. This not only damages or destroys homes directly with water and wind, but can also produce damages indirectly with landslides or mud slides. Flash flooding is also a possibility, and flooding near streams or low lying areas may persist for several days or more after a storm.

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Categories: Federal News

FEMA Rebuilding Experts to Provide Advice in Saipan

FEMA Press Releases - Wed, 10/14/2015 - 01:23

SAIPAN, CNMI – Typhoon Soudelor survivors who want to build back better and stronger can learn how from experts for the next two weeks.

 

Federal Emergency Management Agency Mitigation specialists have been at Ace Hardware in Susupe, talking with customers and handing out free booklets and pamphlets. Their last day there is Sunday, October 18.

 

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Categories: Federal News

Small Business Administration is Important to ALL Disaster Survivors

FEMA Press Releases - Tue, 10/13/2015 - 14:28

SACRAMENTO – The U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) plays a unique role in helping all disaster survivors recover. It provides low-interest recovery loans to businesses and residents, if they can afford to repay. By registering with the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), most survivors are automatically referred to the SBA.

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Disaster Recovery Centers in South Carolina Open in Florence and Kershaw Counties

FEMA Press Releases - Mon, 10/12/2015 - 18:03

COLUMBIA, S.C. – Two disaster recovery centers are open in Florence and Kershaw counties to help South Carolina flood survivors. The centers are open 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. seven days a week.

Representatives from the South Carolina Emergency Management Division, the Federal Emergency Management Agency, the U.S. Small Business Administration and other agencies will be at the centers to explain disaster assistance programs and help survivors apply for aid.

The disaster recovery centers are located at the following addresses:

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What to Expect After South Carolina Survivors Call FEMA

FEMA Press Releases - Sun, 10/11/2015 - 14:58

COLUMBIA, S.C. – Registering with the Federal Emergency Management Agency is the first step to getting federal disaster assistance.

After you apply, FEMA will send you a copy of your application and a copy of “Help After a Disaster: Applicant’s Guide to the Individuals and Households Program,” which will answer many of your questions.

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South Carolina Disaster Recovery Centers Open in Richland County

FEMA Press Releases - Sat, 10/10/2015 - 10:51

COLUMBIA, S.C. – Two disaster recovery centers are open in Richland County to help South Carolina flood survivors. The centers are open 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. seven days a week.

Representatives from the South Carolina Emergency Management Division, the Federal Emergency Management Agency, the Small Business Administration and other agencies will be at the centers to explain disaster assistance programs and help survivors apply for aid.

The disaster recovery centers are located at the following addresses:

Language English
Categories: Federal News